Mac OS X 10.0

Mac OS X v10.010.0Cheetah (10.0)Mac OS X 10.0 CheetahMac OS X 10.0.4Mac OS X 10.0/CheetahMac OS X CheetahMac OS X Developer Preview 3Mac OS X v10.0 "Cheetahv10.0 Cheetah
Mac OS X version 10.0 (code named Cheetah) is the first major release of Mac OS X (renamed OS X in 2012 and macOS in 2016), Apple’s desktop and server operating system.wikipedia
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MacOS

Mac OS XOS XMac
Mac OS X version 10.0 (code named Cheetah) is the first major release of Mac OS X (renamed OS X in 2012 and macOS in 2016), Apple’s desktop and server operating system.
The first desktop version, Mac OS X 10.0, was released in March 2001, with its first update, 10.1, arriving later that year.

Mac OS X 10.1

10.1Mac OS X v10.1Mac OS X Puma
It was the successor of the Mac OS X Public Beta and the predecessor of Mac OS X 10.1 (code named Puma).
It superseded Mac OS X 10.0 and preceded Mac OS X 10.2.

Darwin (operating system)

DarwinDarwin operating systemOpenDarwin
Mac OS X introduced the new Darwin Unix-like core and a completely new system of memory management.
This was developed into Rhapsody in 1997, Mac OS X Server 1.0 in 1999, Mac OS X Public Beta in 2000, and Mac OS X 10.0 in 2001.

Operating system

operating systemsOScomputer operating system
Mac OS X version 10.0 (code named Cheetah) is the first major release of Mac OS X (renamed OS X in 2012 and macOS in 2016), Apple’s desktop and server operating system.
The operating system was first released in 1999 as Mac OS X Server 1.0, followed in March 2001 by a client version (Mac OS X v10.0 "Cheetah").

Macintosh operating systems

Mac OSMacMacintosh
Mac OS X 10.0 was a radical departure from the classic Mac OS and was Apple’s long-awaited answer for a next generation Macintosh operating system.

Code name

codenamecodenamedcryptonym
Mac OS X version 10.0 (code named Cheetah) is the first major release of Mac OS X (renamed OS X in 2012 and macOS in 2016), Apple’s desktop and server operating system.

Aqua (user interface)

AquaAqua user interfaceAqua interface
Its first appearance in a commercial product was in the July 2000 release of iMovie 2, followed by Mac OS X 10.0 the year after.

Classic Mac OS

Mac OSMacintoshMac OS Classic
Mac OS X 10.0 was a radical departure from the classic Mac OS and was Apple’s long-awaited answer for a next generation Macintosh operating system.
The desktop version, Mac OS X 10.0, followed on March 24, 2001, supporting the new Aqua user interface.

Mac OS X Public Beta

Public BetabetaKodiak (Public Beta)
It was the successor of the Mac OS X Public Beta and the predecessor of Mac OS X 10.1 (code named Puma).
Mac OS X v10.0 was the first completed release of Mac OS X. It became available in March 2001.

Mac OS 9

Mac OS 9.19Mac OS 9.2.2
It introduced a brand new code base completely separate from Mac OS 9's, as well as all previous Apple operating systems.

IBook

iBook G4iBook G3iBook (white)
All clamshell iBooks supported Mac OS X 10.0 through 10.3.9.

Dock (macOS)

DockmacOS DockMac OS X dock
In a review of Mac OS X v10.0 the following year, he also noted that the Dock does far too many tasks than it should for optimum ease-of-use, including launching apps, switching apps, opening files, and holding minimized windows.

Carbon (API)

CarbonCarbon APICarbonLib
Official Mac OS X support arrived in 2001 with the release of Mac OS X v10.0, the first public version of the new OS.

Software versioning

versionversion numbermajor release
Mac OS X version 10.0 (code named Cheetah) is the first major release of Mac OS X (renamed OS X in 2012 and macOS in 2016), Apple’s desktop and server operating system.

Apple Inc.

AppleApple ComputerApple Inc
Mac OS X version 10.0 (code named Cheetah) is the first major release of Mac OS X (renamed OS X in 2012 and macOS in 2016), Apple’s desktop and server operating system.

Unix-like

*nixUnixlike
Mac OS X introduced the new Darwin Unix-like core and a completely new system of memory management.

Random-access memory

RAMmemoryrandom access memory
The system requirements for Mac OS X 10.0 were not well received by the Macintosh community, as at the time the amount of RAM standard with Macintosh computers was 64 megabytes (MB), while the Mac OS X 10.0 requirements called for 128 MB of RAM.

Megabyte

MBmegabytesMbyte
The system requirements for Mac OS X 10.0 were not well received by the Macintosh community, as at the time the amount of RAM standard with Macintosh computers was 64 megabytes (MB), while the Mac OS X 10.0 requirements called for 128 MB of RAM.

Central processing unit

CPUprocessorprocessors
In addition, processor upgrade cards, which were quite popular for obsolete pre-G3 Power Macintosh computers, were not supported (and never officially have been, but can be made to work through third-party utility programs).

Obsolescence

obsoleteobsolescentpassé
In addition, processor upgrade cards, which were quite popular for obsolete pre-G3 Power Macintosh computers, were not supported (and never officially have been, but can be made to work through third-party utility programs).

Power Macintosh

Power MacPowerMacPower Macs
In addition, processor upgrade cards, which were quite popular for obsolete pre-G3 Power Macintosh computers, were not supported (and never officially have been, but can be made to work through third-party utility programs).

Power Macintosh G3

Power Macintosh G3 (Blue & White)Power Mac G3Power Macintosh G3 (Blue and White)