Macdonald triad

an anecdote from his childhoodcriteriahomicidal triadpredictors of future violent criminal behavior
The Macdonald triad (also known as the triad of sociopathy or the homicidal triad) is a set of three factors that has been suggested (Macdonald 1963), if all three or any combination of two, are present together, to be predictive of or associated with later violent tendencies, particularly with relation to serial offenses.wikipedia
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John Macdonald (psychiatrist)

John Macdonald
The triad was first proposed by psychiatrist J.M. Macdonald in "The Threat to Kill", a 1963 paper in the American Journal of Psychiatry.
John Marshall Macdonald (9 November 1920 in Dunedin, New Zealand – 16 December 2007 in Englewood, Colorado) was a forensic psychiatrist most renowned for his discovery of the Macdonald triad of sociopathic traits and his profiling of serial killers.

Cruelty to animals

animal crueltyanimal abusecruelty
The triad links cruelty to animals, obsession with fire-setting, and persistent bedwetting past a certain age, to violent behaviors, particularly homicidal behavior and sexually predatory behavior.
Cruelty to animals is one of the three components of the Macdonald triad, behavior considered to be one of the signs of violent antisocial behavior in children and adolescents.

Nocturnal enuresis

bedwettingbed wettingbed-wetting
The triad links cruelty to animals, obsession with fire-setting, and persistent bedwetting past a certain age, to violent behaviors, particularly homicidal behavior and sexually predatory behavior.
Bedwetting was part of the Macdonald triad, a set of three behavioral characteristics described by John Macdonald in 1963.

Zoosadism

tortured animalskilling animalstorturing animals
Zoosadism
It is part of the Macdonald triad, a set of three behaviors that are considered a precursor to psychopathic behavior.

Pyromania

pyromaniacfire settingfirebug
The triad links cruelty to animals, obsession with fire-setting, and persistent bedwetting past a certain age, to violent behaviors, particularly homicidal behavior and sexually predatory behavior.
Macdonald triad

Serial killer

serial killersserial killingserial murder
Serial killer
A disproportionate number exhibit one, two, or all three of the Macdonald triad of predictors of future violent behavior:

Dark triad

dark triadicmore self-admiring, more manipulative, and more psychopathic
Dark triad
Macdonald triad

Homicide

homicide detectivehomicideshomicidal
The Macdonald triad (also known as the triad of sociopathy or the homicidal triad) is a set of three factors that has been suggested (Macdonald 1963), if all three or any combination of two, are present together, to be predictive of or associated with later violent tendencies, particularly with relation to serial offenses.

Violence

violentviolent behaviorphysical violence
The Macdonald triad (also known as the triad of sociopathy or the homicidal triad) is a set of three factors that has been suggested (Macdonald 1963), if all three or any combination of two, are present together, to be predictive of or associated with later violent tendencies, particularly with relation to serial offenses.

Recidivism

recidivistrecidivistsrepeat offenders
The Macdonald triad (also known as the triad of sociopathy or the homicidal triad) is a set of three factors that has been suggested (Macdonald 1963), if all three or any combination of two, are present together, to be predictive of or associated with later violent tendencies, particularly with relation to serial offenses.

Psychiatrist

psychiatristsclinical psychiatristconsultant psychiatrist
The triad was first proposed by psychiatrist J.M. Macdonald in "The Threat to Kill", a 1963 paper in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

The American Journal of Psychiatry

The triad was first proposed by psychiatrist J.M. Macdonald in "The Threat to Kill", a 1963 paper in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

John E. Douglas

John Douglas
Small-scale studies conducted by psychiatrists Daniel Hellman and Nathan Blackman, and then FBI agents John E. Douglas and Robert K. Ressler along with Dr. Ann Burgess, claimed substantial evidence for the association of these childhood patterns with later predatory behavior.

Robert Ressler

Robert K. ResslerRessler, RobertRobert K Ressler
Small-scale studies conducted by psychiatrists Daniel Hellman and Nathan Blackman, and then FBI agents John E. Douglas and Robert K. Ressler along with Dr. Ann Burgess, claimed substantial evidence for the association of these childhood patterns with later predatory behavior.

Ann Burgess

Ann W. Burgess
Small-scale studies conducted by psychiatrists Daniel Hellman and Nathan Blackman, and then FBI agents John E. Douglas and Robert K. Ressler along with Dr. Ann Burgess, claimed substantial evidence for the association of these childhood patterns with later predatory behavior.

Serial offender hunting patterns

predatory behavior
Small-scale studies conducted by psychiatrists Daniel Hellman and Nathan Blackman, and then FBI agents John E. Douglas and Robert K. Ressler along with Dr. Ann Burgess, claimed substantial evidence for the association of these childhood patterns with later predatory behavior.

Urban legend

urban mythurban legendsurban myths
The "triad" concept as a particular combination of behaviors linked to violence may not have any particular validity – it has been called an urban legend.

Federal Bureau of Investigation

FBIF.B.I.FBI Special Agent
FBI Special Agent Alan Brantly believed that some offenders kill animals as a rehearsal for killing human victims.

Enuresis

bed wettingbed-wettingbed-wetting problem
Enuresis is "unintentional bed-wetting during sleep, persistent after the age of five".

Psychopathy

psychopathpsychopathicsociopath
The Macdonald triad (also known as the triad of sociopathy or the homicidal triad) is a set of three factors that has been suggested (Macdonald 1963), if all three or any combination of two, are present together, to be predictive of or associated with later violent tendencies, particularly with relation to serial offenses.
Macdonald triad

Zoophilia

bestialityzoophilesex with animals
Zoosadism specifically is one member of the Macdonald triad of precursors to sociopathic behavior.

List of eponyms (L–Z)

John Macdonald, New Zealand psychologist - Macdonald triad.

Richard Chase

Richard Trenton Chase
He was abused by his parents; and, by the age of 10, he exhibited evidence of all three parts of the Macdonald triad: bed wetting, arson, and cruelty to animals, which is seen by some as possible indicators of future violent tendencies.

Hannibal Lecter

Dr. Hannibal LecterHannibalHannibal Lecktor
In the novel Red Dragon, protagonist Will Graham says that Lecter has no conscience and tortured animals as a child, but does not exhibit any other of the criteria traditionally associated with sociopathy; Graham explains that psychiatrists refer to Lecter as a sociopath because "they don't know what else to call him".