Macintosh

MacApple MacintoshMacsMacintosh computersMac computerMacintosh computerApple MacMac OSAppleOS X
The Macintosh (pronounced as ; branded as Mac since 1998) is a family of personal computers designed, manufactured, and sold by Apple Inc. since January 1984.wikipedia
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Apple Inc.

AppleApple ComputerApple Computer, Inc.
The Macintosh (pronounced as ; branded as Mac since 1998) is a family of personal computers designed, manufactured, and sold by Apple Inc. since January 1984.
The company's hardware products include the iPhone smartphone, the iPad tablet computer, the Mac personal computer, the iPod portable media player, the Apple Watch smartwatch, the Apple TV digital media player, and the HomePod smart speaker.

Macintosh 128K

Macintoshoriginal Macintoshfirst Macintosh
The original Macintosh was the first mass-market personal computer that featured a graphical user interface, built-in screen and mouse.
The Macintosh 128K, originally released as the Apple Macintosh, is the original Apple Macintosh personal computer.

Personal computer

PCPCspersonal computers
The Macintosh (pronounced as ; branded as Mac since 1998) is a family of personal computers designed, manufactured, and sold by Apple Inc. since January 1984.
For example, "PC" is used in contrast with "Mac", an Apple Macintosh computer.

Power Macintosh

Power MacPower Macs5200
Even after the transition to the superior PowerPC-based Power Macintosh line in the mid-1990s, the falling prices of commodity PC components, poor inventory management with the Macintosh Performa, and the release of Windows 95 saw the Macintosh user base decline.
The Power Macintosh, later Power Mac, is a family of personal computers that were designed, manufactured, and sold by Apple Computer, Inc. as part of its Macintosh brand from March 1994 until August 2006.

PowerBook G3

Bronze Keyboard (Lombard) PowerBook G3PowerBook G3 (Bronze Keyboard)first generation of G3 PowerBooks
Prompted by the returning Steve Jobs' belief that the Macintosh line had become too complex, Apple consolidated nearly twenty models in mid-1997 (including models made for specific regions) down to four in mid-1999: The Power Macintosh G3, iMac, 14.1" PowerBook G3, and 12" iBook.
The PowerBook G3 is a series of laptop Macintosh personal computers designed, manufactured and sold by Apple Computer, Inc. from 1997 to 2001.

IBM PC compatible

PCIBM PCPCs
Early Macintosh models were expensive, hindering its competitiveness in a market already dominated by the Commodore 64 for consumers, as well as the IBM Personal Computer and its accompanying clone market for businesses.
Only the Macintosh kept significant market share without compatibility with the IBM PC.

IMac

iMacsApple iMacsi Mac
Its current lineup includes four desktops (the all-in-one iMac and iMac Pro, and the desktop Mac Mini and Mac Pro), and three laptops (the MacBook, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro).
iMac is a family of all-in-one Macintosh desktop computers designed and built by Apple Inc. It has been the primary part of Apple's consumer desktop offerings since its debut in August 1998, and has evolved through seven distinct forms.

MacBook Air

Apple Macbook AirAirsApple MacBook Air SuperDrive
Its current lineup includes four desktops (the all-in-one iMac and iMac Pro, and the desktop Mac Mini and Mac Pro), and three laptops (the MacBook, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro).
The MacBook Air is a line of Macintosh subnotebook computers developed and manufactured by Apple Inc. It consists of a full-size keyboard, a machined aluminum case, and a thin light structure.

MacBook (2015–present)

MacBookRetina MacBookMacBook (Retina)
Its current lineup includes four desktops (the all-in-one iMac and iMac Pro, and the desktop Mac Mini and Mac Pro), and three laptops (the MacBook, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro).
The MacBook (known colloquially as the Retina MacBook or 12-inch MacBook) is a line of Macintosh portable computers introduced in March 2015 by Apple Inc.

Mac Pro

Apple Mac ProMac Pro (Round)Mac Pro Server
Its current lineup includes four desktops (the all-in-one iMac and iMac Pro, and the desktop Mac Mini and Mac Pro), and three laptops (the MacBook, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro).
It is a high-end model of the four desktop computers in the current Mac lineup, the other three being the iMac, iMac Pro, and Mac Mini.

Classic Mac OS

Mac OSMacintoshMac
The first versions initially had no name but came to be known as the "Macintosh System Software" in 1988, "Mac OS" in 1997 with the release of Mac OS 7.6, and retrospectively called "Classic Mac OS".
Classic Mac OS is a colloquial term used to describe a series of operating systems developed for the Macintosh family of personal computers by Apple Inc. from 1984 to 2001, starting with System 1 and ending with Mac OS 9.

Macintosh operating systems

MacMacintoshMac OS
Apple has also developed a series of Macintosh operating systems.
The family of Macintosh operating systems developed by Apple Inc. includes the graphical user interface-based operating systems it has designed for use with its Macintosh series of personal computers since 1984, as well as the related system software it once created for compatible third-party systems.

Apple II series

Apple IIAppleApple II compatible
Apple sold the Macintosh alongside its popular Apple II family of computers for almost ten years before they were discontinued in 1993.
With the release of MousePaint in 1984 and the Apple II GS in 1986, the platform took on the look of the Macintosh user interface, including a mouse.

Motorola 68040

6804068LC04068EC040
However, the introduction of Windows 3.1 and Intel's Pentium processor which beat the Motorola 68040 in most benchmarks gradually took market share from Apple, and by the end of 1994 Apple was relegated to third place as Compaq became the top PC manufacturer.
In Apple Macintosh computers, the 68040 was introduced in the Macintosh Quadra, which was named for the chip.

MacOS Mojave

macOS 10.1410.14macOS 10.14 "Mojave
The current version is macOS Mojave, released on September 24, 2018.
macOS Mojave (version 10.14) is the fifteenth major release of macOS, Apple Inc.'s desktop operating system for Macintosh computers.

A/UX

A/UX 3.0
Apple also produced a Unix-based operating system for the Macintosh called A/UX from 1988 to 1995, which closely resembled contemporary versions of the Macintosh system software.
A/UX is a discontinued Apple Computer implementation of the Unix operating system for some of its Macintosh computers.

Macintosh Color Classic

Color ClassicMacintosh Color Classic IIPerforma 250
In the early 1990s, Apple introduced models such as the Macintosh LC II and Color Classic which were price-competitive with Wintel machines at the time.
The Color Classic is the final model of the original "compact" family of Macintosh computers, and was replaced by the larger-display Macintosh LC 500 series and Power Macintosh 5200 LC.

Jef Raskin

Cognetics
The Macintosh project began in 1979 when Jef Raskin, an Apple employee, envisioned an easy-to-use, low-cost computer for the average consumer.
Jef Raskin (born Jeff Raskin; March 9, 1943 – February 26, 2005) was an American human–computer interface expert best known for conceiving and starting the Macintosh project at Apple in the late 1970s.

Microsoft Windows

WindowsPCWin
Intel-based Macs are capable of running non-Apple operating systems such as Linux, OpenBSD, and Microsoft Windows with the aid of Boot Camp or third-party software.
Apple came to see Windows as an unfair encroachment on their innovation in GUI development as implemented on products such as the Lisa and Macintosh (eventually settled in court in Microsoft's favor in 1993).

IMac Pro

iMac Pro 2017
Its current lineup includes four desktops (the all-in-one iMac and iMac Pro, and the desktop Mac Mini and Mac Pro), and three laptops (the MacBook, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro).
Unlike the Mac Pro, Apple claims the iMac Pro is the most powerful Mac ever made.

IBM Personal Computer

IBM PCPCPCs
Early Macintosh models were expensive, hindering its competitiveness in a market already dominated by the Commodore 64 for consumers, as well as the IBM Personal Computer and its accompanying clone market for businesses.
"IBM compatible" became an important criterion for sales growth; after the 1980s, only the Apple Macintosh family kept a significant share of the microcomputer market without compatibility with the IBM personal computer.

Byte (magazine)

ByteByte'' magazineByte magazine
(A 1984 Byte Magazine article suggested Apple changed the spelling only after "early users" misspelled "McIntosh".
Whereas many magazines from the mid-1980s had been dedicated to the MS-DOS (PC) platform or the Mac, mostly from a business or home user's perspective, Byte covered developments in the entire field of "small computers and software", and sometimes other computing fields such as supercomputers and high-reliability computing.

Hackintosh

Chameleon bootloaderDUEThackintosh" computers
Since Apple's transition to Intel processors, there is a sizeable community around the world that specialises in hacking macOS to run on non-Apple computers, which are called "Hackintoshes".
The name is a portmanteau of the words "hack" and Macintosh, the brand name of laptop and desktop computers made by Apple, Inc.

Wintel

PCdominated much of the personal computer marketIntel-based computers
In the early 1990s, Apple introduced models such as the Macintosh LC II and Color Classic which were price-competitive with Wintel machines at the time.
Of those systems, Apple's Macintosh is the only one remaining on the market (and all Macintoshes since December 2006 are, in fact, Wintel-compatible, at the hardware level, at least).

Joanna Hoffman

His initial team would eventually consist of himself, Howard, Joanna Hoffman, Burrell Smith, and Bud Tribble.
She was one of the original members of both the Apple Computer Macintosh team and the NeXT team.