Magellan (spacecraft)

MagellanMagellan'' spacecraftMagellan'' (spacecraft)Magellan orbiterMagellan probe MagellanMagellan space probeMagellan spacecraftMagellan Venus-exploration spacecraftMagellan'' probe
The Magellan spacecraft, also referred to as the Venus Radar Mapper, was a 1035 kg robotic space probe launched by NASA of the United States, on May 4, 1989, to map the surface of Venus by using synthetic aperture radar and to measure the planetary gravitational field.wikipedia
201 Related Articles

Inertial Upper Stage

IUS
The Magellan probe was the first interplanetary mission to be launched from the Space Shuttle, the first one to use the Inertial Upper Stage booster for launching, and the first spacecraft to test aerobraking as a method for circularizing its orbit.

Aerobraking

aerobrakeaerodynamic brakingatmospheric entry
The Magellan probe was the first interplanetary mission to be launched from the Space Shuttle, the first one to use the Inertial Upper Stage booster for launching, and the first spacecraft to test aerobraking as a method for circularizing its orbit.
In May 1993, aerobraking was used during the extended Venusian mission of the Magellan spacecraft.

Space Shuttle

Shuttlespace shuttlesSpace Shuttle Program
The Magellan probe was the first interplanetary mission to be launched from the Space Shuttle, the first one to use the Inertial Upper Stage booster for launching, and the first spacecraft to test aerobraking as a method for circularizing its orbit.

Synthetic-aperture radar

synthetic aperture radarSARsynthetic aperture
The Magellan spacecraft, also referred to as the Venus Radar Mapper, was a 1035 kg robotic space probe launched by NASA of the United States, on May 4, 1989, to map the surface of Venus by using synthetic aperture radar and to measure the planetary gravitational field.
The Venera 15 and Venera 16 followed later by the Magellan space probe mapped the surface of Venus over several years using synthetic aperture radar.

Jet Propulsion Laboratory

JPLNASA Jet Propulsion LaboratoryJet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
The spacecraft was designed and built by the Martin Marietta Company, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) managed the mission for NASA.
Magellen probe

RCA 1802

1802CDP 1802B 5V7RCA (CDP)1802
The computing system on the spacecraft, partially modified equipment from the Galileo, included two ATAC-16 computers, as one redundant system, located in the attitude-control subsystem, and four RCA 1802 microprocessors, as two redundant systems, to control the command and data subsystem (CDS).
The 1802 has also been verified from NASA source documentation to have been used in the Hubble Space Telescope, the Magellan Venus probe and others.

Ferdinand Magellan

MagellanFernão de MagalhãesFernando de Magallanes
In 1985, the mission was renamed Magellan, in honor of the sixteenth-century Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan, known for his exploration, mapping, and circumnavigation of the Earth.
The Magellan probe, which mapped the planet Venus from 1990 to 1994, was named after Magellan.

Martin Marietta

Martin Marietta CorporationMartin Marietta Energy SystemsMartin Marietta Materials
The spacecraft was designed and built by the Martin Marietta Company, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) managed the mission for NASA.
Magellan (spacecraft)

Venus Orbiting Imaging Radar

VOIR
They first sought to construct a spacecraft named the Venus Orbiting Imaging Radar (VOIR), but it became clear that the mission would be beyond the budget constraints during the ensuing years.
In 1983, it was replaced by a less ambitious mission called the Venus Radar Mapper, which was later renamed Magellan.

Space Shuttle Atlantis

AtlantisSpace Shuttle ''AtlantisSpace Shuttle '' Atlantis
Magellan was launched on May 4, 1989, at 18:46:59 UTC by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration from KSC Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis during mission STS-30.
Two of these, both flown in 1989, deployed the planetary probes Magellan to Venus (on STS-30) and Galileo to Jupiter (on STS-34).

STS-30

30
Magellan was launched on May 4, 1989, at 18:46:59 UTC by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration from KSC Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis during mission STS-30.
During the mission, Atlantis deployed the Venus-bound Magellan probe into orbit.

Atmosphere of Venus

atmosphereVenusVenusian atmosphere
Thick and opaque, the atmosphere of Venus required a method beyond optical survey, to map the surface of the planet.
It is located slightly above 50 km. According to measurements by the Magellan and Venus Express probes, the altitude from 52.5 to 54 km has a temperature between 293 K (20 °C) and 310 K (37 °C), and the altitude at 49.5 km above the surface is where the pressure becomes the same as Earth at sea level.

Geology of Venus

Venus' surfacegeological eventsMermaid Plain
Study of the Magellan high-resolution global images is providing evidence to better understand Venusian geology and the role of impacts, volcanism, and tectonics in the formation of Venusian surface structures.
The altimetry experiment of Magellan confirmed the general character of the landscape.

Venus

Morning Starevening starCytherocentric
The Magellan spacecraft, also referred to as the Venus Radar Mapper, was a 1035 kg robotic space probe launched by NASA of the United States, on May 4, 1989, to map the surface of Venus by using synthetic aperture radar and to measure the planetary gravitational field.
Venus's thick clouds render observation of its surface impossible in visible light, and the first detailed maps did not emerge until the arrival of the Magellan orbiter in 1991.

Centaur (rocket stage)

CentaurCentaur upper stageCentaur-G
Magellan was planned to be launched with a liquid-fueled, Centaur-G upper-stage booster, carried in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle.
A shortened version of the Centaur-G was planned to be used on shuttles carrying payloads for the U.S. Department of Defense and for boosting the Magellan probe to Venus.

NASA

National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationNational Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)space program
The Magellan spacecraft, also referred to as the Venus Radar Mapper, was a 1035 kg robotic space probe launched by NASA of the United States, on May 4, 1989, to map the surface of Venus by using synthetic aperture radar and to measure the planetary gravitational field. Magellan was launched on May 4, 1989, at 18:46:59 UTC by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration from KSC Launch Complex 39B at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis during mission STS-30.

List of missions to Venus

List of Venus Misisons
List of missions to Venus

Hughes Aircraft Company

HughesHughes AircraftHughes Space and Communications
Magellan (spacecraft)

Robotic spacecraft

roboticunmanned space missionprobe
The Magellan spacecraft, also referred to as the Venus Radar Mapper, was a 1035 kg robotic space probe launched by NASA of the United States, on May 4, 1989, to map the surface of Venus by using synthetic aperture radar and to measure the planetary gravitational field.

Space probe

probespace probesprobes
The Magellan spacecraft, also referred to as the Venus Radar Mapper, was a 1035 kg robotic space probe launched by NASA of the United States, on May 4, 1989, to map the surface of Venus by using synthetic aperture radar and to measure the planetary gravitational field.

Gravitational field

gravitationalgravitational fieldsgravity field
The Magellan spacecraft, also referred to as the Venus Radar Mapper, was a 1035 kg robotic space probe launched by NASA of the United States, on May 4, 1989, to map the surface of Venus by using synthetic aperture radar and to measure the planetary gravitational field.

Gal (unit)

galmGalmilligal
Obtain near-global gravity field data with 700 km resolution and two to three milligals of accuracy.

Galileo (spacecraft)

GalileoGalileo'' spacecraftGalileo spacecraft
The computing system on the spacecraft, partially modified equipment from the Galileo, included two ATAC-16 computers, as one redundant system, located in the attitude-control subsystem, and four RCA 1802 microprocessors, as two redundant systems, to control the command and data subsystem (CDS). To save costs, most of the Magellan probe was made up of spare parts from various missions, including the Voyager program, Galileo, Ulysses, and Mariner 9.

Ulysses (spacecraft)

UlyssesUlysses'' spacecraftUlysses mission
To save costs, most of the Magellan probe was made up of spare parts from various missions, including the Voyager program, Galileo, Ulysses, and Mariner 9.

Mariner 9

Mariner 99first spacecraft to orbit Mars
To save costs, most of the Magellan probe was made up of spare parts from various missions, including the Voyager program, Galileo, Ulysses, and Mariner 9.