Magic Johnson

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Earvin "Magic" Johnson Jr. (born August 14, 1959) is an American retired professional basketball player and former president of basketball operations of the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association (NBA).wikipedia
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Los Angeles Lakers

Minneapolis LakersL.A. LakersLakers
Earvin "Magic" Johnson Jr. (born August 14, 1959) is an American retired professional basketball player and former president of basketball operations of the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association (NBA).
The 1980s Lakers were nicknamed "Showtime" due to their fast break-offense led by Magic Johnson.

1979 NBA draft

19791979 second-round draft pickin 1979
After winning championships in high school and college, Johnson was selected first overall in the 1979 NBA draft by the Lakers.
Magic Johnson from Michigan State University, one of the "hardship" players, was selected first overall by the Los Angeles Lakers.

NBA Finals Most Valuable Player Award

NBA Finals MVPFinals MVPNBA Finals Most Valuable Player
He won a championship and an NBA Finals Most Valuable Player Award in his rookie season, and won four more championships with the Lakers during the 1980s.
Magic Johnson, Shaquille O'Neal, Tim Duncan and LeBron James won the award three times in their careers.

1992 NBA All-Star Game

19921992 All-Star GameNBA All-Star Game
Johnson retired abruptly in 1991 after announcing that he had contracted HIV, but returned to play in the 1992 All-Star Game, winning the All-Star MVP Award.
The game is most remembered for the return of Los Angeles Lakers legend Magic Johnson, who retired before the 1991–92 NBA season after contracting HIV.

NBA All-Star Game Most Valuable Player Award

NBA All-Star Game MVPMVPAll-Star Game Most Valuable Player
Johnson retired abruptly in 1991 after announcing that he had contracted HIV, but returned to play in the 1992 All-Star Game, winning the All-Star MVP Award.
Oscar Robertson, Michael Jordan, Shaquille O'Neal, and LeBron James have each won the award three times, while Bob Cousy, Julius Erving, Isiah Thomas, Magic Johnson, Karl Malone, Allen Iverson, Russell Westbrook, and Kevin Durant have all won the award twice.

1979 NCAA Division I Basketball Tournament

19791979 edition1979 NCAA Tournament
His friendship and rivalry with Boston Celtics star Larry Bird, whom he faced in the 1979 NCAA finals and three NBA championship series, are well documented. During the 1978–79 season, Michigan State again qualified for the NCAA Tournament, where they advanced to the championship game and faced Indiana State, which was led by senior Larry Bird.
Magic Johnson of Michigan State was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player.

NBA Finals

NBA championshipNBA championshipsFinals
Johnson's career achievements include three NBA MVP Awards, nine NBA Finals appearances, twelve All-Star games, and ten All-NBA First and Second Team nominations.
The 1979 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship Game featured Magic Johnson's Michigan State University team facing off against Larry Bird's Indiana State University team.

McDonald's All-American Game

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Johnson, who finished his high school career with two All-State selections, was considered at the time to be the best high school player ever to come out of Michigan and was also named to the 1977 McDonald's All-American team.

Michigan State Spartans men's basketball

Michigan StateMichigan State SpartansMichigan State University
His college decision came down to Michigan and Michigan State in East Lansing.
The 1979 National Championship team was coached by Jud Heathcote and included tournament MVP Magic Johnson, Greg Kelser and Jay Vincent.

National Basketball Association

NBANBA.comBasketball Association of America
Earvin "Magic" Johnson Jr. (born August 14, 1959) is an American retired professional basketball player and former president of basketball operations of the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association (NBA).
That same year, rookies Larry Bird and Magic Johnson joined the Boston Celtics and Los Angeles Lakers respectively, initiating a period of significant growth in fan interest in the NBA.

Jud Heathcote

He ultimately decided to attend Michigan State when coach Jud Heathcote told him he could play the point guard position.
Heathcote coached Magic Johnson during his two years at Michigan State, concluding with the 1979 national championship season.

1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team

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Johnson was a member of the 1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team ("The Dream Team"), which won the Olympic gold medal in 1992.
The first ten players for the team were officially selected on September 21, 1991: Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen of the Chicago Bulls, John Stockton and Karl Malone of the Utah Jazz, Magic Johnson of the Los Angeles Lakers, Larry Bird of the Boston Celtics, Patrick Ewing of the New York Knicks, Chris Mullin of the Golden State Warriors, David Robinson of the San Antonio Spurs, and Charles Barkley of the Philadelphia 76ers.

Boston Celtics

BostonCelticsBoston Celtic
His friendship and rivalry with Boston Celtics star Larry Bird, whom he faced in the 1979 NCAA finals and three NBA championship series, are well documented.
Bird renewed his college rivalry with Lakers star Magic Johnson during this series.

List of first overall NBA draft picks

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Johnson was drafted first overall in 1979 by the Los Angeles Lakers.
Eleven first picks have won the NBA Most Valuable Player Award: Oscar Robertson, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (record six-time winner), Bill Walton, Magic Johnson (three-time winner), Hakeem Olajuwon, David Robinson, Shaquille O'Neal, Allen Iverson, Tim Duncan (two-time winner), LeBron James (four-time winner), and Derrick Rose (youngest winner).

Larry Bird

BirdDrive: The Story of My Life[Larry] Bird
His friendship and rivalry with Boston Celtics star Larry Bird, whom he faced in the 1979 NCAA finals and three NBA championship series, are well documented. During the 1978–79 season, Michigan State again qualified for the NCAA Tournament, where they advanced to the championship game and faced Indiana State, which was led by senior Larry Bird.
The game achieved the highest ever television rating for a college basketball game, in large part because of the matchup between Bird and Spartans' point guard Earvin "Magic" Johnson, a rivalry that lasted throughout their professional careers.

1979–80 Los Angeles Lakers season

Los AngelesLos Angeles LakersLAL
Johnson was drafted first overall in 1979 by the Los Angeles Lakers.
The highlight of the Los Angeles Lakers season of 1979–80 was rookie Magic Johnson leading the Lakers to their seventh NBA Championship, defeating the Philadelphia 76ers in six games in the NBA Finals.

1978–79 Indiana State Sycamores men's basketball team

Indiana StateIndiana State Sycamores1978–79 Indiana State Sycamores
During the 1978–79 season, Michigan State again qualified for the NCAA Tournament, where they advanced to the championship game and faced Indiana State, which was led by senior Larry Bird.
He led an undefeated team to the national title game versus a Magic Johnson-led Michigan State Spartans team, and ended the season as National Runner-Up with a record of 33–1.

Everett High School (Michigan)

Everett High SchoolEverettLansing Everett High School
His plans underwent a dramatic change when he learned that he would be bused to the predominantly white Everett High School instead of going to Sexton, which was predominantly black.
Everett's most famous alumnus is Earvin "Magic" Johnson, former Michigan State and LA Lakers basketball player, who graduated from Everett in 1977.

Basketball at the 1992 Summer Olympics

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Johnson was a member of the 1992 United States men's Olympic basketball team ("The Dream Team"), which won the Olympic gold medal in 1992.

Jay Vincent

Playing with future NBA draftees Greg Kelser, Jay Vincent and Mike Brkovich, Johnson averaged 17.0 points, 7.9 rebounds, and 7.4 assists per game as a freshman, and led the Spartans to a 25–5 record, the Big Ten Conference title, and a berth in the 1978 NCAA Tournament.
A 6'7" forward, Vincent played at Michigan State University under coach, Jud Heathcote, where he teamed with Magic Johnson and Greg Kelser to win the 1979 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. Vincent won the Big Ten scoring championship in his junior and senior years. He was then selected by the Dallas Mavericks in the second round of the 1981 NBA draft (24th overall pick), and he went on to have a productive 9-year NBA career, playing for the Mavericks (1981–86), Washington Bullets (1986–87), Denver Nuggets (1987–89), San Antonio Spurs (1989), Philadelphia 76ers (1989–1990) and Los Angeles Lakers (1990). He concluded his NBA career in 1990 with 8,729 career points, 3,167 career rebounds, and 1,124 career assists.

Paul Westhead

LMU Coach
Coach Paul Westhead, who had replaced McKinney early in the season after he suffered a near-fatal bicycle accident, decided to start Johnson at center in Game 6; Johnson recorded 42 points, 15 rebounds, 7 assists, and 3 steals in a 123–107 win, while playing guard, forward, and center at different times during the game.
In his first year as an NBA head coach, he led a rookie Magic Johnson and the Los Angeles Lakers to the 1980 NBA Title.

Point guard

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He ultimately decided to attend Michigan State when coach Jud Heathcote told him he could play the point guard position. He played point guard for the Lakers for 13 seasons.
Behind him is Magic Johnson, who at 6’ 9” (2.06 m) won the National Basketball Association Most Valuable Player Award three times in his career.

1979 NCAA Division I Basketball Championship Game

1979championship gameNational Championship
During the 1978–79 season, Michigan State again qualified for the NCAA Tournament, where they advanced to the championship game and faced Indiana State, which was led by senior Larry Bird.
Spartans guard Magic Johnson and Sycamores forward Larry Bird competed against each other for the first time; the pair developed a rivalry in the National Basketball Association (NBA) in the 1980s.

UCLA Bruins men's basketball

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Although Johnson was recruited by several top-ranked colleges such as Indiana and UCLA, he decided to play close to home.
He had recruited Earvin "Magic" Johnson to come play at UCLA, but then told Johnson to hold off on a visit as he was more interested in Albert King.

1978 NCAA Division I Basketball Tournament

19781978 NCAA TournamentNCAA Tournament
Playing with future NBA draftees Greg Kelser, Jay Vincent and Mike Brkovich, Johnson averaged 17.0 points, 7.9 rebounds, and 7.4 assists per game as a freshman, and led the Spartans to a 25–5 record, the Big Ten Conference title, and a berth in the 1978 NCAA Tournament.
In the Mideast regional final, Kentucky knocked off top-seeded Michigan State, led by freshman Earvin "Magic" Johnson.