Mahabharata

MahābhārataMahabharatMahabharathaThe MahabharataMahabarathaMahabhartaMahabharathamMahabharatamMahabarataMahabhārata
The Mahābhārata is one of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India, the other being the Rāmāyaṇa.wikipedia
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Ramayana

RamayanValmiki RamayanaRāmāyaṇa
The Mahābhārata is one of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India, the other being the Rāmāyaṇa.
Ramayana is one of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India, the other being the Mahābhārata.

Kurukshetra War

Mahabharata warBattle of KurukshetraKurukshetra
It narrates the struggle between two groups of cousins in the Kurukshetra War and the fates of the Kaurava and the Pāṇḍava princes and their succession.
The Kurukshetra War, also called the Mahabharata War, is a war described in the Indian epic poem Mahābhārata.

Itihasa

ItihasasEpicsItihāsa
Along with the epic Rāmāyaṇa, it forms the Hindu Itihasa.
Itihasa (Sanskrit: इतिहास), meaning "history" (iti ha āsa, literally “so indeed it was”), includes the Mahabharata, the Ramayana, and sometimes the Puranas.

Indian epic poetry

Hindu epicepicIndian epic
The Mahābhārata is one of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India, the other being the Rāmāyaṇa.
The Ramayana and the Mahabharata, which were originally composed in Sanskrit and later translated into many other Indian languages, and The Five Great Epics of Tamil Literature and Sangam literature are some of the oldest surviving epic poems ever written.

Vyasa

Krishna Dwaipayana VyasaVeda VyasaVedavyasa
Traditionally, the authorship of the Mahābhārata is attributed to Vyāsa.
Vyasa (व्यास, literally "Compiler") is the legendary author of the Mahabharata, Vedas and Puranas, some of the most important works in the Hindu tradition.

Bhagavad Gita

GitaBhagavad-GitaBhagvad Gita
Among the principal works and stories in the Mahābhārata are the Bhagavad Gita, the story of Damayanti, an abbreviated version of the Rāmāyaṇa, and the story of Ṛṣyasringa, often considered as works in their own right.
The Bhagavad Gita (भागवत गीता, IAST: ', lit. "The Song of God"), often referred to as the Gita', is a 700-verse Sanskrit scripture that is part of the Hindu epic Mahabharata'' (chapters 23–40 of Bhishma Parva).

Gupta Empire

GuptaGupta periodGuptas
The text probably reached its final form by the early Gupta period (c.
The high points of this period are the great cultural developments which took place primarily during the reigns of Samudragupta, Chandragupta II and Kumaragupta I. Many of the literary sources, such as Mahabharata and Ramayana, were canonised during this period.

Arjuna

ArjunDhananjayDhananjaya
It is first recited at Takshashila by the sage Vaiśampāyana, a disciple of Vyāsa, to the King Janamejaya who is the great-grandson of the Pāṇḍava prince Arjuna.
Arjuna (Sanskrit: अर्जुन, IAST: ) is a central character of the Indian epic Mahabharata.

History of India

ancient IndiaIndiaIndian history
The Mahābhārata is one of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India, the other being the Rāmāyaṇa.
The Sanskrit epics Ramayana and Mahabharata were composed during this period.

Story within a story

film within a filmshow-within-a-showplay within a play
The epic employs the story within a story structure, otherwise known as frametales, popular in many Indian religious and non-religious works.
In the epic Mahabharata, the Kurukshetra War is narrated by a character in Vyasa's Jaya, which itself is narrated by a character in Vaisampayana's Bharata, which itself is narrated by a character in Ugrasrava's Mahabharata.

Kaurava

KauravasKauravChitra
It narrates the struggle between two groups of cousins in the Kurukshetra War and the fates of the Kaurava and the Pāṇḍava princes and their succession.
Kaurava is a Sanskrit term for the descendants of King Kuru (or simply Kurava in Tamil), a legendary king who is the ancestor of many of the characters of the Mahābhārata.

Vaisampayana

VaishampayanaVaiśampāyana
It is first recited at Takshashila by the sage Vaiśampāyana, a disciple of Vyāsa, to the King Janamejaya who is the great-grandson of the Pāṇḍava prince Arjuna.
Vaishampayana was the traditional narrator of the Mahabharata, one of the two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India from Takshashila, modern-day Taxila, Pakistan, where he narrated the epic poem for the first time.

Shloka

slokasslokaśloka
Its longest version consists of over 100,000 śloka or over 200,000 individual verse lines (each shloka is a couplet), and long prose passages.
The Mahabharata and Ramayana, for example, are written almost exclusively in shlokas.

Kālidāsa

KalidasaKalidasKalidas’
For instance, Abhijñānaśākuntala by the renowned Sanskrit poet Kālidāsa (c.
His plays and poetry are primarily based on the Vedas, the Ramayana, the Mahabharata and the Puranas.

Adi Parva

AdiparvaAdhi ParwamAdi
The Adi Parva or The Book of the Beginning is the first of eighteen books of the Mahabharata.

Ugrashravas

Ugrasrava SautiSutaSri Suta Goswami
The story is then recited again by a professional storyteller named Ugraśrava Sauti, many years later, to an assemblage of sages performing the 12-year sacrifice for the king Saunaka Kulapati in the Naimiśa Forest.
Ugrashravas (Sanskrit: उग्रश्रवस्, also Ugraśravas, Sauti, Sūta, Śri Sūta, Suta Goswami) was the narrator of several Puranas, including Mahābhārata, Bhagavata Purana, Harivamsa, and Padma Purana, with the narrations typically taking place before the sages gathered in Naimisha Forest.

Damayanti

DamayanthiDamajantiDamyanti
Among the principal works and stories in the Mahābhārata are the Bhagavad Gita, the story of Damayanti, an abbreviated version of the Rāmāyaṇa, and the story of Ṛṣyasringa, often considered as works in their own right.
Damayanti (Sanskrit: दमयंती) is a character in a love story found in the Vana Parva book of the Mahabharata.

Fifth Veda

Pranava Veda
Within the Indian tradition it is sometimes called the fifth Veda.
This reference to itihasa was used by the Mahabharata, which belonged to the class of epic literature called "itihasa", to refer to itself as the fifth Veda.

Satna

Karigohi (Madhya Pradesh)
The copper-plate inscription of the Maharaja Sharvanatha (533–534 CE) from Khoh (Satna District, Madhya Pradesh) describes the Mahābhārata as a "collection of 100,000 verses" (śata-sahasri saṃhitā).
The Mahabharata associates this site with rulers of the Haihaya, Kalchuri or Chedi clans.

Yudhishthira

YudhisthiraYudhishtraYudhishthir
Although the Kaurava is the senior branch of the family, Duryodhana, the eldest Kaurava, is younger than Yudhishthira, the eldest Pandava.
In the Hindu epic Mahabharata, Yudhishthira (Sanskrit: युधिष्ठिर, IAST: Yudhiṣṭhira) was the eldest son of King Pandu and Queen Kunti and the king of Indraprastha and later of Hastinapura (Kuru).

Rishi

Rishissageṛṣi
Rishis have composed hymns of the Shrutis (Vedas) and Smritis (Upanishads, Ramayan and Mahabharat).

Sabha Parva

Next book of ''Mahabharata'': Sabha ParvaPrevious book of Mahabharata: Sabha ParvaSabhaparvan
Sabha Parva, also called the "Book of the Assembly Hall", is the second of eighteen books of Mahabharata.

Vana Parva

Aranya Parvathird book12 years of exile
Vana Parva or Aranya Parva, also known as the "Book of the Forest", is the third of eighteen parvas of the Indian epic Mahabharata.

Shakuntala (play)

AbhijñānaśākuntalamShakuntalaAbhijñānaśākuntala
For instance, Abhijñānaśākuntala by the renowned Sanskrit poet Kālidāsa (c.
Shakuntala, also known as The Recognition of Shakuntala, The Sign of Shakuntala, and many other variants (Devanagari: अभिज्ञानशाकुन्तलम्, IAST: Abhijñānaśākuntalam), is a Sanskrit play by the ancient Indian poet Kālidāsa, dramatizing the story of Shakuntala told in the epic Mahabharata.

Bhishma

BheeshmaBhismaDevavrata
King Janamejaya's ancestor Shantanu, the king of Hastinapura, has a short-lived marriage with the goddess Ganga and has a son, Devavrata (later to be called Bhishma, a great warrior), who becomes the heir apparent.
In the Mahabharata, Bhishma (Sanskrit: भीष्‍म) was well known for his pledge of Celibacy.