A report on Peshwa and Mahadaji Shinde

Mahadaji Shinde by James Wales
Extent of the Maratha Confederacy, 1795
Mahadaji Scindia entertaining British officers with a nautch
Statue of Balaji Vishwanath, the first Peshwa from the Bhat family, at Shrivardhan, Raigad district, Maharashtra, India.
Shinde Chhatri, Wanawdi, Pune: A memorial dedicated to Mahadji Shinde
Statue of Bajirao I, the second Peshwa from the Bhat family, outside Shaniwar Wada, Pune, Maharashtra, India.
Shaniwar Wada's Delhi Gate. It was the seat of the Peshwas at Pune, Maharashtra, India.
His Highness Shrimant Sawai Madhavrao Peshwa or Madhav Rao II Narayan and his Prime minister Nana Phadnavis, with two attendants at Pune.

Mahadaji was instrumental in resurrecting Maratha power in North India after the Third Battle of Panipat in 1761, and rose to become a trusted lieutenant of the Peshwa, leader of the Maratha Empire.

- Mahadaji Shinde

Mahadaji Shinde

- Peshwa

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Maratha Empire

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Early modern Indian confederation that came to dominate much of the Indian subcontinent in the 18th century.

Early modern Indian confederation that came to dominate much of the Indian subcontinent in the 18th century.

The Maratha Empire in 1758 with the Nizam of Hyderabad and the Mughal Empire as its vassals
Maratha Empire at its peak in 1760 (Yellow)
Maratha kingdom in 1680 (yellow)
A portrait of Shivaji Maharaj
Sambhaji, eldest son of Shivaji
Peshwa Balaji Vishwanath
Peshwa Baji Rao I
Peshwa Balaji Bajirao
Peshwa Madhavrao I
Mahadaji Shinde restored the Maratha domination of northern India
A mural depicting the British surrender during the First Anglo-Maratha War. The mural is a part of the Victory Memorial (Vijay Stambh) located at Vadgaon Maval, Pune.
Peshwa Madhavrao II in his court in 1790, concluding a treaty with the British
Battle of Assaye during the Second Anglo-Maratha War
Peshwa Baji Rao II signing of the Treaty of Bassein with the British
Maratha king of Gwalior at his palace
Pratapgad fort, one of the earliest forts administered by Shivaji.
Maratha darbar or court.
Gold coins minted during Shivaji's era, 17th century.
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Maratha Gurabs ships attacking a British East India Company ship
Arms of Maratha
Ramchandra Pant Amatya
Thanjavur Maratha palace
Maratha Empire at its peak in 1759 (orange)
Maratha Empire in 1760 (yellow)
Maratha Empire in 1765 (yellow)
Maratha Empire in 1795 (yellow)
Maratha Empire in 1805
Maratha Princely States in 1823

The empire had its head in the Chhatrapati as de jure, but the de facto governance was in the hands of the Peshwas after Chhatrapati Shahu I's reign.

Under the leadership of Mahadji Shinde, the ruler of the state of Gwalior in central India, the Marathas defeated the Jats, the Rohilla Afghans and took Delhi which remained under Maratha control for the next three decades. His forces conquered modern day Haryana. Shinde was instrumental in resurrecting Maratha power after the débâcle of the Third Battle of Panipat, and in this he was assisted by Benoît de Boigne.

Portrait of Nana Phadnavis by John Thomas Seton

Nana Fadnavis

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Portrait of Nana Phadnavis by John Thomas Seton
Nana Fadnavis
Peshwa Madhav Rao Narayan with Nana Fadnavis
Capture of Nana Fadnavis
Rear entrance to Nana Phadanvis' house (Nana phadanvis wada), which is still preserved today in the same condition as when Nana built it in 1780. Location: Menawali near Wai in Satara district of Maharashtra
Nana Fadnavis Wada

Nana Fadnavis (Pronunciation: [naːna pʰəɖɳəʋiːs, fəɖ-]; also Phadnavis and Furnuwees and abbreviated as Phadnis) (February 12, 1742 – March 13, 1800), born Balaji Janardan Bhanu, was an influential minister and statesman of the Maratha Empire during the Peshwa administration in Pune, India.

Other members of the council were Haripant Phadke, Moroba Phadnis, Sakaram Bapu Bokil, Trimbakraomama Pethe, Mahadji Shinde, Tukojirao Holkar, Phaltankar, Bhagwanrao Pratinidhi, Maloji Ghorpade, Sardar Raste, and Babuji Naik.

c. 1770 Faizabad-style painting of the Third Battle of Panipat; the centre of the image is dominated by the twin arcs of the lines of guns firing at each other with smoke and destruction in between.

Third Battle of Panipat

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The Third Battle of Panipat took place on 14 January 1761 between the Maratha Empire and the invading army of the Durrani Afghan Empire.

The Third Battle of Panipat took place on 14 January 1761 between the Maratha Empire and the invading army of the Durrani Afghan Empire.

c. 1770 Faizabad-style painting of the Third Battle of Panipat; the centre of the image is dominated by the twin arcs of the lines of guns firing at each other with smoke and destruction in between.
Extent of the Maratha Empire, 1760
Sadashivrao Bhau
Engraving of a Maratha soldier by James Forbes.
Portrait of Ahmad Shah Durrani
Plan of the Third Battle of Panipat based on Kashi raja (Casi Raja) Pandit's account
Mahadaji Shinde restored Maratha domination over northern India, within a decade after the war.
Map of India in 1765, before the fall of Nawabs and Princely states nominally allied to the emperor (mainly in Green).

The Maratha army was led by Sadashivrao Bhau, who was third-highest authority of the Maratha Empire after the Chhatrapati and the Peshwa.

In 1771, ten years after Panipat, Mahadji Shinde led a large Maratha army into northern India in a punitive expedition which re-established Maratha domination in that area and punished refractory powers that had either sided with the Afghans, such as the Rohillas, or had shaken off Maratha domination after Panipat.

Maratha Sardar Ranoji Scindia

Scindia

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Hindu Maratha dynasty of Kunbi origin that ruled the erstwhile State of Gwalior.

Hindu Maratha dynasty of Kunbi origin that ruled the erstwhile State of Gwalior.

Maratha Sardar Ranoji Scindia
The Maharaja of Gwalior Before His Palace
Shinde Chhatri, Wanawdi, Pune: A memorial dedicated to Mahadji Shinde
Mahadaji Shinde was instrumental in resurrecting Maratha power in North India after the Battle of Panipat in 1761

Peshwa Baji Rao's career saw the strengthening of the Maratha Empire.

His successors included Jayajirao, Jyotibarao, Dattajirao, Jankojirao, Mahadji Shinde and Daulatrao Scindia.The Scindias became a major regional power in the latter half of the 18th century, and figured prominently in the three Anglo-Maratha Wars.They held sway over many of the Rajput states, and conquered north India.