A report on Maharaja

Chamarajendra Wadiyar X, the Maharaja of Mysore (1885)
Durbar of Pudukkottai Maharaja with British officials.
Maharaja Jaswant Singh II of Marwar, c. 1880. Attributed to Narsingh. The Brooklyn Museum.
Chhatrapati Shivaji Raje Bhosale. The Maratha king preferred the title of Chhatrapati as against Maharaja and was the founder and sovereign of the Maratha Empire of India
Sri Panch Bada Mahārājādhirāja Prithvi Narayan Shah Dev of Nepal.
His Highness Maharajadhiraj Mirza Maharao Shri Sir Khengarji III Sawai Bahadur, Rao of Kutch, GCIE, KIH
Maharaja Sir Pratap Singh of Jammu and Kashmir
Shree Panch Mahārājādhirāja Rana Bahadur Shah Bahadur Shamsher Jang Devanam Sada Samaravijayinam, Sovereign King of Nepal
Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun, King of Thailand (2016–)
Maharaja Bhagvat-Singh of Gondal.
The Maratha Rajarshi Shahu Chhatrapati Maharaj of Kolhapur.
The Maratha Maharaja Sayajirao Gaekwad III of Baroda.
Chithira Thirunal Balarama Varma, the Maharaja of Travancore
Maharaja Nripendra Narayan of Cooch Behar.
Maharaja Duleep Singh, the last Maharaja of the Sikh Empire.
Maharaja Vikram Dev III of Jeypore Samasthanam Estate, Kalinga.
thumb|Krishnaraja Wadiyar IV, the Maharaja of Mysore

Sanskrit title for a "great ruler", "great king" or "high king".

- Maharaja
Chamarajendra Wadiyar X, the Maharaja of Mysore (1885)

21 related topics with Alpha

Overall

His Highness Sayajirao Gaekwad III Sena Khas Khel Shamsher Bahadur GCSI, GCIE, KIH (21-gun salute) – the Maratha Maharaja of Baroda

Princely state

4 links

Nominally sovereign entity of the British Indian Empire that was not directly governed by the British, but rather by an Indian ruler under a form of indirect rule, subject to a subsidiary alliance and the suzerainty or paramountcy of the British crown.

Nominally sovereign entity of the British Indian Empire that was not directly governed by the British, but rather by an Indian ruler under a form of indirect rule, subject to a subsidiary alliance and the suzerainty or paramountcy of the British crown.

His Highness Sayajirao Gaekwad III Sena Khas Khel Shamsher Bahadur GCSI, GCIE, KIH (21-gun salute) – the Maratha Maharaja of Baroda
An old image of the British Residency in the city of Quilon, Kerala
An 1895 group photograph of the eleven-year-old Krishnaraja Wadiyar IV, ruler of the princely state of Mysore in South India, with his brothers and sisters. In 1799, his grandfather, then aged five, had been granted dominion of Mysore by the British and forced into a subsidiary alliance. The British later directly governed the state between 1831 and 1881.
The Govindgarh Palace of the Maharaja of Rewa. The palace which was built as a hunting lodge later became famous for the first white tigers that were found in the adjacent jungle and raised in the palace zoo.
The Nawab of Junagarh Bahadur Khan III (seated centre in an ornate chair) shown in an 1885 photograph with state officials and family.
Photograph (1900) of the Maharani of Sikkim. Sikkim was under the suzerainty of the Provincial government of Bengal; its ruler received a 15-gun salute.
HH Maharaja Sir Jayaji Rao Scindia of Gwalior State, General Sir Henry Daly (Founder of The Daly College), with British officers and Maratha nobility (Sardars, Jagirdars & Mankaris) in Indore, Holkar State, c. 1879.
Photograph (1894) of the 19-year-old Shahaji II Bhonsle Maharajah of Kolhapur visiting the British resident and his staff at the Residency
Chamber of Princes meeting in March 1941

The Indian rulers bore various titles – including Chhatrapati (exclusively used by the three Bhonsle dynasty of the Marathas) ("emperor"), Maharaja or Raja ("king"), Sultan, Nawab, Emir, Raje, Nizam, Wadiyar (used only by the Maharajas of Mysore, meaning "lord"), Agniraj Maharaj for the rulers of Bhaddaiyan Raj, Chogyal, Nawab ("governor"), Nayak, Wāli, Inamdar, Saranjamdar and many others.

Approximate extent of the Gupta territories (pink) in 375 CE

Gupta Empire

1 links

Ancient Indian empire which existed from the early 4th century CE to late 6th century CE.

Ancient Indian empire which existed from the early 4th century CE to late 6th century CE.

Approximate extent of the Gupta territories (pink) in 375 CE
Gupta script inscription Maharaja Sri Gupta Gupta allahabad m.svg Gupta allahabad haa.jpg Gupta allahabad raa.jpg Gupta allahabad j.svg Gupta allahabad shrii.jpg Gupta allahabad gu.jpg allahabad pt.jpg ("Great King, Lord Gupta"), mentioning the first ruler of the dynasty, king Gupta. Inscription by Samudragupta on the Allahabad pillar, where Samudragupta presents king Gupta as his great-grandfather. Dated circa 350 CE.
Approximate extent of the Gupta territories (pink) in 375 CE
Queen Kumaradevi and King Chandragupta I, depicted on a gold coin.
14px
Standing Buddha in red sandstone, Art of Mathura, Gupta period circa 5th century CE. Mathura Museum.
Gold coins of Chandragupta II.
Sculpture of Vishnu (red sandstone), 5th century CE.
Jain tirthankara relief Parshvanatha on Kahaum pillar erected by Skandagupta
An 8 gm gold coin featuring Chandragupta II astride a caparisoned horse with a bow in his left hand.
Dharmachakra Pravartana Buddha at Sarnath from the Gupta era, 5th century CE.
A tetrastyle prostyle Gupta period temple at Sanchi besides the Apsidal hall with Maurya foundation, an example of Buddhist architecture. 5th century CE.
The current structure of the Mahabodhi Temple dates to the Gupta era, 5th century CE. Marking the location where the Buddha is said to have attained enlightenment.
Dashavatara Temple is a Vishnu Hindu temple built during the Gupta period.
Vishnu reclining on the serpent Shesha (Ananta), Dashavatara Temple 5th century
Buddha from Sarnath, 5–6th century CE
The Colossal trimurti at the Elephanta Caves
Painting of Padmapani Cave 1 at Ajanta
The Shiva mukhalinga (faced-lingam) from the Bhumara Temple
Nalrajar Garh fortification wall in Chilapata Forests, West Bengal, is one of the last surviving fortification remains from the Gupta period ,currently 5–7 m high
Nalanda university was first established under Gupta empire
Bitargaon temple from the Gupta period provide one of the earliest examples of pointed arches anywhere in the world
Ajanta caves from Gupta era
Krishna fighting the horse demon Keshi, 5th century
Pataini temple is a Jain temple built during the Gupta period.

In the Allahabad Pillar inscription, Gupta and his successor Ghatotkacha are described as Maharaja ("great king"), while the next king Chandragupta I is called a Maharajadhiraja ("king of great kings").

High king

1 links

King who holds a position of seniority over a group of other kings, without the title of emperor.

King who holds a position of seniority over a group of other kings, without the title of emperor.

The maharaja could possibly be rendered as "high king", although the literal meaning is closer to "emperor".

Robert Clive, meeting with Nawab Mir Jafar after the Battle of Plassey, by Francis Hayman

Nawab

1 links

Nawab (Balochi: نواب; نواب;

Nawab (Balochi: نواب; نواب;

Robert Clive, meeting with Nawab Mir Jafar after the Battle of Plassey, by Francis Hayman
General Nawab Sir Sadeq Mohammad Khan V, the last ruling Nawab of Bahawalpur
The winter diwan of a Mughal nawab
The Procession of Yusef Ali Khan, a painting depicting Yusef Khan on his way to an encampment for the durbar held at Fatehgarh in 1859
A picture of whom is believed to be the first ever "Nawab" of Mughal Empire, "Saadat Ali Khan I" of Awadh.
The Nawab of Bengal, Mir Qasim 1757
Azim-ud-Daula
Hyder Beg Khan of Awadh
Nawabs hunting a blackbuck with their Asiatic cheetah
Nawab of Awadh
Nawabs and cheetahs
Nawab Malik Amir Mohammad Khan The Nawab of Kalabagh and chief of the Awan tribe
Afsharids and a Mughal nawab
Muhammed Ali Khan Wallajah the Nawab of Carnatic
Shuja-ud-Daula the Nawab of Awadh
Shuja-ud-Daula and his sons and relative
Nawabs in battle during the Battle of Panipat (1761)
Nawab of the Carnatic in battle
A nawab, during the reign of the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan
Shuja-ud-Din Muhammad Khan the Nawab of Bengal
Anwaruddin Muhammed Khan the Nawab of the Carnatic
Nawab of Bengal

The title is common among Muslim rulers of South Asia as an equivalent to the title Maharaja.

Maharana

1 links

Variation on the Indian royal title Rana.

Variation on the Indian royal title Rana.

Maharana denotes 'king of kings', similar to the word "Maharaja".

Mahārāja Shrī Gupta Gupta allahabad m.svgGupta allahabad haa.jpgGupta allahabad raa.jpgGupta allahabad j.svgGupta allahabad shrii.jpgGupta allahabad gu.jpg allahabad pt.jpg ("Great King, Lord Gupta") in Gupta script on the Allahabad pillar inscription of Samudragupta, where Samudragupta presents king Gupta as his great-grandfather.

Gupta (king)

1 links

The founder of the Gupta dynasty of northern India.

The founder of the Gupta dynasty of northern India.

Mahārāja Shrī Gupta Gupta allahabad m.svgGupta allahabad haa.jpgGupta allahabad raa.jpgGupta allahabad j.svgGupta allahabad shrii.jpgGupta allahabad gu.jpg allahabad pt.jpg ("Great King, Lord Gupta") in Gupta script on the Allahabad pillar inscription of Samudragupta, where Samudragupta presents king Gupta as his great-grandfather.
14px
12px
11px
11px
11px
12px

The Allahabad Pillar inscription uses the title Maharaja ( "Great King") for Gupta and his son Ghatotkacha, as opposed to the title Maharajadhiraja ("king of great kings") for later ruler Chandragupta I.

The gate of Rajwada, royal palace of the Holkar dynasty, Indore

Holkar

1 links

Maratha clan of Dhangar(Gadariya) origin in India.

Maratha clan of Dhangar(Gadariya) origin in India.

The gate of Rajwada, royal palace of the Holkar dynasty, Indore
Shrimant Bhushansinh Raje Holkar celebrating the titular coronation of Maharaja Yashwantrao Holkar on January 6 at Fort Wafgaon(Maharastra)
Fort Ahilya in Maheshwar
A Statue of Ahilyabai Holkar at Datta Temple
Yashwantrao Holkar.
Tukojirao Holkar II, Indore, from a drawing by Mr. W. Carpenter, Jun.," from the Illustrated London News, 1857
Tukojirao Holkar III Maharaja Holkar of Indore
A silver rupee of Shivajirao Holkar 1886–1903, minted at Indore in Vikram Samvat 1948 (1891)

The Holkars were generals under Peshwa Baji Rao I, and later became Maharajas of Indore in Central India as an independent member of the Maratha Empire until 1818.

The French resident general of Morocco in the 1930s.

Resident minister

1 links

Government official required to take up permanent residence in another country.

Government official required to take up permanent residence in another country.

The French resident general of Morocco in the 1930s.
Nawab Mubarak Ali Khan with his son in the Nawab's Durbar with British Resident, Sir John Hadley
The British Residency at Hyderabad
Governor-General Lord Ranfurly reads the Cook Islands annexation proclamation to Queen Makea, with the British Resident Walter Gudgeon looking on, on 7 October 1900.
The house of a Dutch resident in Central Java c. 1905

in Nepal since 1802, accredited to the Hindu Kings (title Maharajadhiraja), since 15 March 1816 exercising a de facto protectorate—the last staying on 1920 as Envoy till the 1923 emancipation

Great king

1 links

Elevated status among the host of kings and princes.

Elevated status among the host of kings and princes.

The case of maharaja ("great raja", great king and prince, in Sanskrit and Hindi) on the Indian subcontinent, originally reserved for the regional hegemon such as the Gupta, is an example of how such a lofty style can get caught in a cycle of devaluation by "title inflation" as ever more, mostly less powerful rulers adopt the style.

Jai Singh I of Amber receiving Shivaji a day before concluding the Treaty of Purandar (12 June 1665)

Raja

0 links

Royal title used for Indian monarchs.

Royal title used for Indian monarchs.

Jai Singh I of Amber receiving Shivaji a day before concluding the Treaty of Purandar (12 June 1665)
The Maharaja of Benares and his suite, 1870s
Raja Dhruv Dev of Jammu assesses a horse, by Nainsukh, c. 1740s; it was usual for horses to be shown off in front of a white sheet, to better appreciate their form.

While most of the Hindu salute states were ruled by a Maharaja (or variation; some promoted from an earlier Raja- or equivalent style), even exclusively from 13 guns up, a number had Rajas :