Mahatma Gandhi

GandhiMohandas GandhiMohandas Karamchand GandhiMohandas K. GandhiGandhijiGandhianM. K. GandhiM.K. GandhiM.K.GandhiGandhian Movement
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was an Indian lawyer, anti-colonial nationalist, and political ethicist, who employed nonviolent resistance to lead the successful campaign for India's independence from British Rule, and in turn inspire movements for civil rights and freedom across the world.wikipedia
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Indian National Congress

CongressINCIndian National Congress (I)
Assuming leadership of the Indian National Congress in 1921, Gandhi led nationwide campaigns for easing poverty, expanding women's rights, building religious and ethnic amity, ending untouchability, and above all for achieving Swaraj or self-rule.
From the late 19th century, and especially after 1920, under the leadership of Mahatma Gandhi, Congress became the principal leader of the Indian independence movement.

Quit India Movement

Quit IndiaQuit India ResolutionIndian Freedom Movement
Bringing anti-colonial nationalism to the common Indians, Gandhi led them in challenging the British-imposed salt tax with the 400 km Dandi Salt March in 1930, and later in calling for the British to Quit India in 1942.
The Quit India Movement, or the August Movement, was a movement launched at the Bombay session of the All-India Congress Committee by Mahatma Gandhi on 8 August 1942, during World War II, demanding an end to British Rule of India.

List of fasts undertaken by Mahatma Gandhi

undertook long fasts
Thereafter, he lived modestly in a self-sufficient residential community, ate simple vegetarian food, and undertook long fasts as a means of self-purification and political protest.
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, popularly known as Mahatma Gandhi or The Father of the Nation in India, undertook 17 fasts during India's freedom movement.

Salt March

Salt SatyagrahaCivil Disobedience MovementDandi March
Bringing anti-colonial nationalism to the common Indians, Gandhi led them in challenging the British-imposed salt tax with the 400 km Dandi Salt March in 1930, and later in calling for the British to Quit India in 1942.
The Salt March, also known as the Salt Satyagraha, Dandi March and the Dandi Satyagraha, was an act of nonviolent civil disobedience in colonial India led by Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi.

Assassination of Mahatma Gandhi

Narayan Apteassassinationassassinated
Among them was Nathuram Godse, a Hindu nationalist, who assassinated Gandhi on 30 January 1948 by firing three bullets into his chest.
Mahatma Gandhi was assassinated on 30 January 1948 in the compound of Birla House (now Gandhi Smriti), a large mansion in New Delhi.

Nathuram Godse

Nathuram Vinayak GodseGodsea Hindu nationalist
Among them was Nathuram Godse, a Hindu nationalist, who assassinated Gandhi on 30 January 1948 by firing three bullets into his chest.
Nathuram Vinayak Godse (19 May 1910 – 15 November 1949) was the assassin of Mahatma Gandhi, who shot Gandhi in the chest three times at point blank range in New Delhi on 30 January 1948.

Gujarati people

GujaratiGujaratisGujrati
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was born on 2 October 1869 into an Indian Gujarati Hindu Modh Baniya family in Porbandar (also known as Sudamapuri), a coastal town on the Kathiawar Peninsula and then part of the small princely state of Porbandar in the Kathiawar Agency of the Indian Empire.
Gujaratis are prominent in entrepreneurship and business enterprise, and figures such as Mahatma Gandhi, Vallabhbhai Patel played historic roles in the struggle against the British Raj for Indian independence.

Gandhi Jayanti

Gandhi JayanthiMahatma Gandhi's birthday150th birth anniversary
Gandhi's birthday, 2 October, is commemorated in India as Gandhi Jayanti, a national holiday, and worldwide as the International Day of Nonviolence.
Gandhi Jayanti is an event celebrated in India to mark the birth anniversary of Mohandas Gandhi, born 2 October 1869.

Swaraj

self-ruleabsolute Indian self-governanceGram Swaraj
Assuming leadership of the Indian National Congress in 1921, Gandhi led nationwide campaigns for easing poverty, expanding women's rights, building religious and ethnic amity, ending untouchability, and above all for achieving Swaraj or self-rule.
Swarāj (स्वराज swa- "self", raj "rule") can mean generally self-governance or "self-rule", and was used synonymously with "home-rule" by Maharishi Dayanand Saraswati and later on by Mohandas Gandhi, but the word usually refers to Gandhi's concept for Indian independence from foreign domination.

Porbandar

PorbanderPorbunderKadachh
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was born on 2 October 1869 into an Indian Gujarati Hindu Modh Baniya family in Porbandar (also known as Sudamapuri), a coastal town on the Kathiawar Peninsula and then part of the small princely state of Porbandar in the Kathiawar Agency of the Indian Empire.
Porbandar is a city in the Indian state of Gujarat, perhaps best known for being the birthplace of Mahatma Gandhi and Sudama.

Sabarmati Ashram

Gandhi's AshramGandhi AshramHarijan Ashram
Thereafter, he lived modestly in a self-sufficient residential community, ate simple vegetarian food, and undertook long fasts as a means of self-purification and political protest.
This was one of the many residences of Mahatma Gandhi who lived at Sabarmati (Gujarat) and Sevagram (Wardha, Maharashtra) when he was not travelling across India and was not in prison.

Kasturba Gandhi

Kasturbahis wifeKasthoorba Gandhi
In May 1883, the 13-year-old Mohandas was married to 14-year-old Kasturbai Makhanji Kapadia (her first name was usually shortened to "Kasturba", and affectionately to "Ba") in an arranged marriage, according to the custom of the region at that time.
Kasturbai "Kasturba" Mohandas Gandhi ( born Kasturbai Makhanji Kapadia on (11 April 1869 – 22 February 1944) was an Indian political activist, the wife of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi.

International Day of Non-Violence

International Day of Non-Violence Against WomenInternational Day of Nonviolence
Gandhi's birthday, 2 October, is commemorated in India as Gandhi Jayanti, a national holiday, and worldwide as the International Day of Nonviolence.
The International Day of Non-Violence is observed on 2 October, the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi.

Harilal Gandhi

HarilalHarilal Mohandas Gandhi Manu Gandhi
The Gandhi couple had four more children, all sons: Harilal, born in 1888; Manilal, born in 1892; Ramdas, born in 1897; and Devdas, born in 1900.
Harilal Mohandas Gandhi (23 August 1888 – 18 June 1948) was the eldest son of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi and Kasturba Gandhi.

Gujarati language

GujaratiGujratiGujarati-language
Gandhi is also called Bapu (Gujarati: endearment for father, papa ).
Gujarati was the mother tongue of Mahatma Gandhi and Muhammad Ali Jinnah.

Manilal Gandhi

Manilal
The Gandhi couple had four more children, all sons: Harilal, born in 1888; Manilal, born in 1892; Ramdas, born in 1897; and Devdas, born in 1900.
Manilal Mohandas Gandhi (28 October 1892 – 5 April 1956) was the second son of Mohandas Gandhi and Kasturba Gandhi.

Ramdas Gandhi

Ramdas
The Gandhi couple had four more children, all sons: Harilal, born in 1888; Manilal, born in 1892; Ramdas, born in 1897; and Devdas, born in 1900.
Ramdas Mohandas Gandhi (2 January 1897 – 14 April 1969) was the third son of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi.

Devdas Gandhi

DevdasDevadas Gandhi
The Gandhi couple had four more children, all sons: Harilal, born in 1888; Manilal, born in 1892; Ramdas, born in 1897; and Devdas, born in 1900.
Devdas Mohandas Gandhi (22 May 1900 – 3 August 1957) was the fourth and youngest son of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi.

Rajkot

Rajkot, GJRajkot, IndiaRajkot City
In 1874, Gandhi's father Karamchand left Porbandar for the smaller state of Rajkot, where he became a counsellor to its ruler, the Thakur Sahib; though Rajkot was a less prestigious state than Porbandar, the British regional political agency was located there, which gave the state's diwan a measure of security.
Rajkot was home to many personalities like Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi.

Hindu nationalism

Hindu nationalistHindu nationalistsHindu revivalism
Among them was Nathuram Godse, a Hindu nationalist, who assassinated Gandhi on 30 January 1948 by firing three bullets into his chest.
This kind of spiritual Hinduism was later carried forward by Mahatma Gandhi and Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan.

Bhagavad Gita

GitaBhagavad-GitaBhagvad Gita
His mother came from the medieval Krishna bhakti-based Pranami tradition, whose religious texts include the Bhagavad Gita, the Bhagavata Purana, and a collection of 14 texts with teachings that the tradition believes to include the essence of the Vedas, the Quran and the Bible.
The Gitas call for selfless action inspired many leaders of the Indian independence movement including Bal Gangadhar Tilak and Mahatma Gandhi; the latter referred to it as his "spiritual dictionary".

Western India

West IndiaWesternWest
Born and raised in a Hindu family in coastal Gujarat, western India, Gandhi was trained in law at the Inner Temple, London, and called to the bar at age 22 in June 1891.
Gandhi's Dandi March took place in Gujarat.

Henry Stephens Salt

Henry S. SaltHenry SaltHenry
Influenced by Henry Salt's writing, he joined the London Vegetarian Society and was elected to its executive committee under the aegis of its president and benefactor Arnold Hills.
It was Salt who first introduced Mohandas Gandhi to the influential works of Henry David Thoreau, and influenced Gandhi's study of vegetarianism.

Ahmedabad

AhmadabadAhmedabad, IndiaAhemdabad
In November 1887, the 18-year-old Gandhi graduated from high school in Ahmedabad.
The Indian independence movement developed roots in the city when Mahatma Gandhi established two ashrams – the Kochrab Ashram near Paldi in 1915 and the Satyagraha Ashram (now Sabarmati Ashram) on the banks of the Sabarmati in 1917 – which would become centres of nationalist activities.

Spinning wheel

charkhacharkawheel
The same year Gandhi adopted the Indian loincloth, or short dhoti and, in the winter, a shawl, both woven with yarn hand-spun on a traditional Indian spinning wheel, or charkha, as a mark of identification with India's rural poor.
Mahatma Gandhi brought the charkha into wider use with his teachings.