The Edinburgh and London Royal Mail, 1838. The guard can be seen at the back. John Frederick Herring
German post horn (19th century)
North Country Mails at The Peacock, Islington 1821. James Pollard
Post horn
Royal Mail coach preserved in the Science Museum, London
German sign and postbox with post horn logos
A preserved Cobb & Co Australian Royal Mail coach with Concord mud-coach undercarriage
Post horn logo from Sweden
Imported Concord stagecoach 1853, Castlemaine, Victoria, Australia
Muted post horn from The Crying of Lot 49
Postal Horn Emoji from Google Noto, U+1F4EF
alt="Give way to coaches on mountain roads" road sign from Italy (deprecated in 1992)|Old "Stop when encountering coaches on mountain roads" road sign from Italy (removed from the Italian Road Code in 1992)

The instrument was used to signal the arrival or departure of a post rider or mail coach.

- Post horn

The guard was supplied with a timepiece and a posthorn, the former to ensure the schedule was met, the latter to alert the post house to the imminent arrival of the coach and warn tollgate keepers to open the gate (mail coaches were exempt from stopping and paying tolls: a fine was payable if the coach was forced to stop).

- Mail coach
The Edinburgh and London Royal Mail, 1838. The guard can be seen at the back. John Frederick Herring

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