Malagasy language

MalagasyBetsimisarakamlgSakalava MalagasyTandroy-Mahafaly MalagasyAntankarana MalagasyAntemoroBara MalagasyMasikoro MalagasyNorthern Betsimisaraka Malagasy
Malagasy is an Austronesian language and the national language of Madagascar.wikipedia
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Madagascar

MalagasyMadagascanMalagasy politician
Malagasy is an Austronesian language and the national language of Madagascar.
Malagasy and French are both official languages of the state.

Malayo-Polynesian languages

Malayo-PolynesianMalayo-Polynesian languageMalayo-Polynesian language group
The Malagasy language is the westernmost member of the Malayo-Polynesian branch of the Austronesian language family.
Malagasy is spoken in the island of Madagascar located off the eastern coast of Africa in the Indian Ocean.

Austronesian languages

AustronesianAustronesian languageAustronesian language family
Malagasy is an Austronesian language and the national language of Madagascar. The Malagasy language is the westernmost member of the Malayo-Polynesian branch of the Austronesian language family.
Hawaiian, Rapa Nui, Maori and Malagasy (spoken on Madagascar) are the geographic outliers.

Tagalog language

TagalogTagalog-languageFilipino
It is related to other Philippine languages, such as the Bikol languages, Ilocano, the Visayan languages, Kapampangan, and Pangasinan, and more distantly to other Austronesian languages, such as the Formosan languages of Taiwan, Malay (Malaysian and Indonesian), Hawaiian, Māori, and Malagasy.

Austronesian peoples

AustronesianAustronesiansAustronesian people
Madagascar was first settled by Austronesian peoples from Maritime Southeast Asia from Borneo.
The linguistic connections between Madagascar, Polynesia and Southeast Asia were recognized early in the colonial era by European authors, particularly the remarkable similarities between Malagasy, Malay, and Polynesian numerals.

East Barito languages

East Barito
It is related to the Malayo-Polynesian languages of Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines, and specifically to the East Barito languages spoken in Borneo (e.g. Ma'anyan), with apparent influence from early Old Malay.
The East Barito languages are a group of a dozen Dayak (Austronesian) languages of Borneo, and most famously Malagasy, the national language of Madagascar.

Ilocano language

IlocanoIlokanoIloko
An Austronesian language, it is related to such languages as Malay (Indonesian and Malaysian), Tetum, Chamorro, Fijian, Maori, Hawaiian, Samoan, Tahitian, Paiwan and Malagasy.

History of Madagascar

French colony to independenceMadagascarMalagasy
Madagascar was first settled by Austronesian peoples from Maritime Southeast Asia from Borneo. Radama I, the first literate representative of the Merina monarchy, though extensively versed in the Arabico-Malagasy tradition, opted in 1823 for a Latin system derived by David Jones and invited the Protestant London Missionary Society to establish schools and churches.
Centuries of intermarriages created the Malagasy people, who primarily speak Malagasy, an Austronesian language with Bantu, Malay, Arabic, French and English influences.

Hainteny

kabaryohabolanaoratory
Malagasy has a tradition of oratory arts and poetic histories and legends.
Hainteny (pronounced, Malagasy for "knowledge of words") is a traditional form of Malagasy oral literature and poetry, involving heavy use of metaphor.

Coastal Kadazan dialect

KadazanCoastal KadazanKadazan dialect
Another language is Malagasy spoken in the island of Madagascar thousands of miles away off the coast of Africa.

Ma'anyan language

Ma'anyanmhy
It is related to the Malayo-Polynesian languages of Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines, and specifically to the East Barito languages spoken in Borneo (e.g. Ma'anyan), with apparent influence from early Old Malay.
It is closely related to the Malagasy language spoken in Madagascar.

Bushi language

BushiKibushiShibushi
Kibosy (Shibushi or Kibushi) is a dialect of Malagasy spoken in the French-ruled Comorian island of Mayotte.

Malay language

MalayBahasa MelayuMalay-language
Malagasy, a geographic outlier spoken in Madagascar in the Indian Ocean, is also a member of this language family.

Mayotte

Mayotte IslandMahoréMahoran
The second most widely spoken native language is Kibushi, a Malagasy language, of which there are two varieties, Kibushi Kisakalava, most closely related to the Sakalava dialect of Malagasy, and Kibushi Kiantalaotra.

Bantu peoples

BantuBantusBantu people
Far later, c. 1000, the original Austronesian settlers mixed with Bantus and Arabs, amongst others.
the Malagasy people showing Bantu admixture, and their Malagasy language Bantu loans.

Sakalava people

SakalavaSakalava kingdomSakalavas
There are two principal dialects of Malagasy; Eastern (including Merina) and Western (including Sakalava), with the isogloss running down the spine of the island, the south being western, and the central plateau and much of the north (apart from the very tip) being eastern.
The most common explanation is the modern Malagasy translation of Sakalava meaning long ravines, denoting the relatively flat nature of the land in western Madagascar.

Antandroy

Tandroy
While the Tandroy share many common cultural features with other ethnic groups in Madagascar, such as respect for the ancestors, a common language and complex funeral rites, certain practices set them apart.

Malagasy people

MalagasyMadagascarsMalagasay
Most people in Madagascar speak it as a first language as do some people of Malagasy descent elsewhere.

Sorabe alphabet

sorabe
When the French established Fort-Dauphin in the 17th century, they found an Arabico-Malagasy script in use, known as Sorabe ("large writings").
Sorabe, or Sora-be, is an alphabet based on Arabic formerly used to transcribe the Malagasy language (belonging to the Malayo-Polynesian language family) and the Antemoro Malagasy dialect in particular dating from the 15th century.

Mahafaly

Mahafaly people
Mainly involved in farming and cattle raising, they speak a dialect of the Malagasy language, which is a branch of the Malayo-Polynesian language group.

Réunion

La RéunionReunion IslandRéunion Island
It is also spoken by Malagasy communities on neighboring Indian Ocean islands such as Réunion and Comoros.
Because of the diverse population, other languages are also spoken, including Comorian language varieties (especially Shimaore), Malagasy by recent immigrants from Mayotte and Madagascar, Mandarin, Hakka and Cantonese by members of the Chinese community, but fewer people speak these languages as younger generations start to converse in French and Réunion Creole.

Radama I

Radama I of MadagascarRadamaKing Radama
Radama I, the first literate representative of the Merina monarchy, though extensively versed in the Arabico-Malagasy tradition, opted in 1823 for a Latin system derived by David Jones and invited the Protestant London Missionary Society to establish schools and churches.
As a child, Radama was educated at court and learned to read the Malagasy language in the Sorabe Arabico-Malagasy script used by Antemoro ombiasy (court astrologers).

David Jones (missionary)

David Jones
Radama I, the first literate representative of the Merina monarchy, though extensively versed in the Arabico-Malagasy tradition, opted in 1823 for a Latin system derived by David Jones and invited the Protestant London Missionary Society to establish schools and churches.
A gifted linguist, he was noted for establishing the orthography of the Malagasy language and for his translation of the Bible into Malagasy, a work that he undertook with fellow missionary David Griffiths.

Antanosy people

AntanosyTanosy
The Antanosy speak a dialect of the Malagasy language, which is a branch of the Malayo-Polynesian language group derived from the Barito languages, spoken in southern Borneo.

Antaisaka people

AntaisakaAntesakaTesaka
Antesaka speak a dialect of the Malagasy language, which is a branch of the Malayo-Polynesian language group derived from the Barito languages, spoken in southern Borneo.