Malay Peninsula

MalayaThai-Malay PeninsulaMalayan PeninsulaMalay PeninsularMalayMalayanMalaysian PeninsulaMalaysiaTanah MelayuKra Peninsula
The Malay Peninsula (Malay: Semenanjung Tanah Melayu) is a peninsula in Southeast Asia.wikipedia
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Malay language

MalayBahasa MelayuMalay-language
The Malay Peninsula (Malay: Semenanjung Tanah Melayu) is a peninsula in Southeast Asia. In the early 20th century, the term Tanah Melayu was generally used by the Malays of the peninsula during the rise of Malay nationalism to describe uniting all Malay states on the peninsula under one Malay nation, although this ambition was largely realised with the formation of Persekutuan Tanah Melayu (Malay for "Federation of Malaya") in 1948.
A language of the Malays, it is spoken by 290 million people across the Strait of Malacca, including the coasts of the Malay Peninsula of Malaysia and the eastern coast of Sumatra in Indonesia and has been established as a native language of part of western coastal Sarawak and West Kalimantan in Borneo.

Peninsular Malaysia

West MalaysiaMalayaPeninsula Malaysia
The area contains Peninsular Malaysia, Southern Thailand, and the southernmost tip of Myanmar (Kawthaung) as well as the city state Singapore, indigenous to or historically inhabited by the Malays, an Austronesian people. In the early 20th century, the term Tanah Melayu was generally used by the Malays of the peninsula during the rise of Malay nationalism to describe uniting all Malay states on the peninsula under one Malay nation, although this ambition was largely realised with the formation of Persekutuan Tanah Melayu (Malay for "Federation of Malaya") in 1948.
Peninsular Malaysia, also known as Malaya or West Malaysia, is the part of Malaysia which lies on the Malay Peninsula and surrounding islands.

Southern Thailand

Peninsular ThailandSouthernSouth Thailand
The area contains Peninsular Malaysia, Southern Thailand, and the southernmost tip of Myanmar (Kawthaung) as well as the city state Singapore, indigenous to or historically inhabited by the Malays, an Austronesian people.
Southern Thailand is on the Malay Peninsula, with an area of around 70713 km2, bounded to the north by Kra Isthmus, the narrowest part of the peninsula.

Singapore

Republic of SingaporeSingapore CitySingaporean
The area contains Peninsular Malaysia, Southern Thailand, and the southernmost tip of Myanmar (Kawthaung) as well as the city state Singapore, indigenous to or historically inhabited by the Malays, an Austronesian people. The Strait of Malacca separates the Malay Peninsula from the Indonesian island of Sumatra while the south coast is separated from the island of Singapore by the Straits of Johor.
The country is situated one degree (137 km) north of the equator, at the southern tip of the Malay Peninsula, with Indonesia's Riau Islands to the south and Peninsular Malaysia to the north.

Malays (ethnic group)

MalayMalaysMalay people
The area contains Peninsular Malaysia, Southern Thailand, and the southernmost tip of Myanmar (Kawthaung) as well as the city state Singapore, indigenous to or historically inhabited by the Malays, an Austronesian people.
Malays (Orang Melayu, Jawi: أورڠ ملايو) are an Austronesian ethnic group and nation native to the Malay Peninsula, eastern Sumatra of Indonesia and coastal Borneo, as well as the smaller islands which lie between these locations — areas that are collectively known as the Malay world.

Austronesian peoples

AustronesianAustronesiansAustronesian people
The area contains Peninsular Malaysia, Southern Thailand, and the southernmost tip of Myanmar (Kawthaung) as well as the city state Singapore, indigenous to or historically inhabited by the Malays, an Austronesian people.
The Spanish philologist Lorenzo Hervás y Panduro later devoted a large part of his Idea dell' Universo (1778-1787) to the establishment of a language family linking the Malaysian Peninsula, the Maldives, Madagascar, the Sunda Islands, Moluccas, the Philippines, and the Pacific Islands eastward to Easter Island.

Southeast Asia

South East AsiaSouth-East AsiaSoutheast Asian
The Malay Peninsula (Malay: Semenanjung Tanah Melayu) is a peninsula in Southeast Asia.
Its greatest ruler was Hayam Wuruk, whose reign from 1350 to 1389 marked the empire's peak when other kingdoms in the southern Malay Peninsula, Borneo, Sumatra, and Bali came under its influence.

Titiwangsa Mountains

Titiwangsa RangeSankalakhiri RangeSankalakhiri mountain range
The Titiwangsa Mountains are part of the Tenasserim Hills system, and form the backbone of the Peninsula.
The Titiwangsa Range (Malay: Banjaran Titiwangsa; بنجرن تيتيوڠسا), also known as "Banjaran Besar" (Main Range) by locals, is the chain of mountains that forms the backbone of the Malay peninsula.

Tenasserim Hills

Tenasserim RangeTenasserimTenasserim-South Thailand semi-evergreen rain forests
The Titiwangsa Mountains are part of the Tenasserim Hills system, and form the backbone of the Peninsula.
The southern section of this extensive chain of mountains runs along the Kra Isthmus into the Malay peninsula almost reaching Singapore.

Sumatra

SumateraSumatra IslandSumatran
The Strait of Malacca separates the Malay Peninsula from the Indonesian island of Sumatra while the south coast is separated from the island of Singapore by the Straits of Johor.
In the northeast the narrow Strait of Malacca separates the island from the Malay Peninsula, which is an extension of the Eurasian continent.

Kra Isthmus

Isthmus of KraisthmianKra
They form the southernmost section of the central cordillera which runs from Tibet through the Kra Isthmus (the Peninsula's narrowest point) into the Malay Peninsula.
The Kra Isthmus (คอคอดกระ, ; Segenting Kra/Segenting Kera) is the narrowest part of the Malay Peninsula, in southern Thailand.

Malacca Sultanate

Sultanate of MalaccaMalaccaMelaka Sultanate
It is frequently mentioned in the Hikayat Hang Tuah, a well known classic tales associated with the legendary heroes of Malacca Sultanate.
At the height of the sultanate's power in the 15th century, its capital grew into one of the most important entrepôts of its time, with territory covering much of the Malay Peninsula, the Riau Islands and a significant portion of the northern coast of Sumatra in present-day Indonesia.

Straits of Johor

Johore StraitJohor StraitJohore Straits
The Strait of Malacca separates the Malay Peninsula from the Indonesian island of Sumatra while the south coast is separated from the island of Singapore by the Straits of Johor.
The strait separates the Malaysian state of Johor on the mainland Malay Peninsula to the north, from Singapore and its islands on the south.

Manuel Godinho de Erédia

Emanuel Godinho de ErediaEmanuel Godinho de ErédiaGodinho de Erédia
The 17th century's account of Portuguese historian, Emanuel Godinho de Erédia, noted on the region of Malaios surrounded by the Andaman Sea in the north, the entire Malacca Strait in the centre, a part of Sunda Strait in the south, and the western part of South China Sea in the east.
He wrote a number of books, including an early account of the Malay Peninsula that is a source of information on the region of that period.

Strait of Malacca

Straits of MalaccaMalacca StraitMalacca Straits
The Strait of Malacca separates the Malay Peninsula from the Indonesian island of Sumatra while the south coast is separated from the island of Singapore by the Straits of Johor. The 17th century's account of Portuguese historian, Emanuel Godinho de Erédia, noted on the region of Malaios surrounded by the Andaman Sea in the north, the entire Malacca Strait in the centre, a part of Sunda Strait in the south, and the western part of South China Sea in the east.
The Strait of Malacca (Selat Melaka, Selat Malaka, ช่องแคบมะละกา, மலாக்கா நீரிணை, 马六甲海峡) or Straits of Malacca is a narrow, 550 mi stretch of water between the Malay Peninsula (Peninsular Malaysia) and the Indonesian island of Sumatra.

Andaman Sea

AndamanAndaman seacoast
The 17th century's account of Portuguese historian, Emanuel Godinho de Erédia, noted on the region of Malaios surrounded by the Andaman Sea in the north, the entire Malacca Strait in the centre, a part of Sunda Strait in the south, and the western part of South China Sea in the east.
The Andaman Sea (historically also known as the Burma Sea) is a marginal sea of the eastern Indian Ocean separated from the Bay of Bengal (to its west) by the Andaman Islands of India and Myanmar and the Nicobar Islands of India and touching Myanmar, Thailand, and the Malay Peninsula.

South China Sea

East SeaSouth ChinaWest Philippine Sea
The 17th century's account of Portuguese historian, Emanuel Godinho de Erédia, noted on the region of Malaios surrounded by the Andaman Sea in the north, the entire Malacca Strait in the centre, a part of Sunda Strait in the south, and the western part of South China Sea in the east.
On the West. The Mainland, the Southern limit of the Gulf of Thailand and the East coast of the Malay Peninsula.

Portuguese Malacca

MalaccaPortuguese Colonial PeriodPortuguese
In the early 16th century, Tomé Pires, a Portuguese apothecary who stayed in Malaca from 1512 to 1515, writes an almost identical term, Terra de Tana Malaio which he referred to the southeastern part of Sumatra, where the deposed Sultan of Malacca, Mahmud Shah established his exiled government.
He was later remembered as Pangeran Sabrang Lor or the Prince who crossed (the Java Sea) to North (Malay Peninsula).

Golden Chersonese

Chersonesus AureaGolden KhersoneseGolden Peninsula
The Greek source, Geographia, written by Ptolemy, labelled a geographical part of Golden Chersonese as Maleu-kolon, a term thought to derive from Sanskrit malayakolam or malaikurram.
The Golden Chersonese or Golden Khersonese (, Chrysḗ Chersónēsos; Chersonesus Aurea), meaning the Golden Peninsula, was the name used for the Malay Peninsula by Greek and Roman geographers in classical antiquity, most famously in Claudius Ptolemy's 2nd-century Geography.

Melayu Kingdom

MalayuMelayuJambi Kingdom
According to several Indian scholars, the word Malayadvipa ("mountain-insular continent"), mentioned in the ancient Indian text, Vayu Purana, may possibly refer to the Malay peninsula.
An early literary appearance was in Vayu Purana where the word "Malaya Dvipa" (literally "mountainous dvipa") was mentioned, referring to the mountainous terrain of Malay Peninsula.

Early Malay nationalism

Malay nationalismMalay nationalistanti-colonial struggle in the British and Dutch East Indies
In the early 20th century, the term Tanah Melayu was generally used by the Malays of the peninsula during the rise of Malay nationalism to describe uniting all Malay states on the peninsula under one Malay nation, although this ambition was largely realised with the formation of Persekutuan Tanah Melayu (Malay for "Federation of Malaya") in 1948.
Such pre-occupation is a direct response to the European colonial presence and the influx of foreign migrant population in Malaya since the mid-nineteenth century.

Geography (Ptolemy)

GeographyGeographiaPtolemy
The Greek source, Geographia, written by Ptolemy, labelled a geographical part of Golden Chersonese as Maleu-kolon, a term thought to derive from Sanskrit malayakolam or malaikurram.
When it comes to the account of the Golden Chersonese (i.e. Malay Peninsula) and the Magnus Sinus (i.e. Gulf of Thailand and South China Sea), Marinus and Ptolemy relied on the testimony of a Greek sailor named Alexandros, who claimed to have visited a far eastern site called "Cattigara" (most likely Oc Eo, Vietnam, the site of unearthed Antonine-era Roman goods and not far from the region of Jiaozhi in northern Vietnam where ancient Chinese sources claim several Roman embassies first landed in the 2nd and 3rd centuries).

Malaysia

Federation of MalaysiaMalaysianMalaya
"Malayadvipa" was the word used by ancient Indian traders when referring to the Malay Peninsula.

Thailand

ThaiSiamTHA
A further possibility is that Mon-speaking peoples migrating south called themselves syem as do the autochthonous Mon-Khmer-speaking inhabitants of the Malay Peninsula.

Malay Archipelago

MalayaIndonesian ArchipelagoIndo-Australian Archipelago
* Malay Archipelago
The racial concept was proposed by European explorers based on their observations of the influence of the ethnic Malay empire, Srivijaya, which was based on Malay Peninsula, the island of Sumatra, Indonesia.