Maliseet

WolastoqiyikMaleciteMaliseet peopleHoulton Band of Maliseet IndiansMaliseet NationMalécite Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet)EtchiminsHoulton Band of MaliseetsMalecite-Passamaquoddy
The Wəlastəkwewiyik, or Maliseet (, also spelled Malecite), are an Algonquian-speaking First Nation of the Wabanaki Confederacy.wikipedia
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Algonquian languages

AlgonquianAlgonquian languageAlgonquin
The Wəlastəkwewiyik, or Maliseet (, also spelled Malecite), are an Algonquian-speaking First Nation of the Wabanaki Confederacy. Their lands and resources are bounded on the east by the Mi'kmaw people, on the west by the Penobscot people, and on the south by the Passamaquoddy people, who also still speak related Algonquian languages.
The term Algonquin has been suggested to derive from the Maliseet word elakómkwik, "they are our relatives/allies".

Wabanaki Confederacy

WabanakiWabenakiIndigenous peoples
The Wəlastəkwewiyik, or Maliseet (, also spelled Malecite), are an Algonquian-speaking First Nation of the Wabanaki Confederacy.
The Wabanaki Confederacy (Wabenaki, Wobanaki, translated to "People of the Dawn" or "Easterner") are a First Nations and Native American confederation of five principal nations: the Mi'kmaq, Maliseet, Passamaquoddy, Abenaki, and Penobscot.

New Brunswick

NBProvince of New BrunswickNew Brunswick, Canada
They are the Indigenous people of the Saint John River valley and its tributaries, and their territory extends across the current borders of New Brunswick and Quebec in Canada, and parts of Maine in the United States.
Being relatively close to Europe, New Brunswick was among the first places in North America to be explored and settled by Europeans, starting with the French in the early 1600s, who displaced the indigenous Mi'kmaq, Maliseet, and the Passamaquoddy peoples.

First Nations

First NationNorth American IndianIndian
The Wəlastəkwewiyik, or Maliseet (, also spelled Malecite), are an Algonquian-speaking First Nation of the Wabanaki Confederacy. Today, within New Brunswick, there are approximately 7,700 Maliseet with status in the Madawaska, Tobique, Woodstock, Kingsclear, Saint Mary's and Oromocto First Nations.
Along the Atlantic coast were the Beothuk, Maliseet, Innu, Abenaki and Micmac.

Saint John River (Bay of Fundy)

Saint John RiverSt. John RiverSaint John
They are the Indigenous people of the Saint John River valley and its tributaries, and their territory extends across the current borders of New Brunswick and Quebec in Canada, and parts of Maine in the United States.
The Maliseet called it the Wolastoq, meaning bountiful and good and seek to restore this name.

Maine

MEState of MaineMaine, United States
They are the Indigenous people of the Saint John River valley and its tributaries, and their territory extends across the current borders of New Brunswick and Quebec in Canada, and parts of Maine in the United States.
The original inhabitants of the territory that is now Maine were Algonquian-speaking Wabanaki peoples, including the Passamaquoddy, Maliseet, Penobscot, Androscoggin and Kennebec.

Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians

Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians of MaineHoulton Band of MaliseetsHoulton Band of Maliseet Indians Reservation
The Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians, based on the Meduxnekeag River in the Maine portion of their traditional homeland, are since 19 July 1776, the first "foreign" Treaty allies with the United States of America and a federally recognized tribe of Maliseet people by the United States.
The Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians of Maine is a federally recognized tribe of Maliseet, whose land is along the Meduxnekeag River in Maine.

Penobscot

Penobscot NationPenobscot peoplePenobscot Indian Nation
Their lands and resources are bounded on the east by the Mi'kmaw people, on the west by the Penobscot people, and on the south by the Passamaquoddy people, who also still speak related Algonquian languages.
They are part of the Wabanaki Confederacy, along with the Abenaki, Passamaquoddy, Maliseet, and Mi'kmaq nations, all of whom historically spoke Algonquian languages.

Meductic Indian Village / Fort Meductic

MeducticMedoctecFort Meductic
Later in the century, sources indicate their headquarters had shifted upriver to Meductic, on the middle reaches of the Saint John River.
Meductic Indian Village / Fort Meductic (also known as Medoctec, Mehtawtik meaning "the end of the path") was a Maliseet settlement until the mid-eighteenth century.

Miꞌkmaq

Mi'kmaqMicmacMi'kmaq people
Their lands and resources are bounded on the east by the Mi'kmaw people, on the west by the Penobscot people, and on the south by the Passamaquoddy people, who also still speak related Algonquian languages.
In the wake of King Phillips War between English colonists and Native Americans in southern New England (which included the first military conflict between the Miꞌkmaq and New England), the Miꞌkmaq became members of the Wapnáki (Wabanaki Confederacy), an alliance with four other Algonquian-language nations: the Abenaki, Penobscot, Passamaquoddy, and Maliseet.

Malecite-Passamaquoddy language

Malecite-PassamaquoddyMaliseetMalecite
The customs and language of the Maliseet are very similar to those of the neighbouring Passamaquoddy (Peskotomuhkati).
Malecite–Passamaquoddy (also known as Maliseet–Passamaquoddy) is an endangered Algonquian language spoken by the Maliseet and Passamaquoddy peoples along both sides of the border between Maine in the United States and New Brunswick, Canada.

Innu

MontagnaisInnu peopleInnu Nation
Local histories depict many encounters with the Iroquois, five powerful nations based south and east of the Great Lakes, and the Innu.
The Innu were historically allied with neighbouring Atikamekw, Maliseet and Algonquin against their enemies, the Algonquian-speaking Mi'kmaq and Iroquois nations.

Madawaska Maliseet First Nation

MadawaskaSt. Basile 10
Today, within New Brunswick, there are approximately 7,700 Maliseet with status in the Madawaska, Tobique, Woodstock, Kingsclear, Saint Mary's and Oromocto First Nations.
Madawaska Maliseet First Nation or St. Basile 10 band is one of six Wolastoqiyik or Maliseet Nations on the Saint John River in Canada.

Tobique First Nation

TobiqueTobique First Nations ReserveTobique 20
Today, within New Brunswick, there are approximately 7,700 Maliseet with status in the Madawaska, Tobique, Woodstock, Kingsclear, Saint Mary's and Oromocto First Nations.
Tobique First Nation is one of six Wolastoqiyik or Maliseet Nation reserves in New Brunswick, Canada.

Marc Lescarbot

Lescarbot
Written accounts in the early 17th century, such as those of Samuel de Champlain and Marc LesCarbot, refer to a large Malécite village at the mouth of the Saint John River.
The following spring they made a trip to the Saint John River and Île Sainte-Croix, where they encountered the Algonquian-speaking indigenous peoples called the Mi'kmaq and the Malécite.

Woodstock First Nation

Woodstock
Today, within New Brunswick, there are approximately 7,700 Maliseet with status in the Madawaska, Tobique, Woodstock, Kingsclear, Saint Mary's and Oromocto First Nations.
The Woodstock First Nation are a Maliseet First Nation of the Canadian Province of New Brunswick.

St. Mary's First Nation

Devon 30St. Mary's 24St. Mary's, New Brunswick
Today, within New Brunswick, there are approximately 7,700 Maliseet with status in the Madawaska, Tobique, Woodstock, Kingsclear, Saint Mary's and Oromocto First Nations.
St. Mary's Band or St. Mary's First Nation is one of six Wolastoqiyik or Maliseet Nations on the Saint John River in Canada.

Jeremy Dutcher

Many of these songs were lost to the community, as the pressures to assimilate into mainstream Canadian culture led the Maliseet people to stop passing their songs on to youth; in the 2010s, however, Maliseet musician Jeremy Dutcher undertook a project of listening to the wax cylinder recordings and reviving the songs.
A Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet) member of the Tobique First Nation in North-West New Brunswick, Dutcher studied music and anthropology at Dalhousie University.

Wolastoqiyik Lintuwakonawa

His album Wolastoqiyik Lintuwakonawa was released in 2018, and won the 2018 Polaris Music Prize.
Guided by the suggestion on a Wolastoqiyik elder, teacher, and song carrier named Maggie Paul he began to study traditional songs which eventually led the classically-trained opera singer to start a research project at the Canadian Museum of History. There he explored an extensive collection of documents, photographs and recordings made by anthropologist William Mechling between 1907 and 1914 when he spent time in indigenous communities documenting the languages and cultures under the assumption they were soon to disappear.

Gabriel Acquin

He was a Maliseet hunter, guide, interpreter and showman who was the founder of the St. Mary's First Nation reserve in Canada.

Passamaquoddy

Passamaquoddy peoplePassamaquoddy TribePassamaquoddy Tribe of Maine
Their lands and resources are bounded on the east by the Mi'kmaw people, on the west by the Penobscot people, and on the south by the Passamaquoddy people, who also still speak related Algonquian languages. The customs and language of the Maliseet are very similar to those of the neighbouring Passamaquoddy (Peskotomuhkati).
About 500 people, most if not all over the age of 50, speak the Malecite-Passamaquoddy language, shared (other than minor differences in dialect) with the neighboring and related Maliseet people.

Sandra Lovelace Nicholas

Sandra LovelaceS.M. Lovelace-Nicholas
Mary Sandra Lovelace Nicholas, CM (born April 15, 1948) is a Wolastoqiyik or Maliseet Canadian senator representing New Brunswick.

Philip LeSourd

The linguist Philip LeSourd has done extensive research on the language.
He is one of the world's foremost experts on the Maliseet-Passamaquoddy language and the Algonquian language family.

Henry John Bear

Henry Bear
Henry John Bear a treaty rights educator, tribal lawyer, fisherman and forester, was elected by his people to this seat.
In January 2013, he was sworn-in as the first elected member of the Maine House of Representatives representing the Maliseet people.