Manchester school (anthropology)

Manchester SchoolManchester Group
The Department of Social Anthropology at the University of Manchester, founded by Max Gluckman in 1947 became known among anthropologists and other social scientists as the Manchester School.wikipedia
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Max Gluckman

(Herman) Max GluckmanF. M. GluckmanGluckman
The Department of Social Anthropology at the University of Manchester, founded by Max Gluckman in 1947 became known among anthropologists and other social scientists as the Manchester School.
He is best known as the founder of the Manchester School of anthropology.

Social network

networknetworkingnetworks
Manchester school members and interlocutors also played major roles in the development of the field of Social Networks in anthropology and the social sciences.
A group of social anthropologists associated with Max Gluckman and the Manchester School, including John A. Barnes, J. Clyde Mitchell and Elizabeth Bott Spillius, often are credited with performing some of the first fieldwork from which network analyses were performed, investigating community networks in southern Africa, India and the United Kingdom.

Social anthropology

social anthropologistsocialsocial anthropologists
The Department of Social Anthropology at the University of Manchester, founded by Max Gluckman in 1947 became known among anthropologists and other social scientists as the Manchester School.
Following World War II, sociocultural anthropology as comprised by the fields of ethnography and ethnology diverged into an American school of cultural anthropology while social anthropology diversified in Europe by challenging the principles of structure-functionalism, absorbing ideas from Claude Lévi-Strauss's structuralism and from Max Gluckman’s Manchester school, and embracing the study of conflict, change, urban anthropology, and networks.

Elizabeth Spillius

Elizabeth BottElizabeth Bott Spillius
John Barnes, Elizabeth Bott, and J. Clyde Mitchell were all associated with Gluckman's department.
Often regarded as a member of the Manchester Group of anthropologists, her best-known work was Family and Social Network (1957), based on her 1956 PhD with working-class families in East London, in which she formulated what was subsequently labelled the Bott Hypothesis: that the density of a husband and wife's separate social networks was positively associated with marital role segregation.

J. Clyde Mitchell

Clyde MitchellJ. C. MitchellJames Clyde Mitchell
John Barnes, Elizabeth Bott, and J. Clyde Mitchell were all associated with Gluckman's department.
He was influenced by Max Gluckman and conducted important research on social network analysis at the University of Manchester (see Manchester School).

F. G. Bailey

F.G. Bailey
He received his Ph.D. in social anthropology from Manchester University, working under Max Gluckman, and is closely associated with the Manchester School of social anthropology.

Bill Epstein

A. L. EpsteinA.L. Epstein
A member of the "Manchester School", he was known for his research on ethnicity and identity, particularly his book Ethos and Identity (1978), and for his ethnographic work in Central Africa and New Britain.

John Arundel Barnes

J. A. BarnesJohn BarnesJohn A. Barnes
John Barnes, Elizabeth Bott, and J. Clyde Mitchell were all associated with Gluckman's department.
Barnes was a student of Max Gluckman in the Manchester School.

T. Scarlett Epstein

There she completed a PhD in economics under the supervision of social anthropologist Max Gluckman, the founder of the "Manchester School".

Ronald Frankenberg

He was a student of Max Gluckman and a member of the Manchester School of British Social Anthropology.

Norman Long

He joined Max Gluckman's 'Manchester School' of anthropology at the University of Manchester and completed a PhD in Social Anthropology, based on research in Zambia, in 1967.

E. Adamson Hoebel

Hoebel
He was a close friend and colleague of Max Gluckman, founder of the Manchester School of British Social Anthropology.

University of Manchester

Manchester UniversityManchesterThe University of Manchester
The Department of Social Anthropology at the University of Manchester, founded by Max Gluckman in 1947 became known among anthropologists and other social scientists as the Manchester School.

Class conflict

class struggleclass warfareclass war
The Manchester School also read the works of Marx and other economists and sociologists and looked at issues of social justice such as apartheid and class conflict.

Rhodes-Livingstone Institute

Several anthropologists who were not directly associated with the Manchester University anthropology department are sometimes considered members of the Manchester School, particularly those who were associated with Gluckman or his students through the Rhodes-Livingstone Institute.

Edmund Leach

E. R. LeachEdmund Ronald LeachSir Edmund Ronald Leach
Some others, such as Edmund Leach, at one period or another were significant interlocutors of the Manchester School.

University of Cambridge

Cambridge UniversityCambridgeUniversity
An alternative adjectival form for the Manchester School is "Mancunian" (like Cantabrigian for Cambridge University).