Manchu Restoration

Restored Qing Governmentabortive attemptabortive restorationattemptattempt to forcibly restoreattempt to restore the Qing dynastyattempted to restorebriefly regained powerbriefly restoredcoup
The Manchu Restoration of July 1917 was an attempt to restore monarchy in China by General Zhang Xun, whose army seized Beijing and briefly reinstalled the last emperor of the Qing dynasty, Puyi, to the throne.wikipedia
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Puyi

Xuantong EmperorPu YiEmperor Puyi
The Manchu Restoration of July 1917 was an attempt to restore monarchy in China by General Zhang Xun, whose army seized Beijing and briefly reinstalled the last emperor of the Qing dynasty, Puyi, to the throne.
He was briefly restored to the throne as emperor by the warlord Zhang Xun from 1 July to 12 July 1917.

Zhang Xun

Zhang Xun (Qing loyalist)
The Manchu Restoration of July 1917 was an attempt to restore monarchy in China by General Zhang Xun, whose army seized Beijing and briefly reinstalled the last emperor of the Qing dynasty, Puyi, to the throne.
Zhang Xun (September 16, 1854 – September 11, 1923), courtesy name Shaoxuan, was a Qing loyalist general who attempted to restore the abdicated emperor Puyi in the Manchu Restoration of 1917.

Qing dynasty

QingQing EmpireChina
The Manchu Restoration of July 1917 was an attempt to restore monarchy in China by General Zhang Xun, whose army seized Beijing and briefly reinstalled the last emperor of the Qing dynasty, Puyi, to the throne.
In July 1917, there was an abortive attempt to restore the Qing dynasty led by Zhang Xun, which was quickly reversed by republican troops.

Emperor of China

emperoremperors of ChinaChinese emperor
On the morning of July 1, 1917, the royalist general Zhang Xun took advantage of the unrest and entered the capital, proclaiming the restoration of Puyi as Emperor of China at 4 am with a small entourage and reviving the Qing monarchy which had been abolished earlier on February 12, 1912.
He was briefly restored for almost two weeks during a coup in 1917 but was overthrown again shortly after.

Li Yuanhong

Li Yuan-hungLi Yuanhung
The confrontation between President Li Yuanhong and Premier Duan Qirui about whether to join the Allied Powers in World War I and declare war on Germany led to political unrest in the capital Beijing in the spring of 1917.
Zhang then proceeded with a move that would undermine most of his support when he attempted to restore Emperor Puyi and the Qing dynasty on 1 July.

Royalist Party

As result, pro-Qing restorationist groups, most notably the Royalist Party, remained a underrepresented, but powerful factor in Chinese politics during the 1910s.
Over time, the Royalist Party was mostly reduced in its activities to Northeast China, and very few of its members (among them Puwei and Shen Zengjié) were involved in Zhang Xun's attempt to forcibly restore the Qing dynasty in 1917.

Zhu Jiabao

He was also supported by several other officials, including Beiyang General Jiang Chaozong, former Qing war minister Wang Shizhen, civil affairs minister Zhu Jiabao, and diplomat Xie Jieshi.
Zhu Jiabao (1860 – September 5, 1923) was a Chinese monarchist politician who supported the creation of the Empire of China and the 1917 Manchu Restoration of Zhang Xun.

Anhui clique

Anfu ClubAnfu cliqueAnhui
The withdrawal of Li led to the strengthening of military cliques in northern China and left the already-fractured central government in the hands of the Feng Zhili-Anhui clique dominated by Duan.
With Japanese support and the suppression of the Manchu Restoration, it became the most powerful faction in China from 1916 to 1920.

Republic of China (1912–1949)

Republic of ChinaChinaChinese
After Yuan's death in 1916, the authority of the Beiyang government was further weakened by a brief restoration of the Qing dynasty.

List of emperors of the Qing dynasty

Emperor of the Qing dynastyEmperorEmperor of China
On the morning of July 1, 1917, the royalist general Zhang Xun took advantage of the unrest and entered the capital, proclaiming the restoration of Puyi as Emperor of China at 4 am with a small entourage and reviving the Qing monarchy which had been abolished earlier on February 12, 1912.

Song Zheyuan

Sung Che-yuan
In 1917, a year after being appointed the head of 1st battalion of Feng's 2nd regiment, his battalion spearheaded the removal of Zhang Xun from his imperial restoration in 1917.

Warlord Era

warlordswarlordwarlordism
As Zhang marched into Beijing on 1 July, he quickly dissolved the parliament and proclaimed a Manchu Restoration.

Beijing

Beijing, ChinaPekingPeking, China
The Manchu Restoration of July 1917 was an attempt to restore monarchy in China by General Zhang Xun, whose army seized Beijing and briefly reinstalled the last emperor of the Qing dynasty, Puyi, to the throne.

Han Chinese

HanChineseHan people
Despite the uprising's popular name ("Manchu Restoration"), almost all reactionary putschists were ethnic Han Chinese.

Northeast China

NortheastNortheastern Chinanortheastern
The Qing also enjoyed support among sections of the Han Chinese population as well, such as in Northeastern China.

Premier of the Republic of China

PremierPresident of the Executive Yuan of TaiwanPresident of the Executive Yuan
The confrontation between President Li Yuanhong and Premier Duan Qirui about whether to join the Allied Powers in World War I and declare war on Germany led to political unrest in the capital Beijing in the spring of 1917.

Duan Qirui

The confrontation between President Li Yuanhong and Premier Duan Qirui about whether to join the Allied Powers in World War I and declare war on Germany led to political unrest in the capital Beijing in the spring of 1917.

Allies of World War I

AlliesAlliedAllied Powers
The confrontation between President Li Yuanhong and Premier Duan Qirui about whether to join the Allied Powers in World War I and declare war on Germany led to political unrest in the capital Beijing in the spring of 1917.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarWorld War One
The confrontation between President Li Yuanhong and Premier Duan Qirui about whether to join the Allied Powers in World War I and declare war on Germany led to political unrest in the capital Beijing in the spring of 1917.

Jiang Chaozong

He was also supported by several other officials, including Beiyang General Jiang Chaozong, former Qing war minister Wang Shizhen, civil affairs minister Zhu Jiabao, and diplomat Xie Jieshi.

Wang Shizhen (Beiyang government)

Wang Shizhen
He was also supported by several other officials, including Beiyang General Jiang Chaozong, former Qing war minister Wang Shizhen, civil affairs minister Zhu Jiabao, and diplomat Xie Jieshi.

Xie Jieshi

Xie Jishi
He was also supported by several other officials, including Beiyang General Jiang Chaozong, former Qing war minister Wang Shizhen, civil affairs minister Zhu Jiabao, and diplomat Xie Jieshi.

Feng Guozhang

Feng Kuo-chang
Before taking refuge in the Japanese embassy, Li had taken certain measures, including leaving the presidential seal in the Presidential Palace, appointing Vice President Feng Guozhang as Acting President, and restoring Duan Qirui as Premier, in an attempt to enlist them in the defense of the republic.

Zhili clique

ZhiliZhili warlord factionZhili Army (Zhili clique)
The withdrawal of Li led to the strengthening of military cliques in northern China and left the already-fractured central government in the hands of the Feng Zhili-Anhui clique dominated by Duan.

Constitutional Protection Junta

government movementGuangzhou Military Governmentmilitary government in Guangzhou
The weakening of the central government led to the further fragmentation of China into the warlord era and the rival government of Sun Yat-sen gaining popularity and traction in the south.