A report on Manchu peopleQing dynasty and Xinjiang

Aguda, Emperor Taizu of Jurchen Jin
An imperial portrait of Nurgaci
The Qing dynasty in 1890. Territory under its control shown in dark green; territory claimed but uncontrolled shown in light green.
Dzungaria (Red) and the Tarim Basin or Altishahr (Blue)
The Qing Empire ca. 1820
The Qing dynasty in 1890. Territory under its control shown in dark green; territory claimed but uncontrolled shown in light green.
Northern Xinjiang (Junggar Basin) (Yellow), Eastern Xinjiang- Turpan Depression (Turpan Prefecture and Hami Prefecture) (Red) and Altishahr/the Tarim Basin (Blue)
Prince Zaitao dresses in modern reformed uniform of late Qing dynasty
Italian 1682 map showing the "Kingdom of the Nüzhen" or the "Jin Tartars"
Physical map showing the separation of Dzungaria and the Tarim Basin (Altishahr) by the Tien Shan Mountains
Noblewoman Wanyan Litongji, 1900s
Manchu cavalry charging Ming infantry battle of Sarhu in 1619
Map of Han Dynasty in 2 CE. Light blue is the Tarim Basin protectorate.
"Banjin Inenggi" and Manchu linguistic activity by the government and students in Changchun, 2011
Sura han ni chiha (Coins of Tiancong Khan) in Manchu alphabet
Old Uyghur/Yugur art from the Bezeklik murals
the cover of the Eight Manchu Banners' Surname-Clans' Book
Dorgon (1612–1650)
The Tarim Basin in the 3rd century AD
A musketeer wearing a queue and formal hat
Qing Empire in 1636
A Sogdian man on a Bactrian camel. Sancai ceramic statuette, Tang dynasty
Han and Manchu clothing coexisted during Qing dynasty
The Qing conquest of the Ming and expansion of the empire
Mongol states from the 14th to the 17th centuries: the Northern Yuan dynasty, Four Oirat, Moghulistan and Kara Del
Han Chinese clothing in early Qing
The Kangxi Emperor (r. 1662–1722)
The Dzungar–Qing Wars, between the Qing Dynasty and the Dzungar Khanate
Han Chinese general Zhang Zhiyuan wearing Qing military outfit.
Emperor with Manchu army in Khalkha 1688
The Battle of Oroi-Jalatu in 1756, between the Manchu and Oirat armies
Painting of the Qianlong Emperor hunting
Putuo Zongcheng Temple, Chengde, Qianlong reign; built on the model of Potala Palace, Lhasa
The Qing Empire ca. 1820
Manchu wrestlers competed in front of the Qianlong Emperor
Campaign against the Dzungars in the Qing conquest of Xinjiang 1755–1758
Scene from the 1828 Qing campaign against rebels in Altishahr
The performance of Manchu palace skaters on holiday
Lord Macartney saluting the Qianlong Emperor
Yakub Beg, ruler of Yettishar
Octagonal drum performance on stage
Commerce on the water, Prosperous Suzhou by Xu Yang, 1759
19th-century Khotan Uyghurs in Yettishar
Akšan, Manchu singer and ulabun artist
British Steamship destroying Chinese war junks (E. Duncan) (1843)
Kuomintang in Xinjiang, 1942
Manchu autonomous area in Liaoning.{{#tag:ref|Autonomous counties are shown in bright green. Counties with autonomous townships are in dark green, with the number of Manchu townshipin each county shown in red (or yellow). So are another 2 pictures|group=note}}
View of the Canton River, showing the Thirteen Factories in the background, 1850–1855
Governor Sheng Shicai ruled from 1933 to 1944.
Manchu autonomous area in Jilin.
Government forces defeating Taiping armies
The Soviet-backed Second East Turkestan Republic encompassed Xinjiang's Ili, Tarbagatay and Altay districts.
Manchu autonomous area in Hebei.
Yixin, Prince Gong
Close to Karakoram Highway in Xinjiang.
Manchu Hunting party
Empress Dowager Cixi (Oil painting by Hubert Vos c. 1905))
Pamir Mountains and Muztagh Ata.
Manchu Hunting party
Britain, Germany, Russia, France, and Japan dividing China
Taklamakan Desert
Manchu Hunting party
Foreign armies in the Forbidden City 1900
Tianchi Lake
Manchu Hunting party
Yuan Shikai
Black Irtysh river in Burqin County is a famous spot for sightseeing.
Manchu Hunting party
Qing China in 1911
Kanas Lake
Manchu Hunting party
Zaifeng, Prince Chun
Largest cities and towns of Xinjiang
Manchu Hunting party
A pitched battle between the imperial and revolutionary armies in 1911
Statue of Mao Zedong in Kashgar
Manchu Hunting party
A postage stamp from Yantai (Chefoo) in the Qing dynasty
Nur Bekri, Chairman of the Xinjiang Government between 2007 and 2015
Manchu Hunting party
A Qing dynasty mandarin
The distribution map of Xinjiang's GDP per person (2011)
Manchu Hunting party
The emperor of China from The Universal Traveller
Ürümqi is a major industrial center within Xinjiang.
Manchu Hunting party
2000–cash Da-Qing Baochao banknote from 1859
Wind farm in Xinjiang
Manchu Hunting party
The Eighteen Provinces of China proper in 1875
Sunday market in Khotan
Qing China in 1832
Ürümqi Diwopu International Airport
The Qing dynasty in ca. 1820, with provinces in yellow, military governorates and protectorates in light yellow, tributary states in orange
Karakorum highway
Brush container symbol of elegant gentry culture
This flag (Kök Bayraq) has become a symbol of the East Turkestan independence movement.
Chen Clan Ancestral Hall (陈家祠) built in 1894
"Heroic Gesture of Bodhisattvathe Bodhisattva", example of 6th-7th-century terracotta Greco-Buddhist art (local populations were Buddhist) from Tumxuk, Xinjiang
Patriarchal family
Sogdian donors to the Buddha, 8th century fresco (with detail), Bezeklik, Eastern Tarim Basin
Placard (right to left) in Manchu, Chinese, Tibetan, Mongolian Yonghe Lamasery, Beijing
A mosque in Ürümqi
Silver coin: 1 yuan/dollar Xuantong 3rd year - 1911 Chopmark
People engaging in snow sports by a statue of bodhisattva Guanyin in Wujiaqu
Xián Fēng Tōng Bǎo (咸豐通寶) 1850–1861 Qing dynasty copper (brass) cash coin
Christian Church in Hami
Puankhequa (1714–1788). Chinese merchant and member of a Cohong family.
Catholic Church in Urumqi
Pine, Plum and Cranes, 1759, by Shen Quan (1682–1760).
Temple of the Great Buddha in Midong, Ürümqi
A Daoguang period Peking glass vase. Colored in "Imperial Yellow", due to its association with the Qing.
Taoist Temple of Fortune and Longevity at the Heavenly Lake of Tianshan in Fukang, Changji Hui Autonomous Prefecture
Jade book of the Qianlong period on display at the British Museum
Emin Minaret
Landscape by Wang Gai, 1694
Id Kah mosque in Kashgar, largest mosque in China
The Eighteen Provinces of China proper in 1875
Erkin Tuniyaz, the incumbent Chairman of the Xinjiang Government

The Qing dynasty, officially the Great Qing, was a Manchu-led conquest dynasty and the last imperial dynasty of China.

- Qing dynasty

The Later Jin (1616–1636) and Qing (1636–1912) dynasties of China were established and ruled by the Manchus, who are descended from the Jurchen people who earlier established the Jin dynasty (1115–1234) in northern China.

- Manchu people

The territory came under the rule of the Qing dynasty in the 18th century, later replaced by the Republic of China government.

- Xinjiang

Both regions merged after Qing dynasty suppressed the Revolt of the Altishahr Khojas in 1759 and became the region of "Xiyu Xinjiang", later simplified as "Xinjiang" / "Sinkiang" (, Manchu: ᡳᠴᡝ

- Xinjiang

A few of them were sent to other places such as Inner Mongolia, Xinjiang and Tibet to serve as garrison troops.

- Manchu people

Qianlong personally led the Ten Great Campaigns to expand military control into present-day Xinjiang and Mongolia, putting down revolts and uprisings in Sichuan and parts of southern China while expanding control over Tibet.

- Qing dynasty
Aguda, Emperor Taizu of Jurchen Jin

3 related topics with Alpha

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Image of a Mongolian lady (incorrectly identified as Genepil, Queen consort of Mongolia )

Mongols

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East Asian ethnic group native to Mongolia, Inner Mongolia in China and the Buryatia Republic of the Russian Federation.

East Asian ethnic group native to Mongolia, Inner Mongolia in China and the Buryatia Republic of the Russian Federation.

Image of a Mongolian lady (incorrectly identified as Genepil, Queen consort of Mongolia )
Asia in 500, showing the Rouran Khaganate and its neighbors, including the Northern Wei and the Tuyuhun Khanate, all of them were established by Proto-Mongols
Mongol man with a hat, Yuan dynasty
Mongol wearing a hat, 14th c.
Yuan dynasty Mongol rider
A portrait of Kublai Khan by Araniko (1245–1306)
Mongol huntsmen, Ming dynasty
The Northern Yuan dynasty and Turco-Mongol residual states and domains by the 15th century
Map showing wars between Qing Dynasty and Dzungar Khanate
A Dzungar soldier called Ayusi from the high Qing era, by Giuseppe Castiglione, 1755
The Battle of Oroi-Jalatu in 1755 between the Qing (that ruled China at the time) and Mongol Dzungar armies. The fall of the Dzungar Khanate
Khorloogiin Choibalsan, leader of the Mongolian People's Republic (left), and Georgy Zhukov consult during the Battle of Khalkhin Gol against Japanese troops, 1939
World War II Zaisan Memorial, Ulaan Baatar, from the People's Republic of Mongolia era.
Mongolian President Tsakhiagiin Elbegdorj (right)
A Mongolic Ger
Chronological tree of the Mongolic languages
Buddhist temple in Buryatia, Russia
Timur of Mongolic origin himself had converted almost all the Borjigin leaders to Islam.
Mongols grazing livestock, by Roy Chapman Andrews photographs in 1921
Mural of a Mongol family, Yuan dynasty
The Mughal Emperor Babur and his heir Humayun. The word Mughal is derived from the Persian word for Mongol.
This map shows the boundary of the 13th-century Mongol Empire and location of today's Mongols in modern Mongolia, Russia and China.
Mongol women in traditional dress
Strong Mongol men at August games. Photo by Wm. Purdom, 1909
Mongol Empress Zayaat (Jiyatu), wife of Kulug Khan (1281–1311)
Genghis' son Tolui with Queen Sorgaqtani
Hulegu Khan, ruler of the Ilkhanate
13th century Ilkhanid Mongol archer
Mongol soldiers by Rashid al-Din, BnF. MS. Supplément Persan 1113. 1430-1434 AD.
Kalmyk Mongol girl Annushka (painted in 1767)
A 20th-century Mongol Khan, Navaanneren
The 4th Dalai Lama Yonten Gyatso
Dolgorsürengiin Dagvadorj became the first Mongol to reach sumo's highest rank.
Mongol women archers during Naadam festival
A Mongol musician
A Mongol Wrangler
Buryat Mongol shaman
Kalmyks, 19th century
Mongol girl performing Bayad dance
Buryat Mongols (painted in 1840)
Daur Mongol Empress Wanrong (1906–1946), also had Borjigin blood on maternal side.
Buryat Mongol boy during shamanic rite
Concubine Wenxiu was Puyi's consort
A Mongolian Buddhist monk, 1913

He got into conflicts with the Manchus over the looting of Chinese cities, and managed to alienate most Mongol tribes.

By 1636, most Inner Mongolian nobles had submitted to the Qing dynasty founded by the Manchus.

With the independence of Outer Mongolia, the Mongolian army controlled Khalkha and Khovd regions (modern day Uvs, Khovd, and Bayan-Ölgii provinces), but Northern Xinjiang (the Altai and Ili regions of the Qing Empire), Upper Mongolia, Barga and Inner Mongolia came under control of the newly formed Republic of China.

Map with historic extent of Manchuria. Inner Manchuria lies in Northeast China, coloured in red. Outer Manchuria to the north and the part today in Inner Mongolia to the west are in lighter red.

Manchuria

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Deprecated in the People's Republic China after 1949 due to its association with Manchurian nationalism and the breakaway of Manchukuo.

Deprecated in the People's Republic China after 1949 due to its association with Manchurian nationalism and the breakaway of Manchukuo.

Map with historic extent of Manchuria. Inner Manchuria lies in Northeast China, coloured in red. Outer Manchuria to the north and the part today in Inner Mongolia to the west are in lighter red.
One of the earliest European maps using the term "Manchuria" (Mandchouria) (John Tallis, 1851). Previously, the term "Chinese Tartary" had been commonly applied in the West to Manchuria and Mongolia
1900s map of Manchuria, in pink
Climate map of Manchuria or Northeast China.
Hailang River near Hailin City in Heilongjiang
A 12th-century Jurchen stone tortoise in today's Ussuriysk
The Three Kingdoms of Korea occupied roughly half of Manchuria, 5th century AD
The Mongol Yuan province of Liaoyang included northern Korea
Manchuria is the homeland of the Jurchens who became the Manchus.
A Jurchen man hunting from his horse, from a 15th-century ink-and-color painting on silk
The Manchu-led Qing dynasty circa 1820. Later Jin area in purple line
Map showing the original border (in pink) between Manchuria and Russia according to the Treaty of Nerchinsk 1689, and subsequent losses of territory to Russia in the treaties of Aigun 1858 (beige) and Peking 1860 (red)
Harbin's Kitayskaya Street (Russian for "Chinese Street"), now Zhongyang Street (Chinese for "Central Street"), before 1945
1940 Manchukuo visa issued at Hamburg
Map of Manchukuo (1933–1945)
Map of the three provinces of Northeast China (1911) {{sfnp|EB|1911}}
Map of Manchukuo and its rail network, c.{{nbsp}}1945
Map with the historic extent of Manchuria. Inner Manchuria lies in Northeast China, colored in red. Outer Manchuria to the north and the part today in Inner Mongolia to the west are in lighter red.

Northeast China is predominantly Han Chinese due to internal Chinese migrations and Sinicization of the Manchus especially during the Qing Dynasty.

Greater Manchuria, the region of Northeast Asia that served as the historical homeland of the Jurchens and later their descendants Manchus, which was controlled in whole by China before the Amur Annexation in 1860. The region was since then divided between China (Northeast China, also known as "Inner Manchuria") and Russia (the Amur drainage basin that is located south of the Uda River and Stanovoy Range, which is now comprised the southern part of the Russian Far East. Also known as "Russian Manchuria", "Outer Northeast" or "Outer Manchuria");

At the behest of people like Vasilii Poyarkov in 1645 and Yerofei Khabarov in 1650, Russian Cossacks killed some peoples like the Daur people of Inner Mongolia and Xinjiang to the extent that some authors speak of genocide.

The eight main dialect areas of Mandarin in Mainland China

Han Chinese

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East Asian ethnic group and nation native to China.

East Asian ethnic group and nation native to China.

The eight main dialect areas of Mandarin in Mainland China
The main varieties of Chinese in mainland China and Taiwan
Lungshan Temple of Manka in Taipei
A female servant and male advisor dressed in silk robes, ceramic figurines from the Western Han era
Map of Tang China in 742, showing the major provinces of the empire
Han Chinese man wears a queue in compliance with Manchu custom during the Qing dynasty
Zhang Zeduan's painting Along the River During the Qingming Festival captures the daily life of people from the Song dynasty at the capital, Bianjing, today's Kaifeng.
A Song dynasty Chinese painting Night Revels of Han Xizai showing scholars in scholar's robes and musicians dressed in a Hanfu variant, 12th-century remake of a 10th-century original by Gu Hongzhong.
A traditional representation of The Vinegar Tasters, an allegorical image representing Buddhists, Confucianists, and Taoists
Map showing the expansion of Han dynasty in the 2nd century BC.

Han Chinese are almost the majority in every Chinese province, municipality, and autonomous region except for the autonomous regions of Xinjiang (38% or 40% in 2010) and Tibet Autonomous Region (8% in 2014), where Uighurs and Tibetans are the majority, respectively.

The Manchus of the Qing dynasty then allied with former Ming general Wu Sangui and seized control of Beijing.