Manjul Bhargava

BhargavaManjul BharğavaBhargava, Manjul
Manjul Bhargava (born 8 August 1974) is a Canadian-American mathematician.wikipedia
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Morgan Prize

Frank and Brennie Morgan Prize for Outstanding Research in Mathematics by an Undergraduate Student
For his research as an undergraduate, he was awarded the 1996 Morgan Prize. In addition, he won the Morgan Prize and Hertz Fellowship in 1996, a Clay 5-year Research Fellowship, the Merten M. Hasse Prize from the MAA in 2003, the Clay Research Award in 2005, and the Leonard M. and Eleanor B. Blumenthal Award for the Advancement of Research in Pure Mathematics in 2005.

Plainedge High School

Plainedge
He attended Plainedge High School in North Massapequa, and graduated in 1992 as the class valedictorian.

North Massapequa, New York

North MassapequaNorth Massepequa
He attended Plainedge High School in North Massapequa, and graduated in 1992 as the class valedictorian.

Fields Medal

Fields MedalistFields Prize in MathematicsFields Medalists
Bhargava was awarded the Fields Medal in 2014.
In 2014, Maryam Mirzakhani became the first woman as well as the first Iranian to win the Fields Medal, and Artur Avila became the first South American and Manjul Bhargava became the first person of Indian origin to do so.

Bhargava factorial

In mathematics, Bhargava's factorial function, or simply Bhargava factorial, is a certain generalization of the factorial function developed by the Fields Medal winning mathematician Manjul Bhargava as part of his thesis in Harvard University in 1996.

SASTRA Ramanujan Prize

He won the $10,000 SASTRA Ramanujan Prize, shared with Kannan Soundararajan, awarded by SASTRA in 2005 at Thanjavur, India, for his outstanding contributions to number theory.

Andrew Wiles

Andrew John WilesSir Andrew WilesAndrew J. Wiles
Bhargava went on to receive his doctorate from Princeton in 2001, supervised by Andrew Wiles and funded by a Hertz Fellowship.

15 and 290 theorems

15 theorem290 theorem
Manjul Bhargava found a much simpler proof which was published in 2000.

Clay Mathematics Institute

Clay Research FellowClay InstituteClay Research Fellowship
In addition, he won the Morgan Prize and Hertz Fellowship in 1996, a Clay 5-year Research Fellowship, the Merten M. Hasse Prize from the MAA in 2003, the Clay Research Award in 2005, and the Leonard M. and Eleanor B. Blumenthal Award for the Advancement of Research in Pure Mathematics in 2005.
Its recipients to date are Ian Agol, Manindra Agrawal, Yves Benoist, Manjul Bhargava, Tristan Buckmaster, Danny Calegari, Alain Connes, Nils Dencker, Alex Eskin, David Gabai, Ben Green, Mark Gross, Larry Guth, Christopher Hacon, Richard S. Hamilton, Michael Harris, Philip Isett, Jeremy Kahn, Nets Katz, Laurent Lafforgue, Gérard Laumon, Aleksandr Logunov, Eugenia Malinnikova, Vladimir Markovic, James McKernan, Jason Miller, Maryam Mirzakhani, Ngô Bảo Châu, Rahul Pandharipande, Jonathan Pila, Jean-François Quint, Peter Scholze, Oded Schramm, Scott Sheffield, Bernd Siebert, Stanislav Smirnov, Terence Tao, Clifford Taubes, Richard Taylor, Maryna Viazovska, Vlad Vicol, Claire Voisin, Jean-Loup Waldspurger, Andrew Wiles, Geordie Williamson, Edward Witten and Wei Zhang.

Binary quadratic form

binary formsbinary quadratic formsbinary
His PhD thesis generalized Gauss's classical law for composition of binary quadratic forms to many other situations.
This includes numerous results about quadratic number fields, which can often be translated into the language of binary quadratic forms, but also includes developments about forms themselves or that originated by thinking about forms, including Shanks's infrastructure, Zagier's reduction algorithm, Conway's topographs, and Bhargava's reinterpretation of composition through Bhargava cubes.

Clay Research Award

In addition, he won the Morgan Prize and Hertz Fellowship in 1996, a Clay 5-year Research Fellowship, the Merten M. Hasse Prize from the MAA in 2003, the Clay Research Award in 2005, and the Leonard M. and Eleanor B. Blumenthal Award for the Advancement of Research in Pure Mathematics in 2005.

Kannan Soundararajan

Soundararajan, Kannan
He won the $10,000 SASTRA Ramanujan Prize, shared with Kannan Soundararajan, awarded by SASTRA in 2005 at Thanjavur, India, for his outstanding contributions to number theory.
In 2005, he won the $10,000 SASTRA Ramanujan Prize, shared with Manjul Bhargava, awarded by SASTRA in Thanjavur, India, for his outstanding contributions to number theory.

Infosys Prize

InfosysInfosys Prize in Social ScienceInfosys Science Foundation Prize
He was awarded the 2012 Infosys Prize in mathematics for his "extraordinarily original work in algebraic number theory, which has revolutionized the way in which number fields and elliptic curves are counted".

Melanie Wood

Melanie E. WoodWood, Melanie
She completed her Ph.D. in 2009 at Princeton University (under Manjul Bhargava) and is currently Chancellor's Professor of Mathematics at UC Berkeley, after being Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor of Mathematics at the University of Wisconsin and spending 2 years as Szegö Assistant Professor at Stanford University.

Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture

Birch–Swinnerton-Dyer conjectureBirch-Swinnerton-Dyer conjectureconjecture of Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer
In 2015 Manjul Bhargava and Arul Shankar proved the Birch and Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture for a positive proportion of elliptic curves.

Bhargava cube

This configuration was extensively used by Manjul Bhargava, a Canadian-American Fields Medal winning mathematician, to study the composition laws of binary quadratic forms and other such forms.

Fermat Prize

In 2011, he was awarded the Fermat Prize for "various generalizations of the Davenport-Heilbronn estimates and for his startling recent results (with Arul Shankar) on the average rank of elliptic curves".

National Museum of Mathematics

Museum of MathematicsMoMath
In 2018 Bhargava was named as the inaugural occupant of The Distinguished Chair for the Public Dissemination of Mathematics at The National Museum of Mathematics (MoMath).
Princeton professor and Fields Medal winner Manjul Bhargava was named as the first recipient of this position.

Cole Prize

Frank Nelson Cole PrizeFrank Nelson Cole Prize in Number TheoryCole Prize in Number Theory
In 2008, Bhargava was awarded the American Mathematical Society's Cole Prize.

Rank of an elliptic curve

average rank of elliptic curvesrankranks of elliptic curves
Bhargava and Shankar showed that the average rank of elliptic curves is bounded above by 1.5 and 1.17 without assuming either the Birch–Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture or the Generalized Riemann Hypothesis.

Alison Miller

Alison B. MillerMiller, Alison
She earned her Ph.D. from Princeton University in 2014, under the supervision of Manjul Bhargava; her dissertation concerned knot invariants.

Canadian Americans

Canadian-AmericanCanadian AmericanCanadian
Manjul Bhargava (born 8 August 1974) is a Canadian-American mathematician.

Princeton University

PrincetonPrinceton CollegeCollege of New Jersey
He is the R. Brandon Fradd Professor of Mathematics at Princeton University, the Stieltjes Professor of Number Theory at Leiden University, and also holds Adjunct Professorships at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, and the University of Hyderabad.