Manor of Powderham

Powderham
Powderham is a former manor on the coast of south Devon, England, situated within the historic hundred of Exminster, about 6 mi south of the city of Exeter and adjacent to the north-east of the village of Kenton.wikipedia
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Powderham Castle

PowderhamRiver Kenn
It consists in part of flat, formerly marshy ground on the west bank of the River Exe estuary where it is joined by its tributary the River Kenn, the site of Powderham Castle, originally the fortified manor house of Powderham.
Powderham Castle is a fortified manor house situated within the parish and former manor of Powderham, within the former hundred of Exminster, Devon, about 6 mi south of the city of Exeter and 1⁄4 mile (0.4 km) north-east of the village of Kenton, where the main public entrance gates are located.

Philip Courtenay (died 1406)

Sir Philip CourtenayPhilip CourtenayPhilip de Courtenay
Margaret bequeathed Powderham in her will to her 4th son Sir Philip Courtenay (1340–1406), who thus became the founder of the junior Powderham branch of the Courtenay family.
He was the founder of the cadet dynasty known as "Courtenay of Powderham", seated at the manor of Powderham, until then a former Bohun manor of little importance, whilst the line descended from his elder brother, the Earls of Devon of the mediaeval era, continued to be seated at Tiverton Castle and Okehampton.

River Exe

ExeExe ValleyExe Head
It consists in part of flat, formerly marshy ground on the west bank of the River Exe estuary where it is joined by its tributary the River Kenn, the site of Powderham Castle, originally the fortified manor house of Powderham.
The latter is on a causeway, the South Devon Railway sea wall from Powderham to Dawlish Warren.

Peter Courtenay

Bishop
His younger son was Peter Courtenay (d.1492) Bishop of Exeter.
1463) of Powderham by Elizabeth Hungerford, daughter of Walter Hungerford, 1st Baron Hungerford (d.

Robert Cary (died c. 1431)

Robert Cary
Much of his time was spent away from Powderham, which manor together with Chivelstone, he leased to his brother-in-law Sir Robert Cary (d.
In December 1415 Richard Courtenay, who by then had inherited Powderham and other estates following the death of his father, died at the Siege of Harfleur, leaving his 11-year-old nephew Philip Courtenay (1404–1463) as his heir.

Thomas de Courtenay, 5th/13th Earl of Devon

Thomas de Courtenay, 5th Earl of DevonThomas Courtenay, 13th Earl of DevonThomas de Courtenay, 13th Earl of Devon
His younger son James Courtenay founded a branch of the family seated at Upcott, Cheriton Fitzpaine, Devon, formerly the seat of the prominent Devonshire lawyer and MP Nicholas Radford (d.1455), notoriously murdered there by henchmen of Thomas de Courtenay, 5th/13th Earl of Devon (1414–1458), of Tiverton Castle, which event was a precursor to the private Battle of Clyst Heath (1455), between Thomas de Courtenay, 5th Earl of Devon (1414–1458) and his great rival William Bonville, 1st Baron Bonville (1392–1461).
The new earl found the political situation in Devonshire increasingly stacked against his own interests as a coalition of the greater gentry, led by William Bonville, 1st Baron Bonville, and the earl's cousin, Sir Philip Courtenay of Powderham, threatened the Courtenays’ traditional dominance of the county.

William Courtenay (died 1630)

William Courtenay, de jure 3rd Earl of DevonSir William V CourtenayWilliam Courtenay
Sir William Courtenay (1553–1630), de jure 3rd Earl of Devon (son).
Sir William Courtenay, Knight, (1553 – 24 June 1630) of Powderham in Devon was a prominent member of the Devonshire gentry.

William Courtenay (1477–1535)

Sir William CourtenaySir William III CourtenayWilliam Courtenay
Sir William Courtenay (1477–1535) "The Great" (son).
William entered his inheritance on 24 November 1512, receiving possession of the family's principal seat, the manor of Powderham, on 11 September.

Walter Hungerford, 1st Baron Hungerford

Sir Walter HungerfordWalter HungerfordHungerford
He married Elizabeth Hungerford, daughter of Walter Hungerford, 1st Baron Hungerford (d.1449), KG, by Katherine Peverell.

Upcott, Cheriton Fitzpaine

Upcott
His younger son James Courtenay founded a branch of the family seated at Upcott, Cheriton Fitzpaine, Devon, formerly the seat of the prominent Devonshire lawyer and MP Nicholas Radford (d.1455), notoriously murdered there by henchmen of Thomas de Courtenay, 5th/13th Earl of Devon (1414–1458), of Tiverton Castle, which event was a precursor to the private Battle of Clyst Heath (1455), between Thomas de Courtenay, 5th Earl of Devon (1414–1458) and his great rival William Bonville, 1st Baron Bonville (1392–1461).
During the reign of King Henry VIII (1509-1547) Upcott was the seat of James I Courtenay, a younger son of Sir William II Courtenay (1451–1512) of Powderham, and brother of Sir William III Courtenay (1477–1535) "The Great", which family during the Wars of the Roses and at the Battle of Clyst Heath (1455) were members of the Bonville faction and were thus enemies of their distant cousins the Courtenay Earls of Devon of Tiverton Castle.

Hugh Courtenay, 18th Earl of Devon

Hugh Rupert Courtenay, 18th Earl of DevonCountess of DevonEarl of Devon
Hugh Rupert Courtenay, 18th Earl of Devon (1942-2015) (son).
The Courtenay family of Powderham was a junior branch of the family descended from Sir Philip Courtenay (1340–1406), 5th or 6th son of Hugh Courtenay, 2nd Earl of Devon (1303–1377) of Tiverton Castle, Devon, by his wife Margaret de Bohun (d.1391), daughter and heiress of Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford (d.1322), by his wife Elizabeth Plantagenet, a daughter of King Edward I.

William Courtenay, 9th Earl of Devon

William CourtenayWilliam Courtenay, ''de jure'' 9th Earl of Devon3rd Viscount of Devon
William Courtenay, 9th Earl of Devon & 3rd Viscount Courtenay (1768–1835) (son) In 1831 he successfully established his right to the Earldom of Devon created in 1553, thus retrospectively making his ancestors Earls of Devon de jure.
His near neighbour and contemporary Rev. John Swete (1752-1821) of Oxton House, Kenton in Devon, wrote of him in veiled terms as follows in connection with a discussion of the Parsonage House of the parish of Powderham:

William Bonville, 1st Baron Bonville

William BonvilleSir William BonvilleLord Bonville
His younger son James Courtenay founded a branch of the family seated at Upcott, Cheriton Fitzpaine, Devon, formerly the seat of the prominent Devonshire lawyer and MP Nicholas Radford (d.1455), notoriously murdered there by henchmen of Thomas de Courtenay, 5th/13th Earl of Devon (1414–1458), of Tiverton Castle, which event was a precursor to the private Battle of Clyst Heath (1455), between Thomas de Courtenay, 5th Earl of Devon (1414–1458) and his great rival William Bonville, 1st Baron Bonville (1392–1461). He married Margaret Bonville, daughter of William Bonville, 1st Baron Bonville (d.1461).
Much of Bonville's retinue entered the employment of Humphrey Stafford and Bonville's old ally Sir Philip Courtenay of Powderham.

Earl of Devon

Earls of DevonEarl of Devon (1553)Earl of Devon (1141)
Sir William Courtenay (1553–1630), de jure 3rd Earl of Devon (son). Sir William Courtenay (1527–1557), de jure 2nd Earl of Devon, (grandson). William Courtenay, 1st Viscount Courtenay (1710–1762) (son), de jure 7th Earl of Devon
The baronetcy was created in the Baronetage of England during the English Civil War in February 1644 for William VI Courtenay (1628–1702) de jure 5th Earl of Devon, of Powderham, Devon.

William Courtenay, 1st Viscount Courtenay

William CourtenayWilliam Courtenay, ''de jure'' 7th Earl of DevonSir William Courtenay
William Courtenay, 1st Viscount Courtenay (1710–1762) (son), de jure 7th Earl of Devon
He was buried on 31 May 1762 at Powderham, Devon, England.

Nicholas Radford

Nicholas Radford (d.1455)Radford
His younger son James Courtenay founded a branch of the family seated at Upcott, Cheriton Fitzpaine, Devon, formerly the seat of the prominent Devonshire lawyer and MP Nicholas Radford (d.1455), notoriously murdered there by henchmen of Thomas de Courtenay, 5th/13th Earl of Devon (1414–1458), of Tiverton Castle, which event was a precursor to the private Battle of Clyst Heath (1455), between Thomas de Courtenay, 5th Earl of Devon (1414–1458) and his great rival William Bonville, 1st Baron Bonville (1392–1461).
His seat of Upcott was however later the seat of James Courtenay, a younger son of Sir William II Courtenay (1451–1512) of Powderham, and brother of Sir William III Courtenay (1477–1535) "The Great", which family during the Wars of the Roses and at the Battle of Clyst Heath (1455) were members of the Bonville faction and were thus enemies of their distant cousins the Courtenay Earls of Devon of Tiverton Castle.

William Waller

Sir William WallerWallerGeneral Waller
He married Margaret Waller (d.1694), daughter of Sir William Waller, a parliamentary general in the Civil War, and eventual heiress of her maternal grandfather Sir Richard Reynell (d.1633) of Forde, Wolborough, Devon, where he had built a new mansion in about 1610.

Manor

manorswastehavezate
Powderham is a former manor on the coast of south Devon, England, situated within the historic hundred of Exminster, about 6 mi south of the city of Exeter and adjacent to the north-east of the village of Kenton.

Devon

DevonshireDevon, EnglandCounty of Devon
Powderham is a former manor on the coast of south Devon, England, situated within the historic hundred of Exminster, about 6 mi south of the city of Exeter and adjacent to the north-east of the village of Kenton.

Hundred (county division)

hundredwapentakehundreds
Powderham is a former manor on the coast of south Devon, England, situated within the historic hundred of Exminster, about 6 mi south of the city of Exeter and adjacent to the north-east of the village of Kenton.

Exeter

City of ExeterExeter, EnglandExeter, Devon
Powderham is a former manor on the coast of south Devon, England, situated within the historic hundred of Exminster, about 6 mi south of the city of Exeter and adjacent to the north-east of the village of Kenton.

Kenton, Devon

Kentonhome town
Powderham is a former manor on the coast of south Devon, England, situated within the historic hundred of Exminster, about 6 mi south of the city of Exeter and adjacent to the north-east of the village of Kenton.

Manor house

manorhousemanorfortified manor house
It consists in part of flat, formerly marshy ground on the west bank of the River Exe estuary where it is joined by its tributary the River Kenn, the site of Powderham Castle, originally the fortified manor house of Powderham.

Lympstone

Lympstone, Devon
On the opposite side of the Exe is the small village of Lympstone and almost opposite is Nutwell Court in the parish of Woodbury, formerly the castle or fortified manor house of the powerful mediaeval Dynham family.

Nutwell

Nutwell CourtNutwell ''CourtNutwell Estate
On the opposite side of the Exe is the small village of Lympstone and almost opposite is Nutwell Court in the parish of Woodbury, formerly the castle or fortified manor house of the powerful mediaeval Dynham family.