Manuel L. Quezon

Manuel QuezonManuel Luis QuezonQuezonPresident QuezonPresident Manuel L. QuezonManuel L. QuezónManuel QuezónManuél Luís Quezon y MolinaPresident Manuel Luis QuezonPresident Manuel Quezon
Manuel Luis Quezon y Molina (19 August 1878 – 1 August 1944) was a Filipino statesman, soldier and politician who served as president of the Commonwealth of the Philippines from 1935 to 1944.wikipedia
706 Related Articles

Emilio Aguinaldo

AguinaldoGeneral Emilio AguinaldoGen. Emilio Aguinaldo
He was the first Filipino to head a government of the entire Philippines (as opposed to the government of previous Philippine states), and is considered to have been the second president of the Philippines, after Emilio Aguinaldo (1899–1901).
In 1935, Aguinaldo ran unsuccessfully for president of the Philippine Commonwealth against Manuel Quezon.

Commonwealth of the Philippines

Philippine CommonwealthPhilippinesCommonwealth
Manuel Luis Quezon y Molina (19 August 1878 – 1 August 1944) was a Filipino statesman, soldier and politician who served as president of the Commonwealth of the Philippines from 1935 to 1944.
The bill, however, was opposed by the then-Philippine Senate President Manuel L. Quezon and was also rejected by the Philippine Senate.

Colegio de San Juan de Letran

LetranLetran CollegeColegio de San Juan de Letrán
Although both his parents must have contributed to his education, he received most of his primary education from the public school established by the Spanish government in his village, as part of the establishment of the free public education system in the Philippines, as he himself testified during his speech delivered in the House of Representatives of the United States during the discussion of Jones Bill, in 1914. He later boarded at the Colegio de San Juan de Letran where he completed secondary school.
The campus contains two statues, representing the two foremost alumni in the fields of secular and religious service: former Philippine President Manuel L. Quezon and Vietnamese Saint Vicente Liem de la Paz.

President of the Philippines

PresidentPhilippine PresidentPresidents
He was the first Filipino to head a government of the entire Philippines (as opposed to the government of previous Philippine states), and is considered to have been the second president of the Philippines, after Emilio Aguinaldo (1899–1901). 144''. This highest of advisory bodies to the President was henceforth to be composed of the President, the Vice-President, Senate President, House Speaker, Senate President pro tempore, House Speaker pro tempore, Majority Floor leader of both chambers of Congress, former Presidents of the Philippines, and some three to five prominent citizens.
In October 1935, Manuel L. Quezon was elected the first President of the Commonwealth of the Philippines, which had been established, still under United States sovereignty, under a constitution ratified on 14 May of that year.

Quezon Memorial Circle

Quezon City Memorial CircleQuezon MemorialQuezon Memorial National Park
His final resting place is the Quezon Memorial Circle.
Its main feature is a 66 m tall mausoleum containing the remains of Manuel L. Quezon, the second official President of the Philippines and the first of an internationally recognized independent Philippines, and his wife, First Lady Aurora Quezon.

Nacionalista Party

NacionalistaNPNac.
In 1922, Quezon became the leader of the Nacionalista Party alliance Partido Nacionalista-Colectivista.
The Nacionalista Party is the oldest political party in the Philippines and in Southeast Asia, responsible for leading the country throughout the majority of the 20th century since its founding in 1907, being the ruling party from 1935 to 1946 (under Presidents Manuel Quezon and Sergio Osmeña), 1953–1961 (under Presidents Ramon Magsaysay and Carlos P. Garcia) and 1965–1972 (under President Ferdinand Marcos).

Aurora (province)

AuroraAurora provinceAurora Province, Philippines
Quezon, was born in Baler in the district of El Príncipe (now Baler, Aurora).
Aurora was, in fact, named after Aurora Aragon, the wife of Pres. Manuel L. Quezon, the president of the Philippine Commonwealth, after whom the mother province was named.

Saranac Lake, New York

Saranac LakeSaranac Lake, NYSaranac
It was during his exile in the U.S. that he died of tuberculosis at Saranac Lake, New York.
Among the last of the prominent patients who sought treatment for tuberculosis was Manuel Luis Quezon y Molina, the first Filipino president of the Commonwealth of the Philippines, who died in Saranac Lake of the disease on August 1, 1944.

José Abad Santos

Jose Abad SantosAbad SantosChief Justice Jose Abad Santos
He briefly served as the Acting President of the Commonwealth of the Philippines and Acting Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the Philippines during World War II, on behalf of President Quezon after the government went in exile to the United States.

Baler, Aurora

Baler BalerAurora
Quezon, was born in Baler in the district of El Príncipe (now Baler, Aurora).
It was supported by then President Manuel L. Quezon and enjoyed the collaboration of artists Fortunato Esoreña and Alejandro Ferreras and arnis expert Antonino Ramos.

Manila

Manila, PhilippinesCity of ManilaMaynila
He was buried in the Arlington National Cemetery until the end of World War II, when his remains were moved to Manila.
In 1948, President Elpidio Quirino moved the seat of government of the Philippines to Quezon City, a new capital in the suburbs and fields northeast of Manila, created in 1939 during the administration of President Manuel L. Quezon.

Benigno Aquino III

Benigno S. Aquino IIINoynoy AquinoBenigno Aquino
President Benigno Aquino III, and then-94-year-old María Zenaida Quezon Avanceña, who is the daughter of the former President, were informed about this recognition.
Malacañang Park was intended as a recreational retreat by former President Manuel L. Quezon.

Philippine Assembly

First Philippine Assemblylower houseAssemblyman
In 1907, he was elected to the first Philippine Assembly – which later became the House of Representatives – where he served as majority floor leader and chairman of the committee on rules as well as the chairman also of the committee on appropriations.
The Assembly was inaugurated on October 16, 1907 with Sergio Osmeña as Speaker of the Assembly, Manuel L. Quezon as majority leader, and Vicente Singson as minority leader.

Claro M. Recto

Claro RectoClaro Mayo RectoC.M. Recto
The Tydings–McDuffie Act was written to replace the Hare–Hawes–Cutting Act which, through the urging of Manuel L. Quezon, was rejected by the Philippine Senate.

Jose P. Laurel

José P. LaurelJosé LaurelJose Laurel
When Japan invaded, President Manuel L. Quezon first fled to Bataan and then to the United States to establish a government-in-exile.

President of the Senate of the Philippines

Senate PresidentPresident of the SenateSenate President of the Philippines
144''. This highest of advisory bodies to the President was henceforth to be composed of the President, the Vice-President, Senate President, House Speaker, Senate President pro tempore, House Speaker pro tempore, Majority Floor leader of both chambers of Congress, former Presidents of the Philippines, and some three to five prominent citizens.
Representation was by senatorial district; Manuel L. Quezon was elected senator from the now-defunct 5th Legislative District.

House of Representatives of the Philippines

DistrictHouse of RepresentativesPhilippine House of Representatives
144''. This highest of advisory bodies to the President was henceforth to be composed of the President, the Vice-President, Senate President, House Speaker, Senate President pro tempore, House Speaker pro tempore, Majority Floor leader of both chambers of Congress, former Presidents of the Philippines, and some three to five prominent citizens.
Under the leadership of Speaker Sergio Osmeña and Floor Leader Manuel L. Quezon, the Rules of the 59th United States Congress was substantially adopted as the Rules of the Philippine Legislature.

Tagalog language

TagalogTagalog-languageFilipino
Following a year's study, the Institute of the National Language – established in 1936 – recommended that Tagalog be adopted as the basis for the national language.
President Manuel L. Quezon then, on December 30, 1937, proclaimed the selection of the Tagalog language to be used as the basis for the evolution and adoption of the national language of the Philippines.

Arlington National Cemetery

Arlington CemeteryArlington Arlington National Cemetery
He was buried in the Arlington National Cemetery until the end of World War II, when his remains were moved to Manila.
The memorial served as the temporary resting place for two foreign heads of state or government who died in exile in the United States during World War II, Manuel L. Quezon of the Philippines and Ignacy Jan Paderewski of Poland.

Department of National Defense (Philippines)

Department of National DefenseSecretary of National DefenseDefense Secretary
Among the changes in the Executive Departments by way of modification in functions or new responsibilities, were those of the National Defense, Agriculture and Commerce, Public Works and Communications, and Health and Public Welfare.
The Department of National Defense or DND was formally organised on 1 November 1939, pursuant to Executive Order № 230 of President Manuel L. Quezon to implement Commonwealth Act № 1 or the National Defense Act of 1935 passed by the National Assembly on 31 December 1935, and Commonwealth Act № 340 creating the department.

Sergio Osmeña

OsmeñaSergio OsmenaSergio Osmeña Sr.
According to the 1935 Constitution, the official term of President Quezon was to expire on 30 December 1943 and Vice-President Sergio Osmeña would automatically succeed him to the presidency.
He was Vice President under Manuel L. Quezon.

Commission on the Filipino Language

Komisyon sa Wikang FilipinoKomisyon ng Wikang FilipinoInstitute of National Language
Following a year's study, the Institute of the National Language – established in 1936 – recommended that Tagalog be adopted as the basis for the national language.
On January 12, 1937, Former President Manuel Luis Quezón y Molina appointed the members to compose the INL.

Department of the Interior and Local Government

Department of Interior and Local GovernmentDILGSecretary of the Interior and Local Government
President Quezon ordered the transfer of the Philippine Constabulary from the Department of Interior, to the Department of Finance.
Manuel L. Quezon abolished the department via Executive Order 390.

Basilio J. Valdes

Basilio J. ValdezBasilio ValdesBasilio Valdez
Valdes was chief of staff of the Philippine Armed Forces from 1939, and was in 1941 appointed Secretary of National Defense by President Manuel L. Quezon.