Manuel da Nóbrega

Manoel da NóbregaManuel da NobregaNobregaNóbrega
Manuel da Nóbrega (old spelling Manoel da Nóbrega) (18 October 1517 – 18 October 1570) was a Portuguese Jesuit priest and first Provincial of the Society of Jesus in colonial Brazil.wikipedia
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Espírito Santo

Espirito SantoEspírito Santo stateES
The Tamoio and Tupiniquim tribes, who lived along the Brazilian coast from the present-day states of Espírito Santo to Paraná, were most affected.

Paraná (state)

ParanáParaná statePR
The Tamoio and Tupiniquim tribes, who lived along the Brazilian coast from the present-day states of Espírito Santo to Paraná, were most affected.

Vocabulary

vocabularieslexicalactive vocabulary
Anchieta's command of Tupi, the language spoken by most of the Indians (of which he had compiled a vocabulary and a grammar, was extremely useful to Nóbrega, who had no such ability.

Grammar

grammaticalgrammaticallyrules of language
Anchieta's command of Tupi, the language spoken by most of the Indians (of which he had compiled a vocabulary and a grammar, was extremely useful to Nóbrega, who had no such ability.

Guanabara Bay

GuanabaraBay of GuanabaraBaía da Guanabara
The arrival of a French invasion force in 1555, in the Guanabara Bay, Rio de Janeiro (the so-called France Antarctique episode), however, tipped the balance again since the Indians saw an opportunity to rally the Frenchmen's help to vanquish the Portuguese.

History of the Catholic Church in Brazil

History of Roman Catholicism in Brazilthe Church
The first Jesuits, guided by Father Manuel da Nóbrega and including prominent figures such as Juan de Azpilcueta Navarro, Leonardo Nunes and later José de Anchieta, established the first Jesuit missions in Salvador and in São Paulo dos Campos de Piratininga, the settlement that gave rise to the city of São Paulo.

Chico Xavier

Francisco Cândido XavierFrancisco Candido 'Chico' Xavier
Later on, the Medium found out that Emmanuel had been the Roman senator Publius Lentulus, further reborn as a slave who sympathized with Christianity, still in another reincarnation, had been a Jesuit priest Manuel da Nóbrega, involved with the gospel teachings during the colonial period of Brazil in the 18th century.

Catholic Church in Latin America

Catholic ChurchLatin AmericaRoman Catholic
Jesuit priests such as Manuel da Nóbrega and José de Anchieta founded several towns in Brazil in the 16th century, including São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, and were very influential in the pacification, religious conversion and education of Indian nations.

Basilica of the Immaculate Conception, Salvador

Basilica of the Immaculate ConceptionBasílica Nossa Senhora da Conceição da PraiaChurch of Conceição da Praia
Father Manuel da Nóbrega (1517-1570) and six Jesuit clergymen personally built a small mud-walled chapel at the base of the slope between the current upper and lower city.

October 18

18 October1810/18

Francisco Xavier de Mendonça Furtado

The first arrival of Jesuits included four priests and two lay brothers under the leadership of Manuel da Nóbrega (Manoel according to the old spelling) who travelled to Brazil with Sousa.

Barra (neighborhood)

BarraLadeira da BarraBarra neighborhood
It was here that Salvador founder Tomé de Souza (1515-1579), Brazil's first governor-general, arrived in 1549 with several ships and over 1,000 people, like sailors, soldiers, Jesuit priests led by Manuel da Nóbrega, laborers, and degredados, or people forced to exile.

16th century

sixteenth century16th16th-century

Cathedral Basilica of Salvador

Cathedral of Salvadorcity's cathedralJesuit Church of Salvador
The Jesuits arrived in the city in the 1549 and planned a Jesuit college under Father Manuel da Nóbrega (1517-1570).

Chapel of Our Lady of Help

Church of Our Lady of Help
The Jesuits built the first Chapel of Our Lady of Help in 1549 under the supervision of Manuel da Nóbrega (1517-1570).

Conquistador

conquistadorsconquistadoresSpanish conquistadors
Mem de Sá was supporting of Jesuit priests, Fathers Manuel da Nóbrega and José de Anchieta, who founded São Vicente in 1532, and São Paulo, in 1554.