March (territorial entity)

marchmarchesMarkfrontier marchborderlandmarcherMarchemarchlandMargraviatefrontier district
A march or mark was, in broad terms, a medieval European term for any kind of borderland, as opposed to a notional "heartland".wikipedia
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Margrave

margraviateMargravinemargravial
Just as counties were traditionally ruled by counts, marches gave rise to titles such as marquess (masculine) or marchioness (feminine) in England, marquis (masculine) or marquise (feminine) in France and Scotland, margrave (Markgraf i.e. "march count"; masculine) or margravine (Markgräfin i.e. "march countess", feminine) in Germany, and corresponding titles in other European states.
1551) is the English and French form of the German noble title Markgraf (Mark, meaning "march" or "mark", that is, border land, added to Graf, meaning "Count"); it is related semantically to the English title "Marcher Lord".

Border

boundaryinternational borderboundaries
A march or mark was, in broad terms, a medieval European term for any kind of borderland, as opposed to a notional "heartland".
In the past, many borders were not clearly defined lines; instead there were often intervening areas often claimed and fought over by both sides, sometimes called marchlands.

Mercia

Kingdom of MerciaMercianMercian kingdom
The Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Mercia took its name from West Saxon mearc "marches", which in this instance referred explicitly to the territory's position on the Anglo-Saxon frontier with the Romano-British to the west.
The name is a Latinisation of the Old English Mierce or Myrce, meaning "border people" (see March).

Septimania

GothiaMarch of GothiaGothic March
After some early setbacks, Charlemagne's son Louis ventured beyond the province of Septimania and took Barcelona from the Moorish emir in 801.
Septimania became a march of the Carolingian Empire and then West Francia down to the thirteenth century, though it was culturally and politically autonomous from northern France based central royal government.

Saxon Eastern March

Eastern MarchOstmarkSaxon Ostmark
the Saxon or Nordalbingen march between the Eider and Elbe rivers in modern Holstein, against the Obotrites; Marca Geronis (march of Gero), a precursor of the Saxon Eastern March, later divided into smaller marches (the Northern March, which later was reestablished as Margraviate of Brandenburg; the Lusatian March and the Meißen March in modern Free state of Saxony; the Zeitz March; the Merseburg March; the Milzener March around Bautzen);
The Saxon Eastern March (Sächsische Ostmark) was a march of the Holy Roman Empire from the 10th until the 12th century.

Frontier

frontiersmanfrontiersmenAmerican frontier
Such self-sufficient landholders would aid the counts in providing armed men in defense of the Frankish frontier.
The term came from French in the 15th century, with the meaning "borderland"—the region of a country that fronts on another country (see also marches).

Sorbian March

limes SorabicusSorben Mark
the Thuringian or Sorbian march on the Saale river, against the Sorbs dwelling behind the limes sorabicus;
The Sorb(ian) March (limes Sorabicus; Sorbenmark) was a frontier district on the eastern border of East Francia in the 9th through 11th centuries.

Danish March

* The Danish March (sometimes regarded as just a series of forts rather than a march) between the Eider and Schlei rivers, against the Danes;
It was established in the early Middle Ages as a March of the Frankish Empire to defend against the Danes.

Danes (Germanic tribe)

DanesDanishDane
* The Danish March (sometimes regarded as just a series of forts rather than a march) between the Eider and Schlei rivers, against the Danes;
"the march of the Danes" in Old Low German, referring to their southern border zone between the Eider and Schlei rivers, known as Danevirke.

March of Merseburg

MerseburgMargrave of Merseburg
the March of Lusatia, March of Meissen, March of Merseburg and March of Zeitz;
The March of Merseburg (Mark Merseburg) was a short-lived march of the Holy Roman Empire.

Avar March

the Avar march between Enns river and Wienerwald (the later marcha Orientalis), against the Avars;
The Avar March (Avaria, Awarenmark) was a southeastern frontier district of the Carolingian Empire, established in the late 8th century by Charlemagne against the Eurasian Avars on the Danube River, in what is today Lower Austria.

March of Pannonia

PannoniaMargrave of PannoniaUpper Pannonia
the Pannonian march east of Vienna (divided into Upper and Lower);
The Eastern March (marcha orientalis) or March of Pannonia was a frontier march of the Carolingian Empire, named after the former Roman province of Pannonia.

March of Zeitz

ZeitzMargraves of Zeitz
the March of Lusatia, March of Meissen, March of Merseburg and March of Zeitz;
The March of Zeitz (Mark Zeitz) was a march of the Holy Roman Empire.

March of Friuli

FriulimarchFrioul
the March of Friuli.
The March of Friuli was a Carolingian frontier march, established in 776 as the continuation of the Lombard Duchy of Friuli, established against the Slavs and Avars.

Cerdanya

CerdagneCerretanacounty of Cerdagne
Counties in the Pyrenees that appeared in the 9th century as appanages of the counts of Barcelona included Cerdanya, Girona and Urgell.
The county of Cerdanya has its origin in the Spanish Marches established by Charlemagne.

Billung March

Billungmarch named after themMarch of the Billungs
the March of the Billungs on the Baltic coast, stretching approximately from Stettin (Szczecin) to Schleswig;
The Billung March (Billunger Mark) or March of the Billungs (Mark der Billunger) was a frontier region of the far northeastern Duchy of Saxony in the 10th century.

Marquess

marquismarquisatemarquessate
Just as counties were traditionally ruled by counts, marches gave rise to titles such as marquess (masculine) or marchioness (feminine) in England, marquis (masculine) or marquise (feminine) in France and Scotland, margrave (Markgraf i.e. "march count"; masculine) or margravine (Markgräfin i.e. "march countess", feminine) in Germany, and corresponding titles in other European states.
In times past, the distinction between a count and a marquess was that the land of a marquess, called a march, was on the border of the country, while a count's land, called a county, often was not.

March of Lusatia

LusatiaMargrave of LusatiaLusatian
the March of Lusatia, March of Meissen, March of Merseburg and March of Zeitz; Marca Geronis (march of Gero), a precursor of the Saxon Eastern March, later divided into smaller marches (the Northern March, which later was reestablished as Margraviate of Brandenburg; the Lusatian March and the Meißen March in modern Free state of Saxony; the Zeitz March; the Merseburg March; the Milzener March around Bautzen);
The March or Margraviate of Lusatia (Mark(grafschaft) Lausitz) was as an eastern border march of the Holy Roman Empire in the lands settled by Polabian Slavs.

Margravate of Meissen

MeissenMargraves of MeissenMarch of Meissen
the Thuringian or Sorbian march on the Saale river, against the Sorbs dwelling behind the limes sorabicus; the March of Lusatia, March of Meissen, March of Merseburg and March of Zeitz; Marca Geronis (march of Gero), a precursor of the Saxon Eastern March, later divided into smaller marches (the Northern March, which later was reestablished as Margraviate of Brandenburg; the Lusatian March and the Meißen March in modern Free state of Saxony; the Zeitz March; the Merseburg March; the Milzener March around Bautzen);
It originally was a frontier march of the Holy Roman Empire, created out of the vast Marca Geronis (Saxon Eastern March) in 965.

Margraviate of Austria

AustriaMarch of AustriaMarcha orientalis
the Avar march between Enns river and Wienerwald (the later marcha Orientalis), against the Avars;
The Margraviate of Austria was a southeastern frontier march of the Holy Roman Empire created in 976 out of the territory on the border with the Principality of Hungary.

Marca Geronis

Saxon Eastern Marchborder regionEastern Marches
Marca Geronis (march of Gero), a precursor of the Saxon Eastern March, later divided into smaller marches (the Northern March, which later was reestablished as Margraviate of Brandenburg; the Lusatian March and the Meißen March in modern Free state of Saxony; the Zeitz March; the Merseburg March; the Milzener March around Bautzen);
The Marca Geronis (march of Gero) was a vast super-march in the middle of the tenth century.

Charlemagne

CharlesCharles the GreatEmperor Charlemagne
After some early setbacks, Charlemagne's son Louis ventured beyond the province of Septimania and took Barcelona from the Moorish emir in 801.
The Duchy of Spoleto south of Rome was acquired in 774, while in the central western parts of Europe, the Duchy of Bavaria was absorbed and the Bavarian policy continued of establishing tributary marches, (borders protected in return for tribute or taxes) among the Slavic Serbs and Czechs.

March of Styria

StyriaMargrave of StyriaMarch
the Carantania march or March of Styria (Steiermark);
The March of Styria (Steiermark), originally known as Carantanian march (Karantanische Mark, marchia Carantana after the former Slavic principality of Carantania), was a southeastern frontier march of the Holy Roman Empire.

Windic March

WindicSlovene MarchSlovene (or Windic) March
the Krain or March of Carniola, also Windic march and White Carniola (White March), in modern Slovenia.
The Windic March (Windische Mark; also known as Wendish March) was a medieval frontier march of the Holy Roman Empire, roughly corresponding to the Lower Carniola (Dolenjska) region in present-day Slovenia.

Altmark

Altmark (Old March)Old March
Altmark ("Old March"), the western region of the former margraviate, between Hamburg and Magdeburg.
The Altmark (English: Old March ) is a historic region in Germany, comprising the northern third of Saxony-Anhalt.