Marching band

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A marching band is a group in which instrumental musicians perform while marching, often for entertainment or competition.wikipedia
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Parade

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In addition to traditional parade performances, many marching bands also perform field shows at sporting events and marching band competitions.
A parade (also called march or marchpast) is a procession of people, usually organized along a street, often in costume, and often accompanied by marching bands, floats, or sometimes large balloons.

Military band

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The development of the military band from such predecessors was a gradual development of the medieval and early modern period.
The military band is capable of playing ceremonial and marching music, including the national anthems and patriotic songs of not only their own nation but others as well, both while stationary and as a marching band.

Ottoman military band

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A prototype of the Ottoman military band may be mentioned in the 11th-century Divânu Lügati't-Türk.
Ottoman military bands are thought to be the oldest variety of military marching bands in the world.

Band of the Fighting Irish

Notre Dame Marching BandNotre Dame Concert Band
The oldest American college marching band, the University of Notre Dame Band of the Fighting Irish, was founded in 1845 and first performed at a football game in 1887.
The Band of the Fighting Irish is the marching band of the University of Notre Dame.

Percussion instrument

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Instrumentation typically includes brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments.
In military marching bands and pipes and drums, it is the beat of the bass drum that keeps the soldiers in step and at a regular speed, and it is the snare that provides that crisp, decisive air to the tune of a regiment.

Marching Illini

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The first halftime show at an American football game was performed by the University of Illinois Marching Illini, also in 1907, at a game against the University of Chicago.
The Marching Illini (MI) is the marching band of the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

Majorette (dancer)

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During the 20th century, many marching bands added further pageantry elements, including baton twirlers, majorettes, dance lines, and color guard.
A majorette is a baton twirler whose twirling performance is often accompanied by dance, movement, or gymnastics; they are primarily associated with marching bands during parades.

Front ensemble

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For bands that include a front ensemble (also known as the pit or auxiliary percussion), stationary instrumentation may include orchestral percussion such as timpani, tambourines, maracas, cowbells, congas, wood blocks, marimbas, xylophones, bongos, vibraphones, timbales, claves, guiros, and chimes or tubular bells, concert bass drums, and gongs, as well as a multitude of auxiliary percussion equipment, all depending on the instrumentation of the field show.
In a marching band or a drum and bugle corps, the front ensemble or pit is the stationary percussion ensemble.

Fightin' Texas Aggie Band

Aggie BandFightin’ Texas Aggie Band
Due to a lack of appreciation, competition venues, and military personnel, almost all military marching bands have disappeared from schools in the United States, with exceptions including the Fightin' Texas Aggie Band from Texas A&M University, the Highty-Tighties of the Virginia Tech Corps of Cadets, and the Cadets of Norwich University Military College of Vermont.
The Fightin' Texas Aggie Band (also known as the Noble Men of Kyle or just the Aggie Band) is the official marching band of Texas A&M University.

Baton twirling

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A marching band is typically led by one to three or, occasionally, four or more drum majors, also called field commanders, who are usually responsible for conducting the band (sometimes using a large baton or mace, though such tools are used rarely in modern marching bands for conducting) and are commonly referred to as the leader of the band.
Majorettes, twirl in a group for a high school or college with its marching band.

Music education

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After World War I, the presence and quality of marching bands in the American public school system expanded as military veterans with service band experience began to accept music teaching positions within schools across the country, eventually bringing wind music and marching band into both educational curriculum and school culture.
In primary and secondary schools, students may often have the opportunity to perform in some type of musical ensemble, such as a choir, orchestra, or school band: concert band, marching band, or jazz band.

Halftime show

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The first halftime show at an American football game was performed by the University of Illinois Marching Illini, also in 1907, at a game against the University of Chicago.
A modern halftime show can consist of cheerleading performances, majorette routines, marching bands playing music, or other spectacular performances.

Purdue All-American Marching Band

Purdue BandGolden GirlAll-American Marching Band
In 1907, breaking from traditional rank and file marching, the first pictorial formation on a football field was the "Block P" created by Paul Spotts Emrick, director of the Purdue All-American Marching Band. These shows normally consists of three to five musical pieces accompanied by formations rooted in origin from Patterns in Motion, a book penned by band director William C. "Bill" Moffit, bandmaster of Purdue University All-American Marching Band and University of Houston Spirit of Houston.
The Purdue "All-American" Marching Band (or AAMB) is the marching band of Purdue University and the main source of auxiliary entertainment for Purdue Boilermakers football games.

Scramble band

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Scramble bands (also referred to as 'Scatter' bands) are a variation on show bands.
A scramble band - also known as a scatter band - is a particular type of field-performing marching band with distinct characteristics that set it apart from other common forms of marching bands; most notably, scramble bands do not normally march.

Marching

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A marching band is a group in which instrumental musicians perform while marching, often for entertainment or competition.
Music is provided by marching bands including silver bands, flute bands and others.

Corps style band

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Corps Style bands directly reflect the trends seen in modern drum and bugle corps of Drum Corps International (DCI).
A Corps style band is a type of marching band based on those of Drum Corps International.

Drum and bugle corps (classic)

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This style includes field music units such as drum and bugle corps or bugle bands, pipe bands, and fife and drum corps.
Drum and bugle corps have often been mistaken for marching bands, since there is a similarity to both groups having horns and drums; and they are both essentially bands of musicians that march.

Alto saxophone

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Some bands omit some or all woodwinds, but it is not uncommon to see piccolos, flutes, soprano clarinets, alto saxophones, and tenor saxophones (woodwinds are not used in corps style marching).
The alto sax is the most common saxophone and is commonly used in concert bands, chamber music, solo repertoire, military bands, marching bands, and jazz (such as big bands, jazz combos, swing music).

E-flat clarinet

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E♭ clarinets, alto clarinets, bass clarinets, and baritone saxophones are less common, but can be found in some bands.
The E clarinet is used in orchestras, concert bands, marching bands, and plays a particularly central role in clarinet choirs, carrying the high melodies that would be treacherous for the B clarinet.

Bill Moffit

William C. MoffitWilliam C. "Bill" Moffit
These shows normally consists of three to five musical pieces accompanied by formations rooted in origin from Patterns in Motion, a book penned by band director William C. "Bill" Moffit, bandmaster of Purdue University All-American Marching Band and University of Houston Spirit of Houston.
William C. "Bill" Moffit (born May 12, 1925 in New Philadelphia, Ohio; died March 5, 2008 in Jacksonville, Florida) was an American musician, music arranger and marching band director, best known for his innovations in marching band show techniques and for hundreds of arrangements for marching bands.

Bass clarinet

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E♭ clarinets, alto clarinets, bass clarinets, and baritone saxophones are less common, but can be found in some bands.
It is also used in clarinet choirs, marching bands, and in film scoring, and has played a persistent role in jazz.

Drumline

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Marching percussion (often referred to as the drumline, battery, or back battery) typically includes snare drums, tenor drums, bass drums, and cymbals and are responsible for keeping tempo for the band.
Marching bands, drum and bugle corps, and indoor percussion ensembles are some examples of groups that include a drumline.

Marching percussion

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Marching percussion (often referred to as the drumline, battery, or back battery) typically includes snare drums, tenor drums, bass drums, and cymbals and are responsible for keeping tempo for the band.
These instruments are used by marching bands, drum and bugle corps, indoor percussion ensembles, and pipe bands.

Marimba

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For bands that include a front ensemble (also known as the pit or auxiliary percussion), stationary instrumentation may include orchestral percussion such as timpani, tambourines, maracas, cowbells, congas, wood blocks, marimbas, xylophones, bongos, vibraphones, timbales, claves, guiros, and chimes or tubular bells, concert bass drums, and gongs, as well as a multitude of auxiliary percussion equipment, all depending on the instrumentation of the field show. Marching versions of the glockenspiel (bells), xylophone, and marimba are also rarely used by some ensembles.
Modern uses of the marimba include solo performances, woodwind and brass ensembles, marimba concertos, jazz ensembles, marching band (front ensembles), drum and bugle corps, indoor percussion ensembles, and orchestral compositions.

Mellophone

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The brass section usually includes trumpets or cornets; French horns, alto horns, or mellophones; tenor trombones; baritone horns or euphoniums; and tubas or sousaphones.
The mellophone is used as the middle-voiced brass instrument in marching bands and drum and bugle corps in place of French horns, and can also be used to play French horn parts in concert bands and orchestras.