Marcus Licinius Crassus

Bust of Crassus, in the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen
A Roman marble head of the triumvir Marcus Licinius Crassus, mid-1st century BC, Grand Palais, Paris
A Roman bust of Pompey the Great made during the reign of Augustus (27 BC – 14 AD), a copy of an original bust from 70 to 60 BC, Venice National Archaeological Museum, Italy
From left to right: Julius Caesar, Marcus Licinius Crassus, and Pompey the Great
Denarius minted by Publius Licinius Crassus, son of the triumvir Marcus, as monetalis in 55 BC; on the obverse is a laureate bust of Venus, perhaps in honor of his commanding officer Julius Caesar; on the reverse is an unidentified female figure, perhaps representing Gaul
"The torture of Crassus," 1530s, Louvre

Roman general and statesman who played a key role in the transformation of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire.

- Marcus Licinius Crassus
Bust of Crassus, in the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek, Copenhagen

62 related topics

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Depiction of Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus. Fabius was dictator in 217 BC.

Roman dictator

Extraordinary magistrate in the Roman Republic endowed with full authority to resolve some specific problem to which he had been assigned.

Extraordinary magistrate in the Roman Republic endowed with full authority to resolve some specific problem to which he had been assigned.

Depiction of Quintus Fabius Maximus Verrucosus. Fabius was dictator in 217 BC.
Head presumed to be that of Lucius Cornelius Sulla. Sulla was dictator from 82–79 BC.
Depiction of the Assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 BC, by Jean-Léon Gérôme (mid 19th century).

One version of the supposed First Catilinarian conspiracy c. 65 BC (which itself is now held in modern scholarship to be fictitious) related by Suetonius would have had the creation of a dictatorship led by Marcus Licinius Crassus with Julius Caesar as magister equitum.

Coin of Quintus Caecilius Metellus Pius

Quintus Caecilius Metellus Pius

Quintus Caecilius Metellus Pius (c.

Quintus Caecilius Metellus Pius (c.

Coin of Quintus Caecilius Metellus Pius
Fantasy portrait of Metellus Pius from Guillaume Rouillé's Promptuarii Iconum Insigniorum

He was joined by Marcus Licinius Crassus, but both men fell out, and Crassus was forced to leave and eventually join up with Sulla in Greece.

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Sulla's civil war

Fought between the Roman general Lucius Cornelius Sulla and his opponents, the Cinna-Marius faction , in the years 83–81 BC. The war ended with a decisive battle just outside Rome itself.

Fought between the Roman general Lucius Cornelius Sulla and his opponents, the Cinna-Marius faction , in the years 83–81 BC. The war ended with a decisive battle just outside Rome itself.

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As soon as he had set foot in Italy, the outlawed nobles and old Sullan supporters who had survived the Marian-Cinna regime flocked to his banner. The most prominent among them were Quintus Caecilius Metellus Pius, Marcus Licinius Crassus, and Lucius Marcius Philippus. Metellus and Crassus did so at the head of their own independently-raised armies.

Death of Publius Licinius Crassus at the hands of the Parthians ("Avarice Punished"). Publius is depicted as receiving an arrow to the chest while a soldier grabs the reins of his horse. Reverse of a medal created in 1740-1750 by Jean Dassier & sons

Publius Licinius Crassus (son of triumvir)

Death of Publius Licinius Crassus at the hands of the Parthians ("Avarice Punished"). Publius is depicted as receiving an arrow to the chest while a soldier grabs the reins of his horse. Reverse of a medal created in 1740-1750 by Jean Dassier & sons
Cicero praised Publius Crassus for his character and speaking ability
In 58 BC, Caesar led the first Roman army into Celtica; Gallia Cisalpina and the Narbonensis (or Gallia Transalpina) were already under Roman rule
Armorica, with the Seine and Loire rivers indicated in red
Denarius issued by Publius Crassus

Publius Licinius Crassus (86 or 82 BC – 53 BC) was one of two sons of Marcus Licinius Crassus, the so-called "triumvir", and Tertulla, daughter of Marcus Terentius Varro Lucullus.

Territories of the Roman civilization:

Roman censor

Magistrate in ancient Rome who was responsible for maintaining the census, supervising public morality, and overseeing certain aspects of the government's finances.

Magistrate in ancient Rome who was responsible for maintaining the census, supervising public morality, and overseeing certain aspects of the government's finances.

Territories of the Roman civilization:

If the censorship had been done away with by Sulla, it was at any rate restored in the consulship of Pompey and Marcus Licinius Crassus.

Modern portrait at Chaeronea, based on a bust from Delphi tentatively identified as Plutarch.

Plutarch

Greek Middle Platonist philosopher, historian, biographer, essayist, and priest at the Temple of Apollo in Delphi.

Greek Middle Platonist philosopher, historian, biographer, essayist, and priest at the Temple of Apollo in Delphi.

Modern portrait at Chaeronea, based on a bust from Delphi tentatively identified as Plutarch.
Ruins of the Temple of Apollo at Delphi, where Plutarch served as one of the priests responsible for interpreting the predictions of the Pythia.
Portrait of a philosopher, and a hermaic stele at the Delphi Archaeological Museum
Plutarch in the Nuremberg Chronicle
A page from the 1470 Ulrich Han printing of Plutarch's Parallel Lives
Moralia, 1531
A bust of the early Greek historian Herodotus, whom Plutarch criticized in On the Malice of Herodotus

The first volume, Roman Lives, first published in 1954, presents the translations of Joseph G. Liebes to the biographies of Coriolanus, Fabius Maximus, Tiberius Gracchus and Gaius Gracchus, Cato the Elder and Cato the Younger, Gaius Marius, Sulla, Sertorius, Lucullus, Pompey, Crassus, Cicero, Julius Caesar, Brutus and Mark Anthony.

Saylor at the 2012 Texas Book Festival

Steven Saylor

American author of historical novels.

American author of historical novels.

Saylor at the 2012 Texas Book Festival

Arms of Nemesis (1992), featuring Crassus, is set during the slave revolt of Spartacus in 72 BC.

War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy, published 1869 and set 60 years before

Masters of Rome

Series of historical novels by Australian author Colleen McCullough, set in ancient Rome during the last days of the old Roman Republic; it primarily chronicles the lives and careers of Gaius Marius, Lucius Cornelius Sulla, Pompey the Great, Gaius Julius Caesar, and the early career of Caesar Augustus.

Series of historical novels by Australian author Colleen McCullough, set in ancient Rome during the last days of the old Roman Republic; it primarily chronicles the lives and careers of Gaius Marius, Lucius Cornelius Sulla, Pompey the Great, Gaius Julius Caesar, and the early career of Caesar Augustus.

War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy, published 1869 and set 60 years before

Other major historical figures who appear and play prominent parts in the series include Mithridates VI of Pontus, Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, Publius Rutilius Rufus, Quintus Sertorius, Marcus Livius Drusus, Jugurtha of Numidia, Spartacus, Marcus Licinius Crassus, Marcus Tullius Cicero, Marcus Calpurnius Bibulus, Marcus Porcius Cato, Publius Clodius, Titus Annius Milo, Vercingetorix, Marcus Junius Brutus, Gaius Cassius Longinus, Mark Antony, Cleopatra VII of Egypt, Caesarion and Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa.

Coin of Pacorus I, Ecbatana mint

Pacorus I

Parthian prince, who was the son and heir of Orodes II ((r.

Parthian prince, who was the son and heir of Orodes II ((r.

Coin of Pacorus I, Ecbatana mint
Map of the Parthian–Roman borders, c. 55 BC
Coin of Quintus Labienus

Shortly before the Battle of Carrhae (modern Harran, southeastern Turkey) ensued between the Parthians and a Roman army, commanded by the triumvir, Marcus Licinius Crassus, Orodes II invaded Armenia, cutting off Crassus's support from his ally, the Artaxiad king Artavasdes II ((r.

Parthian mounted archer, located in Palazzo Madama, Turin.

Surena

Parthian spahbed ("general" or "commander") during the 1st century BC. He was the leader of the House of Suren and was best known for defeating the Romans in the Battle of Carrhae.

Parthian spahbed ("general" or "commander") during the 1st century BC. He was the leader of the House of Suren and was best known for defeating the Romans in the Battle of Carrhae.

Parthian mounted archer, located in Palazzo Madama, Turin.

Under his command Parthians decisively defeated a numerically superior Roman invasion force under the command of Marcus Licinius Crassus.