Marcus Loew

LoewLoew's Inc.
Marcus Loew (May 7, 1870 – September 5, 1927) was an American business magnate and a pioneer of the motion picture industry who formed Loew's Theatres and the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film studio (MGM).wikipedia
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Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

MGMMGM Studiosmgm.com
Marcus Loew (May 7, 1870 – September 5, 1927) was an American business magnate and a pioneer of the motion picture industry who formed Loew's Theatres and the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film studio (MGM).
MGM was founded in 1924 when the entertainment entrepreneur Marcus Loew gained control of Metro Pictures, Goldwyn Pictures, and Louis B. Mayer Pictures.

Nicholas Schenck

NicholasMrs. Nicholas Schenck
His associates included Adolph Zukor, Joseph Schenck, and Nicholas Schenck.
It was at this time that the Schencks made the acquaintance of Marcus Loew, a theater operator.

Joseph M. Schenck

Joseph SchenckJoe SchenckFeature Productions
His associates included Adolph Zukor, Joseph Schenck, and Nicholas Schenck.
Recognizing the potential, in 1909 the Schenck brothers purchased Palisades Amusement Park and afterward became participants in the fledgling motion picture industry in partnership with Marcus Loew, operating a chain of movie theaters.

Adolph Zukor

ZukorFamous Player's Club
His associates included Adolph Zukor, Joseph Schenck, and Nicholas Schenck. Shortly after, in partnership with Adolph Zukor and others, Loew acquired a nickelodeon and over time he turned Loew's Theatres into a leading chain of vaudeville and movie theaters in the United States.
They soon opened branches in Boston, Philadelphia, and Newark, with funding by Marcus Loew.

Leo the Lion (MGM)

Leo the LionMGM lionJackie
Goldwyn Pictures owned the "Leo the Lion" trademark and studio property in Culver City, California.
Since 1916 (and when the studio was formed by the merger of Samuel Goldwyn's studio with Marcus Loew's Metro Pictures and Louis B. Mayer's company in 1924), there have been seven different lions used for the MGM logo.

Columbia Theater (Washington, D.C.)

Columbia Theater
Outside of New York, he managed the Columbia Theatre (Washington, D.C.) Columbia Theatre (Boston) and the Metropolitan Opera House (Philadelphia).
The theater was taken over by Marcus Loew in 1915 in his first Loew's Theaters venture outside New York, to present vaudeville and movies.

Metro Pictures

MetroMetro Pictures CorporationMetro Pictures Corp.
In 1920, Loew purchased Metro Pictures Corporation.
In 1919, the company was purchased by Marcus Loew as a supplier of product for his theater chain.

Louis B. Mayer

Louis MayerMayerLouis B. Mayer Pictures
Loew recalled meeting a film producer named Louis B. Mayer who had been operating a successful, if modest, studio in east Los Angeles.
Mayer's big breakthrough, however, was in April 1924 when Marcus Loew, owner of the Loew's chain, merged Metro Pictures, Samuel Goldwyn's Goldwyn Pictures Corporation, and Mayer Pictures into Metro-Goldwyn.

Universal Pictures

UniversalUniversal StudiosUniversal Film Manufacturing Company
Since he rented most of his equipment and hired most of his stars on a per-picture basis, Loew wasn't after Mayer's brick and mortar business; he wanted Mayer and his Chief of Production, the former Universal Pictures executive, Irving Thalberg.
Unlike rivals Adolph Zukor, William Fox, and Marcus Loew, Laemmle chose not to develop a theater chain.

Samuel Goldwyn

Sam GoldwynGoldwynSamuel Goldfish
But without its founder Samuel Goldwyn, the Goldwyn studio lacked strong management.
On April 10, 1924, Goldwyn Pictures was acquired by Marcus Loew and merged into his Metro Pictures Corporation.

Loews Cineplex Entertainment

Loew's Inc.LoewLoews
Marcus Loew (May 7, 1870 – September 5, 1927) was an American business magnate and a pioneer of the motion picture industry who formed Loew's Theatres and the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film studio (MGM).
Loews Theatres, also known as Loews Incorporated (originally Loew's), founded on June 23, 1904 by Marcus Loew, was the oldest theater chain operating in North America until it merged with AMC Theatres on January 26, 2006.

Business magnate

industrialisttycoonlumber baron
Marcus Loew (May 7, 1870 – September 5, 1927) was an American business magnate and a pioneer of the motion picture industry who formed Loew's Theatres and the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film studio (MGM).

Film

motion picturemoviecinema
Marcus Loew (May 7, 1870 – September 5, 1927) was an American business magnate and a pioneer of the motion picture industry who formed Loew's Theatres and the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer film studio (MGM).

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
Loew was born in New York City, into a poor Jewish family, who had emigrated to New York City a few years previously from Austria and Germany.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
Loew was born in New York City, into a poor Jewish family, who had emigrated to New York City a few years previously from Austria and Germany.

Amusement arcade

arcadevideo arcadearcades
Nevertheless, beginning with a small investment from money saved from menial jobs, he bought into the penny arcade business.

Nickelodeon (movie theater)

nickelodeonnickelodeonsnickelodeon movie theater
Shortly after, in partnership with Adolph Zukor and others, Loew acquired a nickelodeon and over time he turned Loew's Theatres into a leading chain of vaudeville and movie theaters in the United States.

Movie theater

cinemamovie theatrecinemas
Shortly after, in partnership with Adolph Zukor and others, Loew acquired a nickelodeon and over time he turned Loew's Theatres into a leading chain of vaudeville and movie theaters in the United States.

American Music Hall

American
By 1913, Loew operated a large number of theaters in New York City including the American Music Hall, Avenue A Theatre, Avenue B Theatre, Broadway Theatre (41st St.), Circle Theatre, and the Columbia Theatre in Brooklyn.

Broadway Theatre (41st Street)

Broadway TheatreThe Broadway TheatreBroadway Theater
By 1913, Loew operated a large number of theaters in New York City including the American Music Hall, Avenue A Theatre, Avenue B Theatre, Broadway Theatre (41st St.), Circle Theatre, and the Columbia Theatre in Brooklyn.

Herald Square Theatre

Harrigan's Park TheatreHarrigan’s TheatreHerald Square Theater
Other Loew-operated theaters were the Delancey St. Theatre, Greeley Sq. Theatre, Herald Square Theatre, Liberty Theatre, Brooklyn, Lincoln Sq. Theatre, National Theatre (149th St.), Plaza Theatre, 7th Ave. Theatre (124th St.), Shubert Theatre, Brooklyn, and the Yorkville Theatre.

Columbia Theatre (Boston)

Columbia Theatre
Outside of New York, he managed the Columbia Theatre (Washington, D.C.) Columbia Theatre (Boston) and the Metropolitan Opera House (Philadelphia).

Metropolitan Opera House (Philadelphia)

Metropolitan Opera HousePhiladelphia Opera HousePhiladelphia Metropolitan Opera House
Outside of New York, he managed the Columbia Theatre (Washington, D.C.) Columbia Theatre (Boston) and the Metropolitan Opera House (Philadelphia).

Goldwyn Pictures

GoldwynGoldwyn Pictures CorporationGoldwyn Company
A few years later, he acquired a controlling interest in the financially troubled Goldwyn Picture Corporation which at that point was controlled by theater impresario Lee Shubert.

Lee Shubert

Lee
A few years later, he acquired a controlling interest in the financially troubled Goldwyn Picture Corporation which at that point was controlled by theater impresario Lee Shubert.