Margaret Mead

Dr. Margaret MeadMead, MargaretMeadthe famous anthropologist
Margaret Mead (December 16, 1901 – November 15, 1978) was an American cultural anthropologist who featured frequently as an author and speaker in the mass media during the 1960s and 1970s.wikipedia
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Cultural anthropology

cultural anthropologistcultural anthropologistscultural
Margaret Mead (December 16, 1901 – November 15, 1978) was an American cultural anthropologist who featured frequently as an author and speaker in the mass media during the 1960s and 1970s.
This was most obvious in the 'Culture and Personality' studies carried out by younger Boasians such as Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict.

Franz Boas

BoasianBoas, FranzFranz Boaz
Mead earned her bachelor's degree from Barnard in 1923, then began studying with professor Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict at Columbia University, earning her master's degree in 1924.
Among his most significant students were A. L. Kroeber, Ruth Benedict, Edward Sapir, Margaret Mead, Zora Neale Hurston, Gilberto Freyre and many others.

Sexual revolution

sexual liberationsexually liberatedsexual
Her reports detailing the attitudes towards sex in South Pacific and Southeast Asian traditional cultures influenced the 1960s sexual revolution.
The publication of anthropologist Margaret Mead's Coming of Age in Samoa brought the sexual revolution to the public scene, as her thoughts concerning sexual freedom pervaded academia.

Ruth Benedict

Patterns of CultureRuth Fulton BenedictBenedict, Ruth
Mead earned her bachelor's degree from Barnard in 1923, then began studying with professor Franz Boas and Ruth Benedict at Columbia University, earning her master's degree in 1924. Before departing for Samoa, Mead had a short affair with the linguist Edward Sapir, a close friend of her instructor Ruth Benedict.
Margaret Mead, with whom she shared a romantic relationship, and Marvin Opler, were among her students and colleagues.

American Museum of Natural History

AMNHMuseum of Natural HistoryThe American Museum of Natural History
In 1926, she joined the American Museum of Natural History, New York City, as assistant curator.
Famous names associated with the museum include the paleontologist and geologist Henry Fairfield Osborn; the dinosaur-hunter of the Gobi Desert, Roy Chapman Andrews (one of the inspirations for Indiana Jones); photographer Yvette Borup Andrews; George Gaylord Simpson; biologist Ernst Mayr; pioneer cultural anthropologists Franz Boas and Margaret Mead; explorer and geographer Alexander H. Rice, Jr.; and ornithologist Robert Cushman Murphy.

American Association for the Advancement of Science

AAASAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)American Association for the Advancement of Sciences
Mead served as President of the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1975.
Among them: explorer and geologist John Wesley Powell (1888); astronomer and physicist Edward Charles Pickering (1912); anthropologist Margaret Mead (1975); and biologist Stephen Jay Gould (2000).

Mary Catherine Bateson

Bateson, Mary CatherineMary Bateson
Mead's third and longest-lasting marriage (1936–1950) was to the British anthropologist Gregory Bateson, with whom she had a daughter, Mary Catherine Bateson, who would also become an anthropologist.
A graduate of the Brearley School, Bateson is the daughter of Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson.

Jeremy Steig

Mead was also the aunt of Jeremy Steig.
Steig was a maternal nephew of Margaret Mead and Leo Rosten, and was also the cousin of Mary Catherine Bateson.

Gregory Bateson

BatesonBateson’sGreg Bateson
Mead's third and longest-lasting marriage (1936–1950) was to the British anthropologist Gregory Bateson, with whom she had a daughter, Mary Catherine Bateson, who would also become an anthropologist.
During 1936–1950, he was married to American cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead.

Reo Fortune

Fortune, ReoR. F. Fortune
Between 1925 and 1926 she was in Samoa returning wherefrom on the boat she met Reo Fortune, a New Zealander headed to Cambridge, England, to study psychology.
He was first married to Margaret Mead in 1928, with whom he undertook field studies in New Guinea from 1931 to 1933.

Derek Freeman

In 1983, five years after Mead had died, New Zealand anthropologist Derek Freeman published Margaret Mead and Samoa: The Making and Unmaking of an Anthropological Myth, in which he challenged Mead's major findings about sexuality in Samoan society. After her death, Mead's Samoan research was criticized by anthropologist Derek Freeman, who published a book that argued against many of Mead's conclusions. Freeman argued that Mead had misunderstood Samoan culture when she argued that Samoan culture did not place many restrictions on youths' sexual explorations.
John Derek Freeman (15 August 1916 – 6 July 2001) was a New Zealand anthropologist known for his criticism of Margaret Mead's work on Samoan society, as described in her 1928 ethnography Coming of Age in Samoa.

American Anthropological Association

Political and Legal Anthropology ReviewAAASociety for the Anthropology of North America
She served as president of the American Anthropological Association in 1960.
These include the dispute between Derek Freeman and defenders of Margaret Mead, as well as the controversy over the book Darkness in El Dorado.

Longland (Holicong, Pennsylvania)

Longland
Her family owned the Longland farm from 1912 to 1926.
It was a childhood home of American anthropologist Margaret Mead (1901-1978).

William Steig

Elizabeth Mead (1909–1983), an artist and teacher, married cartoonist William Steig, and Priscilla Mead (1911–1959) married author Leo Rosten.
From 1936 to 1949, Steig was married to educator and artist Elizabeth Mead Steig (1909–1983), sister of anthropologist Margaret Mead, from whom he was later divorced.

Edward Sapir

SapirSapir, EdwardSapir tradition
Before departing for Samoa, Mead had a short affair with the linguist Edward Sapir, a close friend of her instructor Ruth Benedict.
Before departing Canada, Sapir had a short affair with Margaret Mead, Benedict's protégé at Columbia.

Habitat I

UN Habitat IUN Conference on Human SettlementsHabitat, the United Nations Conference on Human Settlements
In 1976, Mead was a key participant at UN Habitat I, the first UN forum on human settlements.

Jean Houston

In later life, Mead was a mentor to many young anthropologists and sociologists, including Jean Houston.
Her interest in anthropology brought about a close association with Margaret Mead, who lived with Houston and Masters for several years before her death in 1978.

New York Academy of Sciences

New York Academy of ScienceThe New York Academy of SciencesLyceum of Natural History
In the 1960s, Mead served as the Vice President of the New York Academy of Sciences.
Prominent members have included two United States Presidents Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe, as well as numerous well-known scientists such as Asa Gray (who served as the Superintendent of the Academy starting in 1836), John James Audubon, Alexander Graham Bell, Thomas Edison, Louis Pasteur, Charles Darwin, and Margaret Mead (who served for a time as the Vice President of the Academy).

Luther Cressman

Luther S. Cressman
After a six-year engagement, she married her first husband (1923–1928) American Luther Cressman, a theology student at the time who eventually became an anthropologist.
Cressman married anthropologist Margaret Mead in 1923; the couple divorced in 1927.

Rhoda Métraux

Rhoda MetrauxRhoda Bubendey MétrauxRhoda Bubendey Metraux
She spent her last years in a close personal and professional collaboration with anthropologist Rhoda Metraux, with whom she lived from 1955 until her death in 1978.
Metraux was also an important professional and personal partner of Margaret Mead (1901–1978).

Leo Rosten

Leonard Q. RossLeo C. Rosten
Elizabeth Mead (1909–1983), an artist and teacher, married cartoonist William Steig, and Priscilla Mead (1911–1959) married author Leo Rosten.
On March 30, 1935, Rosten married Priscilla Ann "Pam" Mead (1911–1959), a fellow graduate student at the University of Chicago and sister of anthropologist Margaret Mead.

Coming of Age in Samoa

Mead-Freeman controversyMead–Freeman controversypublished a book that argued against many of Mead's conclusions.
After her death, Mead's Samoan research was criticized by anthropologist Derek Freeman, who published a book that argued against many of Mead's conclusions. Freeman argued that Mead had misunderstood Samoan culture when she argued that Samoan culture did not place many restrictions on youths' sexual explorations.
Coming of Age in Samoa is a book by American anthropologist Margaret Mead based upon her research and study of youth – primarily adolescent girls – on the island of Ta'u in the Samoan Islands.

Rudolf Modley

In the mid-1960s, Mead joined forces with communications theorist Rudolf Modley, jointly establishing an organization called Glyphs Inc., whose goal was to create a universal graphic symbol language to be understood by any members of culture, no matter how primitive.
In the mid-1960s, Modley joined forces with cultural anthropologist Margaret Mead, jointly establishing an organization called Glyphs Inc., whose goal was to create a universal graphic symbol language to be understood by any members of culture, no matter how primitive.

Chambri people

Chambriinhabitants of the Chambri Lakes
This became a major cornerstone of the feminist movement, since it claimed that females are dominant in the Tchambuli (now spelled Chambri) Lake region of the Sepik basin of Papua New Guinea (in the western Pacific) without causing any special problems.
Margaret Mead, a cultural anthropologist, studied the Chambri in 1933.

75½ Bedford Street

75½ Bedford St75 ½ Bedford Street
Its past tenants have included Edna St. Vincent Millay, Ann McGovern, cartoonist William Steig and anthropologist Margaret Mead.