Marin Mersenne

MersenneMersenne, MarinFather MersenneMarinMarin MersennusPère MersenneTraité de l'harmonie universelle
Marin Mersenne, Marin Mersennus or le Père Mersenne (8 September 1588 – 1 September 1648) was a French polymath, whose works touched a wide variety of fields.wikipedia
275 Related Articles

Acoustics

acousticacousticianacoustical
. He also developed Mersenne's laws, which describe the harmonics of a vibrating string (such as may be found on guitars and pianos), and his seminal work on music theory, Harmonie universelle, for which he is referred to as the "father of acoustics".
Mainly Galileo Galilei (1564–1642) but also Marin Mersenne (1588–1648), independently, discovered the complete laws of vibrating strings (completing what Pythagoras and Pythagoreans had started 2000 years earlier).

Mersenne's laws

known under Mersenne's namelaws of vibrating strings
. He also developed Mersenne's laws, which describe the harmonics of a vibrating string (such as may be found on guitars and pianos), and his seminal work on music theory, Harmonie universelle, for which he is referred to as the "father of acoustics".
The equation was first proposed by French mathematician and music theorist Marin Mersenne in his 1637 work Traité de l'harmonie universelle.

Harmonie universelle

Traité de l'harmonie universelle
. He also developed Mersenne's laws, which describe the harmonics of a vibrating string (such as may be found on guitars and pianos), and his seminal work on music theory, Harmonie universelle, for which he is referred to as the "father of acoustics".
Harmonie universelle (Complete title: Harmonie universelle, contenant la théorie et la pratique de la musique) is the work of Marin Mersenne, published in Paris in 1636.

Sarthe

7272 - SartheLa Sarthe
Mersenne was born of peasant parents near Oizé, Maine (present-day Sarthe, France).
Marin Mersenne, perhaps the most important scientific figure in the early 17th century, was born in the vicinity of Sarthe.

Pierre Petit (engineer)

Pierre PetitPetit, Pierre
There he studied mathematics and music and met with other kindred spirits such as René Descartes, Étienne Pascal, Pierre Petit, Gilles de Roberval, Thomas Hobbes, and Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc.
He was a member of the circle around Marin Mersenne, and knew Etienne Pascal, Blaise Pascal, and René Descartes.

Jacques Alexandre Le Tenneur

He corresponded with Giovanni Doni, Jacques Alexandre Le Tenneur, Constantijn Huygens, Galileo Galilei, and other scholars in Italy, England and the Dutch Republic.
He corresponded with fellow mathematicians such as Pierre Gassendi, Pierre Hérigone and Marin Mersenne.

René Descartes

DescartesCartesianRene Descartes
There he studied mathematics and music and met with other kindred spirits such as René Descartes, Étienne Pascal, Pierre Petit, Gilles de Roberval, Thomas Hobbes, and Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc.
In the fall of the same year, in the residence of the papal nuncio Guidi di Bagno, where he came with Mersenne and many other scholars to listen to a lecture given by the alchemist Nicolas de Villiers, Sieur de Chandoux on the principles of a supposed new philosophy, Cardinal Bérulle urged him to write an exposition of his own new philosophy in some location beyond the reach of the Inquisition.

Thomas Hobbes

HobbesHobbesianHobbes, Thomas
There he studied mathematics and music and met with other kindred spirits such as René Descartes, Étienne Pascal, Pierre Petit, Gilles de Roberval, Thomas Hobbes, and Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc.
He visited Florence in 1636 and was later a regular debater in philosophic groups in Paris, held together by Marin Mersenne.

Blaise Pascal

PascalPascal, BlaisePascalian
Among his correspondents were Descartes, Galileo, Roberval, Pascal, Beeckman and other scientists.
Following Desargues' thinking, the 16-year-old Pascal produced, as a means of proof, a short treatise on what was called the "Mystic Hexagram", Essai pour les coniques ("Essay on Conics") and sent it—his first serious work of mathematics—to Père Mersenne in Paris; it is known still today as Pascal's theorem.

Prytanée National Militaire

Prytanée MilitaireCollège Royal Henry-Le-GrandCollege of La Flèche
He was educated at Le Mans and at the Jesuit College of La Flèche.

Giovanni Battista Doni

DoniG. B. DoniGiovanni Doni
He corresponded with Giovanni Doni, Jacques Alexandre Le Tenneur, Constantijn Huygens, Galileo Galilei, and other scholars in Italy, England and the Dutch Republic.
Doni received the degree of doctor from the University of Pisa and was chosen to accompany Neri Corsini (1614-1678) to Paris in 1621 where he became acquainted with Marin Mersenne and other literary persons.

Minims (religious order)

O.M.MinimMinims
He was also a member of the Minim religious order and wrote and lectured on theology and philosophy.

Pierre Gassendi

GassendiGassendi, PierreGASSENDI, PETER
In 1643–1644 Mersenne also corresponded with the German Socinian Marcin Ruar concerning the Copernican ideas of Pierre Gassendi, finding Ruar already a supporter of Gassendi's position. The cabalist Jacques Gaffarel joined Fludd's side, while Pierre Gassendi defended Mersenne.
During this time he wrote some works, at the insistence of Marin Mersenne.

Pierre de Fermat

FermatPierre FermatFermat, Pierre de
He was not afraid to cause disputes among his learned friends in order to compare their views, notable among which were disputes between Descartes and Pierre de Fermat and Jean de Beaugrand.
It seems that he had not written to Marin Mersenne about it.

Gilles de Roberval

Gilles Personne de RobervalRobervalde Roberval, Gilles
There he studied mathematics and music and met with other kindred spirits such as René Descartes, Étienne Pascal, Pierre Petit, Gilles de Roberval, Thomas Hobbes, and Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc.

Isaac Beeckman

BeeckmanIsaac Beeckman’s
Among his correspondents were Descartes, Galileo, Roberval, Pascal, Beeckman and other scientists.
For example, he had deeply impressed Mersenne, despite their opposing religious views, as well as Gassendi, who apparently had been turned by Beeckman to the philosophy of Epicurus (atomism).

List of Catholic clergy scientists

List of Roman Catholic scientist-clericsList of Jesuit scientistsList of Roman Catholic cleric-scientists
These churchmen-scientists include Nicolaus Copernicus, Gregor Mendel, Georges Lemaître, Albertus Magnus, Roger Bacon, Pierre Gassendi, Roger Joseph Boscovich, Marin Mersenne, Bernard Bolzano, Francesco Maria Grimaldi, Nicole Oresme, Jean Buridan, Robert Grosseteste, Christopher Clavius, Nicolas Steno, Athanasius Kircher, Giovanni Battista Riccioli, William of Ockham, and others listed below.

Marcin Ruar

Martin RuarMartin Ruarus
In 1643–1644 Mersenne also corresponded with the German Socinian Marcin Ruar concerning the Copernican ideas of Pierre Gassendi, finding Ruar already a supporter of Gassendi's position.
In 1643 Marin Mersenne, sought from a J. Fabricius (a student from Gdańsk in Paris, apparently no relation to the astronomer), a Socinian with whom Mersenne could correspond concerning the Copernican heliocentrism of Pierre Gassendi, and was introduced to Ruar.

Seconds pendulum

a pendulum that has a period of 2 secondsone second pendulum
He was the first to measure the length of the seconds pendulum, that is a pendulum whose swing takes one second, and the first to observe that a pendulum's swings are not isochronous as Galileo thought, but that large swings take longer than small swings.
The length of a seconds pendulum was determined (in toises) by Marin Mersenne in 1644.

Equal temperament

equal-temperedequal tempered12-tone equal temperament
: as the ratio for an equally-tempered semitone.
A generation later, French mathematician Marin Mersenne presented several equal tempered

Pendulum

pendulumssimple pendulumpendula
He also performed extensive experiments to determine the acceleration of falling objects by comparing them with the swing of pendulums, reported in his Cogitata Physico-Mathematica in 1644.
Marin Mersenne and René Descartes had discovered around 1636 that the pendulum was not quite isochronous; its period increased somewhat with its amplitude.

Robert Fludd

Fludd, Robert
He also criticises Pico della Mirandola, Cornelius Agrippa, Francesco Giorgio and Robert Fludd, his main target.
Marin Mersenne attacked him in Quæstiones Celebres in Genesim (1623).

Mersenne prime

Mersenne numberMersenne numbersMersenne primes
He is perhaps best known today among mathematicians for Mersenne prime numbers, those which can be written in the form
. They are named after Marin Mersenne, a French Minim friar, who studied them in the early 17th century.

Jacques Gaffarel

Gaffarellus, Jacobus/Jacques Gaffarel
The cabalist Jacques Gaffarel joined Fludd's side, while Pierre Gassendi defended Mersenne.
Gaffarel contributed to the debate between Marin Mersenne and Robert Fludd.

Ancient Airs and Dances

Ancient Airs and Dances for LuteAncient Airs and Dances'' Suite No. 1Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite No. 3
An air attributed to Mersenne was used by Ottorino Respighi in his second suite of Ancient Airs and Dances.