Maritime history of Somalia

Somali city-statesSomali maritime enterpriseSomali maritime historySomali commercial enterprisetradition of trade and commercefleethistory of maritime enterprisehistory of maritime trademaritime enterprisemerchants and seafarers
Maritime history of Somalia refers to the seafaring tradition of the Somali people.wikipedia
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Culture of Somalia

Somali culturecultureCulture of Somaliland
It also covers the historical sea routes taken by Somali sailors which sustained the commercial enterprises of the historical Somali kingdoms and empires, in addition to the contemporary maritime culture of Somalia.
The cultural diffusion of Somali commercial enterprise can be detected in its exotic cuisine, which contains Southeast Asian influences.

Ajuran Sultanate

Ajuran EmpireAjuranAjuran period
In the Middle Ages, several powerful Somali empires dominated the regional trade including the Ajuran Sultanate, the latter of which maintained profitable maritime contacts with Arabia, India, Venetia, Persia, Egypt, Portugal and as far away as China. During the Age of the Ajurans, the sultanates and republics of Merca, Mogadishu, Barawa, Hobyo and their respective ports flourished and had a lucrative foreign commerce with ships sailing to Arabia, India, Venetia, Persia, Egypt, Portugal and as far away as China.
Trading routes dating from the ancient and early medieval periods of Somali maritime enterprise were strengthened or re-established, and foreign trade and commerce in the coastal provinces flourished with ships sailing to and coming from many kingdoms and empires in East Asia, South Asia, Europe, the Near East, North Africa and East Africa.

Berbera

BarberaBarbaraBerbera dockside
This tradition of seaborne trade was maintained in the early modern period, with Berbera being the pre-eminent Somali port during the 18th–19th centuries.
Berbera was part of the classical Somali city-states that engaged in a lucrative trade network connecting Somali merchants with Phoenicia, Ptolemic Egypt, Ancient Greece, Parthian Persia, Saba, Nabataea and the Roman Empire.

Somalis

SomaliSomali peopleSomali clan
Maritime history of Somalia refers to the seafaring tradition of the Somali people.
The cultural diffusion of Somali commercial enterprise can be detected in its cuisine, which contains Southeast Asian influences.

Phoenicia

PhoeniciansPhoenicianPhoenicio
Somali sailors and merchants were the main suppliers of frankincense, myrrh and spices, items which were considered valuable luxuries by the Ancient Egyptians, Phoenicians, Mycenaeans and Babylonians.
In the 2nd millennium BC, the Phoenicians traded with the Somalis.

Mogadishu

Mogadishu, SomaliaMogadiscioMuqdisho
During the Age of the Ajurans, the sultanates and republics of Merca, Mogadishu, Barawa, Hobyo and their respective ports flourished and had a lucrative foreign commerce with ships sailing to Arabia, India, Venetia, Persia, Egypt, Portugal and as far away as China.
Mogadishu was part of the Somali city-states that in engaged in a lucrative trade network connecting Somali merchants with Phoenicia, Ptolemic Egypt, Greece, Parthian Persia, Saba, Nabataea and the Roman Empire.

Mosylon

MossylonMosylon/Bōsāso
During the classical era, several ancient city-states such as Opone, Mosylon and Malao that competed with the Sabaeans, Parthians and Axumites for the wealthy Indo-Greco-Roman trade also flourished in Somalia.

Beden

BadanBadan (ship)
Somali sailors used the ancient Somali maritime vessel known as the beden to transport their cargo.
*Somali maritime history

Kismayo

KismayuKismaayoKisimayo
Kismayo was part of the Somali city-states that in engaged in a lucrative trade network connecting Somali merchants with Phoenicia, Ptolemic Egypt, Greece, Parthian Persia, Saba, Nabataea and the Roman Empire.

Horn of Africa

HornSomali peninsulanortheastern Africa
In antiquity, the ancestors of the Somali people were an important link in the Horn of Africa connecting the region's commerce with the rest of the ancient world.
Trading routes dating from the ancient and early medieval periods of Somali maritime enterprise were also strengthened or re-established, and the state left behind an extensive architectural legacy.

History of Somalia

Campaign of the SultanateshistoryPersecution of the Majeerteen
In the classical period, the Somali city-states of Mosylon, Opone, Malao, Sarapion, Mundus, Essina and Tabae in Somalia developed a lucrative trade network connecting with merchants from Phoenicia, Ptolemic Egypt, Greece, Parthian Persia, Sheba, Nabataea and the Roman Empire.

Somalia

SomaliFederal Republic of SomaliaSOM

Cape Guardafui

FilukCape Guardafui LighthouseGardafuul

Somali architecture

Somalian architectureArchitecture of Somaliaarchitectural legacy

Seamanship

seafaringnauticalMaritime Studies
Maritime history of Somalia refers to the seafaring tradition of the Somali people.

Navigation

nauticalnavigatenavigational
It includes various stages of Somali navigational technology, shipbuilding and design, as well as the history of the Somali port cities.

Shipbuilding

shipbuildershipwrightship building
It includes various stages of Somali navigational technology, shipbuilding and design, as well as the history of the Somali port cities.

Sailor

marinersailorsseaman
It also covers the historical sea routes taken by Somali sailors which sustained the commercial enterprises of the historical Somali kingdoms and empires, in addition to the contemporary maritime culture of Somalia.

Commerce

commercialcommerciallybusiness
In antiquity, the ancestors of the Somali people were an important link in the Horn of Africa connecting the region's commerce with the rest of the ancient world.

Ancient history

antiquityancientancient world
In antiquity, the ancestors of the Somali people were an important link in the Horn of Africa connecting the region's commerce with the rest of the ancient world.

Frankincense

olibanumfrankincenceFrankincense
Somali sailors and merchants were the main suppliers of frankincense, myrrh and spices, items which were considered valuable luxuries by the Ancient Egyptians, Phoenicians, Mycenaeans and Babylonians.

Myrrh

myrhhhealing oilmhyrr
Somali sailors and merchants were the main suppliers of frankincense, myrrh and spices, items which were considered valuable luxuries by the Ancient Egyptians, Phoenicians, Mycenaeans and Babylonians.