Marquis de Sade

Sadede SadeSadeanDonatien Alphonse François, Marquis de SadeThe Marquis de Sade[Marquis] de SadeD.-A.-F.de SadeDer Marquis de SadeDeSadeDonatien Alphonse François de Sade
Donatien Alphonse François, Marquis de Sade (2 June 1740 – 2 December 1814 ), was a French nobleman, revolutionary politician, philosopher, and writer, famous for his libertine sexuality.wikipedia
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Libertine

libertinismlibertineslibertinage
Donatien Alphonse François, Marquis de Sade (2 June 1740 – 2 December 1814 ), was a French nobleman, revolutionary politician, philosopher, and writer, famous for his libertine sexuality. Sade lived a scandalous libertine existence and repeatedly procured young prostitutes as well as employees of both sexes in his castle in Lacoste.
Notable among these were John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester and the Marquis de Sade.

Madelonnettes Convent

prison des MadelonnettesMadelonnettes
Sade was incarcerated in various prisons and an insane asylum for about 32 years of his life: 11 years in Paris (10 of which were spent in the Bastille), a month in the Conciergerie, two years in a fortress, a year in Madelonnettes Convent, three years in Bicêtre Asylum, a year in Sainte-Pélagie Prison, and 12 years in the Charenton Asylum.
As the Madelonnettes Prison (prison des Madelonnettes) during the French Revolution, its prisoners included the writers the Marquis de Sade and Nicolas Chamfort, the politician Jean-Baptiste de Machault d'Arnouville and the actor Dazincourt.

The 120 Days of Sodom

120 Days of SodomLes 120 journées de Sodome ou l'école du libertinageDuke
There have also been numerous film adaptions of his work, the most notable being Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom, an adaptation of his infamous book, The 120 Days of Sodom.
The 120 Days of Sodom, or the School of Libertinage (Les 120 Journées de Sodome ou l'école du libertinage) is a novel by the French writer and nobleman Donatien Alphonse François, Marquis de Sade.

Sadomasochism

S&Msadisticsadomasochistic
The words sadism and sadist are derived from his name.
The term "Sadism" has its origin in the name of the Marquis de Sade (1740–1814), who not only practiced sexual sadism, but also wrote novels about these practices, of which the best known is Justine.

Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom

Salò o le 120 giornate di SodomaSaloSalò
There have also been numerous film adaptions of his work, the most notable being Salò, or the 120 Days of Sodom, an adaptation of his infamous book, The 120 Days of Sodom.
The film is a loose adaptation of the book The 120 Days of Sodom by the Marquis de Sade reset during WWII.

Lycée Louis-le-Grand

Louis-le-GrandCollège Louis-le-GrandCollège de Clermont
Later in his childhood, Sade was sent to the Lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris, a Jesuit college, for four years.
Indeed, former students have included writers Molière, Victor Hugo and Charles Baudelaire, revolutionaries Robespierre, the Marquis de Sade and Camille Desmoulins, as well as seven former presidents of the French Republic and countless other ministers and prime ministers, philosophers such as Voltaire, Diderot, Emile Durkheim, Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Cavaillès and Jacques Derrida, scientists Évariste Galois, Henri Poincaré and Laurent Schwartz, and artists Eugène Delacroix, Edgar Degas and Georges Méliès.

Erotic literature

eroticerotic novelerotic fiction
Sade is best known for his erotic works, which combined philosophical discourse with pornography, depicting sexual fantasies with an emphasis on violence, suffering, criminality, and blasphemy against Christianity.
In the late 18th century, such works as Justine, or the Misfortunes of Virtue and 120 Days of Sodom by the Marquis de Sade were exemplars of the theme of sado-masochism and influenced later erotic accounts of Sadism and masochism in fiction.

Sainte-Pélagie Prison

Sainte-Pélagieprison Sainte-Pélagieprison de Sainte-Pélagie
Sade was incarcerated in various prisons and an insane asylum for about 32 years of his life: 11 years in Paris (10 of which were spent in the Bastille), a month in the Conciergerie, two years in a fortress, a year in Madelonnettes Convent, three years in Bicêtre Asylum, a year in Sainte-Pélagie Prison, and 12 years in the Charenton Asylum.
After the revolution, the Marquis de Sade was imprisoned here, as was the young mathematician Évariste Galois.

Charenton (asylum)

CharentonCharenton Asylumasylum at Charenton
Sade was incarcerated in various prisons and an insane asylum for about 32 years of his life: 11 years in Paris (10 of which were spent in the Bastille), a month in the Conciergerie, two years in a fortress, a year in Madelonnettes Convent, three years in Bicêtre Asylum, a year in Sainte-Pélagie Prison, and 12 years in the Charenton Asylum.
In 1804, after Marquis de Sade was transferred from the Bastille, director François Simonnet de Coulmier, a Catholic priest, employed the use of psycho-drama therapy by allowing patients to organize and act in their own plays.

Justine (de Sade novel)

Justinebook of the same nameJustine ou Les Malheurs de la vertu
In 1801, Napoleon Bonaparte ordered the arrest of the anonymous author of Justine and Juliette.
Justine, or The Misfortunes of Virtue (French: Justine, ou Les Malheurs de la Vertu) is a 1791 novel by Donatien Alphonse François de Sade, better known as the Marquis de Sade.

Juliette (novel)

JulietteJuliette'' (novel)Juliette, or Vice Amply Rewarded
In 1801, Napoleon Bonaparte ordered the arrest of the anonymous author of Justine and Juliette.
Juliette is a novel written by the Marquis de Sade and published 1797–1801, accompanying Sade's Nouvelle Justine.

Michel Foucault

FoucaultFoucauldianstate racism
Prolific French intellectuals such as Roland Barthes, Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida and Michel Foucault published studies of him.
The couple took a mutual interest in the work of such authors as the Marquis de Sade, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Franz Kafka and Jean Genet, all of whose works explored the themes of sex and violence.

Lacoste, Vaucluse

LacosteLacoste FestivalLacoste, France
Sade lived a scandalous libertine existence and repeatedly procured young prostitutes as well as employees of both sexes in his castle in Lacoste.
Lacoste is best known for its most notorious resident, Donatien Alphonse Francois comte de Sade, the Marquis de Sade, who in the 18th century lived in the castle, Château de Lacoste, overlooking the village.

Honoré Gabriel Riqueti, comte de Mirabeau

MirabeauComte de MirabeauHonoré Mirabeau
He resumed writing and met fellow prisoner Comte de Mirabeau, who also wrote erotic works.
The early part of his confinement is marked by indecent letters to Sophie (first published in 1793), and the obscene Erotica biblion and Ma conversion In Vincennes, he met the Marquis de Sade, who was also writing erotic works; however the two disliked each other intensely.

Bastille

The BastilleBastille in ParisBastille prison
Sade was incarcerated in various prisons and an insane asylum for about 32 years of his life: 11 years in Paris (10 of which were spent in the Bastille), a month in the Conciergerie, two years in a fortress, a year in Madelonnettes Convent, three years in Bicêtre Asylum, a year in Sainte-Pélagie Prison, and 12 years in the Charenton Asylum.
The Marquis de Sade, for example, arrived with an elaborate wardrobe, paintings, tapestries, a selection of perfume, and a collection of 133 books.

Château de Lacoste

Henry de Simiane de LacosteLacoste
In 1766, he had a private theatre built in his castle, the Château de Lacoste, in Provence.
In 1627, Diane Simiane married Jean-Baptiste de Sade, ancestor of the Marquis de Sade, who thus became owner of the estate.

Philosophy in the Bedroom

EugeniePhilosophy in the BoudoirXXX
In his 1988 Political Theory and Modernity, William E. Connolly analyzes Sade's Philosophy in the Bedroom as an argument against earlier political philosophers, notably Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Thomas Hobbes, and their attempts to reconcile nature, reason, and virtue as bases of ordered society.
Philosophy in the Boudoir (La philosophie dans le boudoir) is a 1795 book by the Marquis de Sade written in the form of a dramatic dialogue.

Lettre de cachet

lettres de cachetlettres de cachets
La Présidente, Sade's mother-in-law, obtained a lettre de cachet (a royal order of arrest and imprisonment, without stated cause or access to the courts) from the King, protecting Sade from the jurisdiction of the courts.
The case of the Marquis de Sade (imprisoned 1777–1790 under a lettre de cachet obtained by his wealthy and influential mother-in-law) is a prominent example.

Cantharidin

cantharidesSpanish Flycantharide
That episode in Marseille involved the non-lethal incapacitating of prostitutes with the supposed aphrodisiac Spanish fly and sodomy with Latour.
The French writer Marquis de Sade (1740–1814) is said to have given aniseed-flavored pastilles laced with spanish fly to two prostitutes at an orgy in 1772, poisoning and nearly killing them. He was sentenced to death for that (and for the crime of sodomy), but was later reprieved on appeal.

Hôtel de Condé

hôtel
Donatien Alphonse François de Sade was born on 2 June 1740, in the Hôtel de Condé, Paris, to Jean Baptiste François Joseph, Count de Sade and Marie Eléonore de Maillé de Carman, distant cousin and Lady-in-waiting to the Princess of Condé.
Here, where his mother Marie Éléonore de Maillé de Carman had a suite of rooms, in her place as lady companion to the Princess de Condé, was born the Marquis de Sade.

Bicêtre Hospital

BicêtreLa Bicêtreasylum
Sade was incarcerated in various prisons and an insane asylum for about 32 years of his life: 11 years in Paris (10 of which were spent in the Bastille), a month in the Conciergerie, two years in a fortress, a year in Madelonnettes Convent, three years in Bicêtre Asylum, a year in Sainte-Pélagie Prison, and 12 years in the Charenton Asylum.
Its most notorious guest was the Marquis de Sade.

Château de Vincennes

VincennesChâteau and the Chapelchâteau of Vincennes
He was arrested and imprisoned in the Château de Vincennes.
Abandoned in the 18th century, the château still served, first as the site of the Vincennes porcelain manufactory, the precursor to Sèvres, then as a state prison, which housed the marquis de Sade, Diderot, Mirabeau, and the famous confidence man, Jean Henri Latude, as well as a community of nuns of the English Benedictine Congregation from Cambrai.

Landgravine Caroline of Hesse-Rotenburg

Caroline of Hesse-RotenburgCarolineCaroline of Hesse
Donatien Alphonse François de Sade was born on 2 June 1740, in the Hôtel de Condé, Paris, to Jean Baptiste François Joseph, Count de Sade and Marie Eléonore de Maillé de Carman, distant cousin and Lady-in-waiting to the Princess of Condé.
Her husband died at the Château de Chantilly on 27 January 1740, in the same year the future Marquis de Sade was born at the Hôtel de Condé; his mother was Caroline's lady in waiting.

Pierre Klossowski

KlossowskiKlossowski, Pierre
Pierre Klossowski, in his 1947 book Sade Mon Prochain ("Sade My Neighbour"), analyzes Sade's philosophy as a precursor of nihilism, negating Christian values and the materialism of the Enlightenment.
Pierre Klossowski wrote full length volumes on the Marquis de Sade and Friedrich Nietzsche, a number of essays on literary and philosophical figures, and five novels.

Nicolas-Edme Rétif

Restif de la BretonneRétif de la BretonneNicolas-Edmé Restif de la Bretonne
The contemporary rival pornographer Rétif de la Bretonne published an Anti-Justine in 1798.
He and the Marquis de Sade maintained a mutual hate, while he was appreciated by Benjamin Constant and Friedrich von Schiller and appeared at the table of Alexandre Balthazar Laurent Grimod de La Reynière, whom he met in 1782.