Martin Barooshian

Martin Barooshian (born 1929, Chelsea, Massachusetts) is an American painter and printmaker.wikipedia
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Society of American Graphic Artists

Society of American EtchersSociety of American Graphic Artists (SAGA)Brooklyn Society of Etchers
Barooshian served as president of the Society of American Graphic Artists and the vice president of the U.S. Committee of the International Association of Art for the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).
Shelley Thorstensen, Gerald Marcus, Linda Adato, Richard Sloat, William Behnken, Martin Levine, Michael DiCerbo, Dan Welden, Steven Yamin, Robert Broner, Gerson Leiber, Stanley Kaplan, Anne Steele Marsh, Martin Barooshian, David Shapiro, Clare Romano, Chaim Koppelman, John Ross, Gladys Mock, Carl M. Schulteiss, Lynd Ward, Frederick T. Weber, George O. "Pop" Hart, John Taylor Arms, Eugene Higgins, Ernest D.

Chelsea, Massachusetts

ChelseaChelsea, MAChelsea (city)
Martin Barooshian (born 1929, Chelsea, Massachusetts) is an American painter and printmaker. Barooshian was born in Chelsea, Massachusetts as the first of three children to Armenian immigrant parents, survivors of the Armenian Genocide.

Surrealism

surrealistsurrealSurrealists
His work frequently dances the line of Surrealism and Expressionism, often with a pop and op art edge, incorporating aspects of primitive, Romantic, and Renaissance art.

Expressionism

expressionistexpressionisticExpressionists
His work frequently dances the line of Surrealism and Expressionism, often with a pop and op art edge, incorporating aspects of primitive, Romantic, and Renaissance art.

Pop art

Poppop-artpop artist
His work frequently dances the line of Surrealism and Expressionism, often with a pop and op art edge, incorporating aspects of primitive, Romantic, and Renaissance art.

Op art

op-artThe Responsive Eyeoptical art
His work frequently dances the line of Surrealism and Expressionism, often with a pop and op art edge, incorporating aspects of primitive, Romantic, and Renaissance art.

Romanticism

RomanticRomantic movementRomantic era
His work frequently dances the line of Surrealism and Expressionism, often with a pop and op art edge, incorporating aspects of primitive, Romantic, and Renaissance art.

Renaissance art

RenaissanceRenaissance paintingEarly Renaissance painting
His work frequently dances the line of Surrealism and Expressionism, often with a pop and op art edge, incorporating aspects of primitive, Romantic, and Renaissance art.

Printmaking

printmakerprintsprint
These have included woodcuts, lithographs, etchings and engravings with aquatint and soft ground, monotypes, gouache and watercolor paintings, and oils.

Monotyping

monotypemonotypesmonotypic
These have included woodcuts, lithographs, etchings and engravings with aquatint and soft ground, monotypes, gouache and watercolor paintings, and oils.

Biomorphism

biomorphicbiomorphsabstract biomorphic
However, Barooshian defines himself as a Biomorphic Abstract Surrealist after his first personal artistic breakthrough and mature style.

The Boston Globe

Boston GlobeBoston Daily GlobeThe Boston Daily Globe
Cate McQuaid--art critic for The Boston Globe--dubbed Barooshian’s biomorphic surrealist style as “Pablo Picasso meets Stan Lee,” recognizing the blend of the modern with the contemporary.

Pablo Picasso

PicassoPablo Ruiz PicassoPicassos
Cate McQuaid--art critic for The Boston Globe--dubbed Barooshian’s biomorphic surrealist style as “Pablo Picasso meets Stan Lee,” recognizing the blend of the modern with the contemporary.

Stan Lee

Stan [LeeLeeOrigins of Marvel Comics
Cate McQuaid--art critic for The Boston Globe--dubbed Barooshian’s biomorphic surrealist style as “Pablo Picasso meets Stan Lee,” recognizing the blend of the modern with the contemporary.

Addison Gallery of American Art

Addison Gallery
Susan Faxon, Associate Director and Curator of the Addison Gallery of American Art, summed up her experience of reviewing Barooshian’s oeuvre: “It was clear that [Barooshian] had devoted a lifetime to the making of art and that he was still fully engaged on a daily basis in the creative process. His work is in the permanent collection of many important museums around the globe including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the National Gallery of Art, and the Addison Gallery of American Art.

Metropolitan Museum of Art

The Metropolitan Museum of ArtMetropolitan MuseumNew York Metropolitan Museum of Art
His work is in the permanent collection of many important museums around the globe including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the National Gallery of Art, and the Addison Gallery of American Art.

Museum of Modern Art

MoMAThe Museum of Modern ArtMuseum of Modern Art, New York
His work is in the permanent collection of many important museums around the globe including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the National Gallery of Art, and the Addison Gallery of American Art.

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Museum of Fine ArtsBoston Museum of Fine ArtsMuseum of Fine Arts Boston
His work is in the permanent collection of many important museums around the globe including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the National Gallery of Art, and the Addison Gallery of American Art.

National Gallery of Art

The National Gallery of ArtNational GalleryNational Gallery of Art, Washington
His work is in the permanent collection of many important museums around the globe including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the National Gallery of Art, and the Addison Gallery of American Art.

National Academy of Design

National Academy Museum and SchoolNational AcademyNational Academy Museum
He has won several awards including the Albert H. Whitin Traveling Fellowship, the Print Prize from the National Academy of Design, and the Dorothy Lathrop Award from the Print Club of Albany.

Armenian Genocide

ArmeniangenocideArmenians
Barooshian was born in Chelsea, Massachusetts as the first of three children to Armenian immigrant parents, survivors of the Armenian Genocide.

School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts

School of the Museum of Fine Arts, BostonSchool of the Museum of Fine ArtsBoston Museum School
Barooshian studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (SMFA) with Karl Zerbe, Ture Bengtz, and Richard C. Bartlett.

Karl Zerbe

Barooshian studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (SMFA) with Karl Zerbe, Ture Bengtz, and Richard C. Bartlett.

Ture Bengtz

Barooshian studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (SMFA) with Karl Zerbe, Ture Bengtz, and Richard C. Bartlett.

Stanley William Hayter

Atelier 17Stanley HayterS. W. Hayter
Perhaps the greatest influence on Barooshian’s development was the time he spent in the early-1950s with Stanley William Hayter at his famed etching and engraving studio Atelier 17 in Paris.