Martin Chemnitz

ChemnitzChemnitz, MartinM. Chemnitz
Martin Chemnitz (9 November 1522 – 8 April 1586) was an eminent second-generation German, Evangelical Lutheran, Christian theologian, and a Protestant reformer, churchman, and confessor.wikipedia
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Protestant Reformers

Protestant reformerreformerReformers
Martin Chemnitz (9 November 1522 – 8 April 1586) was an eminent second-generation German, Evangelical Lutheran, Christian theologian, and a Protestant reformer, churchman, and confessor.

Calendar of saints (Lutheran)

Calendar of SaintsLutheran Calendar of SaintsLutheran
He is listed and remembered in the Calendar of Saints and Commemorations in the Liturgical Church Year as a pastor and confessor in the Lutheran Book of Worship (1978) and subsequent Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2005) used by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

Treuenbrietzen

Treuenbrietzen massacre
Chemnitz, born in Treuenbrietzen in Brandenburg to Paul and Euphemia Chemnitz, was the last of three children.

Königsberg State and University Library

royal and university librariesRoyal and University LibraryCastle Library
When he judged it safe, Chemnitz returned to Königsberg in 1550, now employed by Albert, Duke of Prussia, as the court librarian for the Konigsberg State and University Library.
The immediate successors of Polyphemus were Martin Chemnitz of Treuenbrietzen (worked 1550-53) and David Milesius of Neisse.

Philip Melanchthon

Philipp MelanchthonMelanchthonMelancthon
In 1545 Chemnitz accompanied his cousin Georg Sabinus to school at the University of Wittenberg in Wittenberg, Germany (1545–1547), where he studied under Martin Luther (1483-1546) and Philip Melanchthon (1497-1560).
Loci communes began the gradual rise of the Lutheran scholastic tradition, and the later theologians Martin Chemnitz, Mathias Haffenreffer, and Leonhard Hutter expanded upon it.

Lutheran scholasticism

Lutheran scholasticLutheran scholasticsLutheran
This early method of Lutheran scholastic self-study had been suggested by Melanchthon in his Writings (cf.
Martin Chemnitz, Mathias Haffenreffer, and Leonhard Hutter simply expanded upon Melanchthon's Loci Communes.

Lutheranism

LutheranEvangelical LutheranLutherans
Martin Chemnitz (9 November 1522 – 8 April 1586) was an eminent second-generation German, Evangelical Lutheran, Christian theologian, and a Protestant reformer, churchman, and confessor. He was instrumental in the publication of the definitive Book of Concord: Confessions of the Evangelical Lutheran Church presented in 1580, containing a series of important earlier confessional theological documents, treatises, commentaries, catechisms as the compilation of the doctrinal standard of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.
Other orthodox Lutheran theologians include Martin Chemnitz, Aegidius Hunnius, Leonhard Hutter, Nicolaus Hunnius, Jesper Rasmussen Brochmand, Salomo Glassius, Johann Hülsemann, Johann Conrad Dannhauer, Johannes Andreas Quenstedt, Johann Friedrich König, and Johann Wilhelm Baier.

Nikolaus Selnecker

Nicholas SelneckerSelnecker
With Jakob Andreae, David Chytraeus, Nicholas Selnecker, Andrew Musculus and others, Chemnitz took part in a centrist movement that brought agreement among German Lutherans in the writing and publication of the Formula of Concord (1577), of which Chemnitz is one of the primary authors.
He is also known as one of the principal authors of the Formula of Concord along with Jakob Andreä and Martin Chemnitz.

Lutheran orthodoxy

orthodox Lutheranorthodoxyorthodox
These works demonstrate Martin Chemnitz's abilities as a biblical, doctrinal and historical theologian in the orthodox Lutheran tradition.
Other orthodox Lutheran theologians include (for example) Martin Chemnitz, Aegidius Hunnius, Leonhard Hutter (1563-1616), Nicolaus Hunnius, Jesper Rasmussen Brochmand, Salomo Glassius, Johann Hülsemann, Johann Conrad Dannhauer, Valerius Herberger, Johannes Andreas Quenstedt, Johann Friedrich König and Johann Wilhelm Baier.

Book of Concord

Lutheran ConfessionsThe Book of ConcordBook of Concord: Confessions of the Evangelical Lutheran Church
He was instrumental in the publication of the definitive Book of Concord: Confessions of the Evangelical Lutheran Church presented in 1580, containing a series of important earlier confessional theological documents, treatises, commentaries, catechisms as the compilation of the doctrinal standard of the Evangelical Lutheran Church.
The Book of Concord was compiled by a group of theologians led by Jakob Andreae and Martin Chemnitz at the behest of their rulers, who desired an end to the religious controversies in their territories that arose among Lutherans after the death of Martin Luther in 1546.

Formula of Concord

Epitome of the Formula of Concordformula concordiaeFormulas of Concord
With Jakob Andreae, David Chytraeus, Nicholas Selnecker, Andrew Musculus and others, Chemnitz took part in a centrist movement that brought agreement among German Lutherans in the writing and publication of the Formula of Concord (1577), of which Chemnitz is one of the primary authors.
They were Jakob Andreä (1528–90), Martin Chemnitz (1522–86), Nikolaus Selnecker (1528–92), David Chytraeus (1531–1600), Andreas Musculus (1514–81), Christoph Körner (1518–94), Caspar Heyderich (1517–86), Paul Crell (1532–79), Maximilian Mörlin (1516–84), Wolfgang Harder (1522–1602), Daniel Gräser, Nicholas Jagenteufel (1520–83), Johannes Cornicaelius, John Schütz (1531–84), Martin Mirus (1532–93), Georg Listenius (d.

Reformation

Protestant Reformationthe ReformationProtestant
The 1530 Augsburg Confession concluded that "in doctrine and ceremonies nothing has been received on our part against Scripture or the Church Catholic", and even after the Council of Trent, Martin Chemnitz published the 1565–73 Examination of the Council of Trent as an attempt to prove that Trent innovated on doctrine while the Lutherans were following in the footsteps of the Church Fathers and Apostles.

Joachim Mörlin

He was ordained to the ministry on 26 November 1554 by Johannes Bugenhagen (1485-1558), and became co-adjutor of Joachim Mörlin (1514-1571), who was ecclesiastical superintendent for the Duchy of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel.
In the following year he received an assistant in the Melanchthonian Martin Chemnitz, and developed a powerful activity, strengthening the Lutheran cause with the aid of the religious peace of Augsburg, and preparing, in 1577, his Leges pro ministerio Brunsvicensi, which all the clergy of his superintendency were required to subscribe when entering upon office.

Examination of the Council of Trent

Examen Concilii Tridentini
Other major works are Examen Concilii Tridentini (Examination of the Council of Trent) and De Duabis Naturis in Christo (On the Two Natures in Christ).
Examination of the Council of Trent (Latin: Examen Concilii Tridentini, 1565–73) is a large theological work of Lutheran Reformer Martin Chemnitz.

Jakob Andreae

Jacob AndreaeJakob AndreäJakob Andrea
With Jakob Andreae, David Chytraeus, Nicholas Selnecker, Andrew Musculus and others, Chemnitz took part in a centrist movement that brought agreement among German Lutherans in the writing and publication of the Formula of Concord (1577), of which Chemnitz is one of the primary authors.
He was a signatory of the 1577 Formula of Concord, and editor with Martin Chemnitz of the 1580 Book of Concord.

J. A. O. Preus II

J. A. O. PreusJacob Aall Ottesen Preus IIJ.A.O. Preus II
Preus was known as a scholar of the Orthodoxy period of Lutheran history, especially of Lutheran Protestant theologian Martin Chemnitz (1522-1586).

German Confederation

GermanyGermanGerman states
Martin Chemnitz (9 November 1522 – 8 April 1586) was an eminent second-generation German, Evangelical Lutheran, Christian theologian, and a Protestant reformer, churchman, and confessor.

Christian theology

Christian doctrineChristian theologiantheology
Martin Chemnitz (9 November 1522 – 8 April 1586) was an eminent second-generation German, Evangelical Lutheran, Christian theologian, and a Protestant reformer, churchman, and confessor.

Martin Luther

LutherLutheranLuther, Martin
In 1545 Chemnitz accompanied his cousin Georg Sabinus to school at the University of Wittenberg in Wittenberg, Germany (1545–1547), where he studied under Martin Luther (1483-1546) and Philip Melanchthon (1497-1560). In the Evangelical Lutheran tradition he is known as Alter Martinus, the "Second Martin": Si Martinus non fuisset, Martinus vix stetisset ("If Martin [Chemnitz] had not come along, Luther would hardly have survived") goes a common saying concerning him.

Lutheran Book of Worship

joint hymnalLBWLutheran Book of Worship Occasional Service Book
He is listed and remembered in the Calendar of Saints and Commemorations in the Liturgical Church Year as a pastor and confessor in the Lutheran Book of Worship (1978) and subsequent Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2005) used by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

Evangelical Lutheran Worship

He is listed and remembered in the Calendar of Saints and Commemorations in the Liturgical Church Year as a pastor and confessor in the Lutheran Book of Worship (1978) and subsequent Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2005) used by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

ELCALutheranEvangelical Lutheran Church of America
He is listed and remembered in the Calendar of Saints and Commemorations in the Liturgical Church Year as a pastor and confessor in the Lutheran Book of Worship (1978) and subsequent Evangelical Lutheran Worship (2005) used by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America.

Margraviate of Brandenburg

BrandenburgElectorate of BrandenburgMarch of Brandenburg
Chemnitz, born in Treuenbrietzen in Brandenburg to Paul and Euphemia Chemnitz, was the last of three children.

Magdeburg

Magdeburg, GermanyLangenweddingenSalbke
When he was old enough, Martin matriculated in Magdeburg.

Weaving

weaverweaverswoven
Upon completion of the course work, he became a weaver's apprentice.