Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King, Jr.Martin Luther KingDr. Martin Luther King, Jr.Martin Luther King JrDr. Martin Luther King Jr.Martin Luther King, JrDr. Martin Luther KingDr. KingKingDr. Martin Luther King, Jr
Martin Luther King Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American Christian minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the Civil Rights Movement from 1955 until his assassination in 1968.wikipedia
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Southern Christian Leadership Conference

SCLCSouthern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC)Southern Christian Leadership Council
King led the 1955 Montgomery bus boycott and in 1957 became the first president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC).
SCLC, which is closely associated with its first president, Martin Luther King Jr., had a large role in the American civil rights movement.

Georgia (U.S. state)

GeorgiaGAState of Georgia
Born in Atlanta, Georgia, King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, inspired by his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi.
During the 20th century, several Georgians, most notably Martin Luther King, Jr., were prominent leaders during the civil rights movement.

Nonviolence

nonviolentnon-violencenon-violent
Born in Atlanta, Georgia, King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, inspired by his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi.
Here certain movements particularly influenced by a philosophy of nonviolence should be mentioned, including Mahatma Gandhi leading a successful decades-long nonviolent struggle against British rule in India, Martin Luther King's and James Bevel's adoption of Gandhi's nonviolent methods in their campaigns to win civil rights for African Americans, and César Chávez's campaigns of nonviolence in the 1960s to protest the treatment of farm workers in California.

I Have a Dream

I Have a Dream" speechDreamI Have a Dream Speech
He helped organize the 1963 March on Washington, where he delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech.
"I Have a Dream" is a public speech that was delivered by American civil rights activist Martin Luther King Jr. during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963, in which he called for civil and economic rights and an end to racism in the United States.

Civil rights movement

American Civil Rights Movementcivil rightscivil rights era
Martin Luther King Jr. (January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American Christian minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the Civil Rights Movement from 1955 until his assassination in 1968.
Many popular representations of the movement are centered on the charismatic leadership and philosophy of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., who won the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolent resistance.

Civil disobedience

disobedienceNon Cooperation MovementCivil Disobedience Movement
Born in Atlanta, Georgia, King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, inspired by his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi.
It has inspired Mahatma Gandhi in his protests for Indian independence against the British Raj; and Martin Luther King Jr.'s peaceful protests during the civil rights movement in the US.

Nonviolent resistance

passive resistancenon-violent resistancepeaceful protest
On October 14, 1964, King won the Nobel Peace Prize for combating racial inequality through nonviolent resistance.
Major nonviolent resistance advocates include Mahatma Gandhi, Henry David Thoreau, Te Whiti o Rongomai, Tohu Kākahi, Leo Tolstoy, Alice Paul, Martin Luther King, Jr, Daniel Berrigan, Philip Berrigan, James Bevel, Václav Havel, Andrei Sakharov, Lech Wałęsa, Gene Sharp, Nelson Mandela, and many others.

Assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.

assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.assassinationassassinated
In 1968, King was planning a national occupation of Washington, D.C., to be called the Poor People's Campaign, when he was assassinated on April 4 in Memphis, Tennessee.
Martin Luther King Jr., an American clergyman and civil rights leader, was fatally shot at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee, on April 4, 1968, at 6:01 p.m. CST.

Poor People's Campaign

Poor People's March on WashingtonPoor People's MarchResurrection City
In 1968, King was planning a national occupation of Washington, D.C., to be called the Poor People's Campaign, when he was assassinated on April 4 in Memphis, Tennessee.
It was organized by Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), and carried out under the leadership of Ralph Abernathy in the wake of King's assassination.

Selma to Montgomery marches

Bloody SundaySelma to Montgomery marchSelma Voting Rights Movement
In 1965, he helped organize the Selma to Montgomery marches.
Finding resistance by white officials to be intractable, even after the Civil Rights Act of 1964 ended legal segregation, the DCVL invited Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the activists of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) to join them.

James Earl Ray

a white racistan assassinMartin Luther King's murderer
Allegations that James Earl Ray, the man convicted of killing King, had been framed or acted in concert with government agents persisted for decades after the shooting.
James Earl Ray (March 10, 1928 – April 23, 1998) was an American fugitive and felon convicted of assassinating Martin Luther King Jr. at the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee on April 4, 1968.

List of streets named after Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. BoulevardMartin Luther King, Jr. BoulevardMartin Luther King Jr. Drive
Hundreds of streets in the U.S. have been renamed in his honor, and a county in Washington was rededicated for him.
There are also a number of other countries that have honored Martin Luther King Jr., including Italy and Israel.

COINTELPRO

Counter-Intelligence ProgramCOINTELCointelpro Program
J. Edgar Hoover considered him a radical and made him an object of the FBI's COINTELPRO from 1963 on.
FBI records show that COINTELPRO resources targeted groups and individuals that the FBI deemed subversive, including feminist organizations, the Communist Party USA, anti–Vietnam War organizers, activists of the civil rights movement or Black Power movement (e.g. Martin Luther King Jr., the Nation of Islam, and the Black Panther Party), environmentalist and animal rights organizations, the American Indian Movement (AIM), independence movements (such as Puerto Rican independence groups like the Young Lords), and a variety of organizations that were part of the broader New Left.

Memphis, Tennessee

MemphisMemphis, TNMemphis Tennessee
In 1968, King was planning a national occupation of Washington, D.C., to be called the Poor People's Campaign, when he was assassinated on April 4 in Memphis, Tennessee.
Home to Tennessee's largest African-American population, Memphis played a prominent role in the American civil rights movement and was the site of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 1968 assassination.

Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Martin Luther King, Jr. DayMartin Luther King DayMLK Day of service
Martin Luther King Jr. Day was established as a holiday in numerous cities and states beginning in 1971; the holiday was enacted at the federal level by legislation signed by President Ronald Reagan in 1986.
Martin Luther King Jr. Day (officially Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr., and sometimes referred to as MLK Day) is an American federal holiday marking the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. It is observed on the third Monday of January each year, which is around King's birthday, January 15.

FBI–King suicide letter

a threatening anonymous letteran insulting, anonymous letteranonymous blackmail letter
FBI agents investigated him for possible communist ties, recorded his extramarital liaisons and reported on them to government officials, and on one occasion mailed King a threatening anonymous letter, which he interpreted as an attempt to make him commit suicide.
The FBI–King suicide letter or blackmail package was an anonymous 1964 letter and package by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) meant to blackmail Martin Luther King Jr. The phrase "You are done" is a noted warning from the letter.

Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence

Beyond VietnamA Time to Break SilenceRiverside Church speech
He alienated many of his liberal allies with a 1967 speech titled "Beyond Vietnam".
"Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence", also referred as the Riverside Church speech, is an anti–Vietnam War and pro–social justice speech delivered by Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4, 1967, exactly one year before he was assassinated.

Birmingham, Alabama

BirminghamBirmingham, ALPratt City
With the SCLC, he led an unsuccessful 1962 struggle against segregation in Albany, Georgia, and helped organize the nonviolent 1963 protests in Birmingham, Alabama.
A watershed in the civil rights movement occurred in 1963 when Shuttlesworth requested Martin Luther King Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC), which Shuttlesworth had co-founded, come to Birmingham to help end public segregation.

Albany Movement

Slater King1962 struggle against segregationAlbany
With the SCLC, he led an unsuccessful 1962 struggle against segregation in Albany, Georgia, and helped organize the nonviolent 1963 protests in Birmingham, Alabama.
In December 1961, at the request of some senior leaders of The Albany Movement, Martin Luther King Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) became involved in assisting the Albany group with organizing protests and demonstrations meant to draw attention to the continued and often brutally enforced racial segregation practices in Southwest Georgia.

Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial

Martin Luther King, Jr. MemorialMartin Luther King, Jr. National MemorialMartin Luther King Jr. National Memorial
The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., was dedicated in 2011.
It covers four acres and includes the Stone of Hope, a granite statue of Civil Rights Movement leader Martin Luther King carved by sculptor Lei Yixin.

Atlanta

Atlanta, GeorgiaAtlanta, GAAtlanta, United States
Born in Atlanta, Georgia, King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, inspired by his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi. King was born on January 15, 1929, in Atlanta, Georgia, to the Reverend Martin Luther King Sr. and Alberta Williams King.
During the 1950s and 1960s, Atlanta became a major organizing center of the civil rights movement, with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Ralph David Abernathy, and many other locals playing major roles in the movement's leadership.

Alberta Williams King

Alberta Christine Williams KingMarcus Wayne ChenaultAlberta
King was born on January 15, 1929, in Atlanta, Georgia, to the Reverend Martin Luther King Sr. and Alberta Williams King.
Alberta Christine Williams King (September 13, 1904 – June 30, 1974) was Martin Luther King, Jr.'s mother and the wife of Martin Luther King, Sr. She played a significant role in the affairs of the Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Chicago

Chicago, IllinoisChicago, ILCity of Chicago
The following year, he and the SCLC took the movement north to Chicago to work on segregated housing.
In 1966, Martin Luther King Jr. and Albert Raby led the Chicago Freedom Movement, which culminated in agreements between Mayor Richard J. Daley and the movement leaders.

King County, Washington

King CountyKingWashington
Hundreds of streets in the U.S. have been renamed in his honor, and a county in Washington was rededicated for him.
On February 24, 1986, a motion to change the namesake to Martin Luther King Jr. was passed by the King County Council five votes to four.

Christine King Farris

Christine King FerrisWillie Christine KingChristine King
King was a middle child, between older sister Christine King Farris and younger brother A.D. King.
Willie Christine King Farris (née King; born September 11, 1927) is the eldest and only living sibling of Martin Luther King Jr. She taught at Spelman College and is the author of several books and a public speaker on various topics, including the King family, multicultural education, and teaching.