Martin P4M Mercator

P4M-1Q MercatorMartin P4M-1Q MercatorP-4M-1Q MercatorP4M aircraftP4M MercatorP4M-1 MercatorP4M-1Q
The Martin P4M Mercator was a maritime reconnaissance aircraft built by the Glenn L. Martin Company.wikipedia
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Glenn L. Martin Company

MartinMartin CompanyGlenn L. Martin Aircraft Plant
The Martin P4M Mercator was a maritime reconnaissance aircraft built by the Glenn L. Martin Company.
Martin P4M Mercator (patrol bomber)

Naval Station Sangley Point

NS Sangley PointCaviteNAS Sangley Point
Starting in October 1951, electronic surveillance missions were flown from U.S. Naval Station Sangley Point in the Philippines (and, later from the Naval Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, and later Naval Air Station Atsugi, Japan, by a secretive unit that eventually gained the designation Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron One (VQ-1).
The naval station had a runway that was built after World War II, which was used by U.S. Navy Lockheed P-2 Neptune, Lockheed P-3 Orion, and Martin P4M Mercator maritime patrol and anti-submarine warfare aircraft.

VQ-1

Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron 1 (VQ-1)Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron ONE (VQ-1)Electronic Countermeasures Squadron One (VQ-1)
Starting in October 1951, electronic surveillance missions were flown from U.S. Naval Station Sangley Point in the Philippines (and, later from the Naval Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, and later Naval Air Station Atsugi, Japan, by a secretive unit that eventually gained the designation Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron One (VQ-1).
By 13 May 1953, when it was redesignated Detachment Able of Airborne Early Warning Squadron One (VW-1), the unit operated four P4M-1Q Mercators.

VP-21 (1943-69)

VB-111VPB-111Patrol Squadron 21 (VP-21)
The P4M entered service with Patrol Squadron 21 (VP-21) in 1950, the squadron deploying to NAS Port Lyautey in French Morocco.
28 June 1950: The squadron received its first P4M-1 Mercator. VP-21 was selected to be one of the few Navy patrol squadrons to fly the new Mercator. On 1 July 1951, the untested aircraft were flown on a 6500 mi circuit from NAS Pensacola, Florida, to San Diego and NAS Alameda, California, and Seattle, Washington. During the test flights all of the aircraft were operational, with no down time for repair.

VQ-2

Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron Two (VQ-2)
The aircraft were also operated out of Morocco by VQ-2, where one aircraft was intercepted near Ukrainian airspace by Soviet MiGs.
The squadron originally utilized the P-4M-1Q Mercator and the P-2V Neptune as mission aircraft.

HMS Chevron (R51)

HMS ''ChevronChevronHMS ''Chevron'' (R51)
The crew was rescued by HMS Chevron. One P4M-1Q of JQ-3 crashed at Ocean View, Virginia, on 6 January 1958, when it lost an engine on approach to NAS Norfolk, Virginia, killing four crew and injuring three civilians.
On 6 February 1952, the U.S. Navy Martin P4M-1Q Mercator, BuNo 124371, based in Port Lyautey, French Morocco, staging out of Nicosia, Cyprus, returning from an electronic reconnaissance mission over the Black Sea, made an open ocean dead-stick landing east of Cyprus.

List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (1950–1954)

a F-84 crasheda F-94 crashedditched
Another, on 6 February 1952, ditched north of Cyprus at night, out of fuel, with no power, losing only the Aircraft Commander/pilot after they were in the water (See United States Naval Institute, Naval History, March/April 1997).
:Martin P4M-1Q Mercator, BuNo 124371, based in Port Lyautey, French Morocco, staging out of Nicosia, Cyprus.

Naval Air Station Port Lyautey

NAS Port LyauteyPort LyauteyPort Lyautey Airfield
The P4M entered service with Patrol Squadron 21 (VP-21) in 1950, the squadron deploying to NAS Port Lyautey in French Morocco.
In this capacity, it primarily supported land-based naval reconnaissance aircraft of the period, such as the P4M Mercator in the 1950s, the P-2 Neptune in the 1950s and 1960s, and the P-3 Orion, EP-3 Aries and EA-3 Skywarrior in the 1960s and 1970s until the installation's closure as a USN facility and transfer to the Royal Moroccan Air Force in 1977.

List of accidents and incidents involving military aircraft (1955–1959)

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The crew was rescued by HMS Chevron. One P4M-1Q of JQ-3 crashed at Ocean View, Virginia, on 6 January 1958, when it lost an engine on approach to NAS Norfolk, Virginia, killing four crew and injuring three civilians.
;6 January : A U.S. Navy Martin P4M-1Q Mercator, BuNo 124373, of JQ-3, JQ tailcode, with 12 aboard, loses power in its port reciprocating engine while on final approach to NAS Norfolk, Virginia, comes down at 22nd Bay Street and East Ocean View Avenue in Ocean View, "demolishing three small houses and damaging three others. The plane and the last house it struck burned. Four of the airmen were unaccounted for. The eight survivors, of whom only one was seriously injured, were hospitalized. All were suffering from shock. Three civilians – occupants of three of the houses that were struck – were injured, none critically," stated the Associated Press.

1950 in aviation

195050July 1950
* June 28 – Martin P4M Mercator with United States Navy Patrol Squadron 21 (VP-21)

1960 in aviation

196016 August 1960July 1960
* July 2 – Martin P4M Mercator by United States Navy Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron 1 (VQ-1)

United States Navy

U.S. NavyNavyUS Navy
The Mercator was an unsuccessful contender for a United States Navy requirement for a long-range maritime patrol bomber, with the Lockheed P2V Neptune chosen instead.

Lockheed P-2 Neptune

Lockheed P2V NeptuneP2V NeptuneSP-2H Neptune
The Mercator was an unsuccessful contender for a United States Navy requirement for a long-range maritime patrol bomber, with the Lockheed P2V Neptune chosen instead.

Reconnaissance

scoutscoutsreconnaissance in force
It saw a limited life as a long-range electronic reconnaissance aircraft.

Reciprocating engine

piston engineenginePiston
Its most unusual feature was that it was powered by a combination of piston engines and turbojets, the latter being in the rear of the engine nacelles.

Turbojet

turbojet engineturbojetsturbojet engines
Its most unusual feature was that it was powered by a combination of piston engines and turbojets, the latter being in the rear of the engine nacelles.

Pratt & Whitney

Pratt and WhitneyPWP&W
A large and complicated aircraft, it was powered by two Pratt & Whitney R4360 Wasp Major 28-cylinder radial engines.

Pratt & Whitney R-4360 Wasp Major

R-4360Wasp MajorPratt & Whitney ''Wasp Major
A large and complicated aircraft, it was powered by two Pratt & Whitney R4360 Wasp Major 28-cylinder radial engines.

Radial engine

radialradial enginesradial piston engine
A large and complicated aircraft, it was powered by two Pratt & Whitney R4360 Wasp Major 28-cylinder radial engines.

Allison J33

J33Allison J33-A-35Allison J33 A
To give a boost during takeoff and combat, two Allison J33 turbojets were fitted in the rear of the two enlarged engine nacelles, the intakes being beneath and behind the radial engines.

Tricycle landing gear

tricycle undercarriagetricycle geartricycle
A tricycle undercarriage was fitted, with the nosewheel retracting forwards.

French protectorate in Morocco

MoroccoFrench MoroccoFrench protectorate
The P4M entered service with Patrol Squadron 21 (VP-21) in 1950, the squadron deploying to NAS Port Lyautey in French Morocco.

Signals intelligence

SIGINTelectronic intelligencecommunications intelligence
From 1951, the 18 surviving production P4Ms were modified for the electronic reconnaissance (or SIGINT, for signals intelligence) mission as the P4M-1Q, to replace the PB4Y-2 Privateer.

Consolidated PB4Y-2 Privateer

PB4Y-2 PrivateerPB4Y-2 PrivateersPB4Y-2
From 1951, the 18 surviving production P4Ms were modified for the electronic reconnaissance (or SIGINT, for signals intelligence) mission as the P4M-1Q, to replace the PB4Y-2 Privateer. Work began on the Model 219 in 1944, as a replacement for the PB4Y Privateer long-range patrol bomber, optimised for long range minelaying missions, with the first flight being on 20 October 1946.

Philippines

🇵🇭FilipinoPhilippine
Starting in October 1951, electronic surveillance missions were flown from U.S. Naval Station Sangley Point in the Philippines (and, later from the Naval Air Station Iwakuni, Japan, and later Naval Air Station Atsugi, Japan, by a secretive unit that eventually gained the designation Fleet Air Reconnaissance Squadron One (VQ-1).