Martin Ryle

Sir Martin RyleRyleM. RyleRyle, Sir Martin
Sir Martin Ryle (27 September 1918 – 14 October 1984) was an English radio astronomer who developed revolutionary radio telescope systems (see e.g. aperture synthesis) and used them for accurate location and imaging of weak radio sources.wikipedia
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Antony Hewish

Tony HewishHewishHewish, Anthony
Ryle and Antony Hewish shared the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1974, the first Nobel prize awarded in recognition of astronomical research.
Antony Hewish (born 11 May 1924) is a British radio astronomer who won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1974 (together with fellow radio-astronomer Martin Ryle) for his role in the discovery of pulsars.

Aperture synthesis

aperture synthesis imagingsynthetic apertureinterferometric imaging
Sir Martin Ryle (27 September 1918 – 14 October 1984) was an English radio astronomer who developed revolutionary radio telescope systems (see e.g. aperture synthesis) and used them for accurate location and imaging of weak radio sources.
Aperture synthesis imaging was first developed at radio wavelengths by Martin Ryle and coworkers from the Radio Astronomy Group at Cambridge University.

Radio astronomy

radio astronomerradioradioastronomy
Sir Martin Ryle (27 September 1918 – 14 October 1984) was an English radio astronomer who developed revolutionary radio telescope systems (see e.g. aperture synthesis) and used them for accurate location and imaging of weak radio sources.
Martin Ryle and Antony Hewish at the Cavendish Astrophysics Group developed the technique of Earth-rotation aperture synthesis.

Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory

Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory (MRAO)MullardMullard Observatory
He was the first Professor of Radio Astronomy at the University of Cambridge, and founding director of the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory.
The observatory was founded under Martin Ryle of the Radio-Astronomy Group of the Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge and was opened by Sir Edward Victor Appleton on 25 July 1957.

Derek Vonberg

Derek Daniel Vonberg
In 1946 Ryle and Derek Vonberg were the first people to publish interferometric astronomical measurements at radio wavelengths.
Vonberg studied at Imperial College then joined the Cavendish Laboratory in 1945 where he worked with Martin Ryle.

Radio telescope

radio telescopesradiotelescoperadio-telescope
Sir Martin Ryle (27 September 1918 – 14 October 1984) was an English radio astronomer who developed revolutionary radio telescope systems (see e.g. aperture synthesis) and used them for accurate location and imaging of weak radio sources.
Martin Ryle's group in Cambridge obtained a Nobel Prize for interferometry and aperture synthesis.

Cavendish Astrophysics Group

Radio Astronomy GroupCambridge Radio Astronomy GroupProfessor of Radio Astronomy
He was the first Professor of Radio Astronomy at the University of Cambridge, and founding director of the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory. Ryle had heated arguments with Fred Hoyle of the Institute of Astronomy about Hoyle's Steady State Universe, which restricted collaboration between the Cavendish Radio Astronomy Group and the Institute of Astronomy during the 1960s.
Sir Martin Ryle, 1918-1984, Nobel Prize for Physics, founder of the group, former British Astronomer Royal

Astronomer Royal

Astronomer-RoyalAstronomers Royalastronomer
He was Astronomer Royal from 1972 to 1982.
1972–1982 Sir Martin Ryle

Cavendish Laboratory

CavendishTCM GroupCambridge
After the war, he received a fellowship at the Cavendish Laboratory.
Radio Astronomy (led by Martin Ryle and Antony Hewish), with the Cavendish Astrophysics Groups telescopes being based at Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory.

Fred Hoyle

HoyleSir Fred HoyleFred
Ryle had heated arguments with Fred Hoyle of the Institute of Astronomy about Hoyle's Steady State Universe, which restricted collaboration between the Cavendish Radio Astronomy Group and the Institute of Astronomy during the 1960s.
Hoyle had a famously heated argument with Martin Ryle of the Cavendish Radio Astronomy Group about Hoyle's steady state theory, which somewhat restricted collaboration between the Cavendish group and the Cambridge Institute of Astronomy during the 1960s.

Ryle Telescope

Ryle
Ryle Telescope at Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory
The Ryle Telescope (named after Martin Ryle, and formerly known as the 5-km Array) was a linear east-west radio telescope array at the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory.

Telecommunications Research Establishment

TREBawdsey Research Stationearly radar in the UK during World War II
In 1939, Ryle worked with the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) on the design of antennas for airborne radar equipment during World War II.
Antony Hewish, physicist and radio astronomer. He worked with Martin Ryle at TRE on the design of antennas for airborne radar during World War II. In 1984, they shared the Nobel Prize in Physics.

John Ryle (physician)

John RyleJ. A. RyleJohn Alfred
Martin Ryle was born in Brighton, the son of Professor John Alfred Ryle and Miriam (née Scully) Ryle.
They had several children, including astronomer Martin Ryle.

Christ Church, Oxford

Christ ChurchChrist Church CollegeStudent
After studying at Bradfield College, Ryle studied physics at Christ Church, Oxford.
In the sciences, polymath and natural philosopher Robert Hooke, developmental biologist John B. Gurdon (co-winner of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine), physician Sir Archibald Edward Garrod, the Father of Modern Medicine Sir William Osler, biochemist Kenneth Callow, radio astronomer Sir Martin Ryle, psychologist Edward de Bono and epidemiologist Sir Richard Doll are all associated with the college.

Hughes Medal

Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society

Gold MedalGold Medal for AstrophysicsGold Medal of the RAS
Gold Medal of the Royal Astronomical Society (1964)

Astronomical interferometer

astronomical interferometryinterferometerinterferometry
In 1946 Ryle and Derek Vonberg were the first people to publish interferometric astronomical measurements at radio wavelengths.
M. Ryle & D. Vonberg, 1946 Solar radiation on 175Mc/s, Nature 158 pp 339

Malcolm Longair

LongairM. S. LongairProfessor Malcolm Longair
He became a research student in the Radio Astronomy Group of the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, where he completed his Ph.D. in 1967 supervised by Martin Ryle.

J. A. Ratcliffe

J A RatcliffeJ. A. (Jack) RatcliffeJohn A. Ratcliffe
Martin Ryle, Bernard Lovell, and Antony Hewish were co-workers there, and Ryle and Hewish joined his radio-physics group at Cambridge after WW2.

Bruce Medal

Bruce Gold MedalCatherine Wolfe Bruce Gold MedalCatherine Wolfe Bruce medal
Bruce Medal (1974)
1974 – Martin Ryle

Royal Institution Christmas Lectures

Royal Institution Christmas LectureChristmas LecturesChristmas lecture series
In 1965 Ryle co-delivered the Royal Institution Christmas Lecture on Exploration of the Universe.

England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
Sir Martin Ryle (27 September 1918 – 14 October 1984) was an English radio astronomer who developed revolutionary radio telescope systems (see e.g. aperture synthesis) and used them for accurate location and imaging of weak radio sources.