Martyrs of Compiègne

Martyrs of Compiegne16 Carmelite Martyrs of Compiègne16 Carmelite nunsBlessed Teresa of Saint Augustine and companionsCarmelite Martyrs of CompiegneCarmelite Nuns of CompiègneCarmelites of Compiegnenuns
The Martyrs of Compiègne were the 16 members of the Carmel of Compiègne, France: 11 Discalced Carmelite nuns, three lay sisters, and two externs (tertiaries of the Order, who would handle the community's needs outside the monastery).wikipedia
69 Related Articles

Picpus Cemetery

Cimetière de PicpusPicpus
They were guillotined on 17 July 1794, during the Reign of Terror and buried in a mass grave at Picpus Cemetery.
Among the women, 16 Carmelite nuns ranging in age from 29 to 78, were brought to the guillotine together, singing hymns as they were led to the scaffold, an incident commemorated in Poulenc's opera, Dialogues of the Carmelites.

Marie-Geneviève Meunier

Sister Constance
The novice of the community, Sister Constance, was the first to die, then the lay Sisters and externs, and so on, ending with the prioress, Mother Teresa of St. Augustine, O.C.D.
Marie-Geneviève Meunier, (28 May 1765 – 17 July 1794), also known as Sister Constance, was a Carmelite novice and one of the Carmelite Martyrs of Compiegne.

Dialogues of the Carmelites

Dialogues des CarmélitesDialogues des CarmelitesLe Dialogue des carmélites
In the course of the 20th century, the Martyrs of Compiègne have been the subject of a massive scholarly history, a German novella, a French play, a film, and Francis Poulenc's opera Dialogues of the Carmelites.
The opera tells a fictionalised version of the story of the Martyrs of Compiègne, Carmelite nuns who, in 1794 during the closing days of the Reign of Terror during the French Revolution, were guillotined in Paris for refusing to renounce their vocation.

Compiègne

CompiegneCompeigneCompiegne, France
The Martyrs of Compiègne were the 16 members of the Carmel of Compiègne, France: 11 Discalced Carmelite nuns, three lay sisters, and two externs (tertiaries of the Order, who would handle the community's needs outside the monastery).

Francis Poulenc

PoulencPoulenc, FrancisF. Poulenc
In the course of the 20th century, the Martyrs of Compiègne have been the subject of a massive scholarly history, a German novella, a French play, a film, and Francis Poulenc's opera Dialogues of the Carmelites.
The text, based on a short story by Gertrud von Le Fort, depicts the Martyrs of Compiègne, nuns guillotined during the French Revolution for their religious beliefs.

Discalced Carmelites

Discalced CarmeliteO.C.D.OCD
The Martyrs of Compiègne were the 16 members of the Carmel of Compiègne, France: 11 Discalced Carmelite nuns, three lay sisters, and two externs (tertiaries of the Order, who would handle the community's needs outside the monastery).
Teresa Benedicta of the Cross), Père Jacques and the sixteen Martyrs of Compiegne.

Dialogue with the Carmelites

Le Dialogue des Carmélitesfilm based on Bernanos' play
Dialogue with the Carmelites, a film adaptation of Bernanos' play, was released in 1960, starring Jeanne Moreau.
It's the story of the Martyrs of Compiègne, Carmelite nuns who were guillotined in Paris in 1794 in the waning days of the Reign of Terror during the French Revolution, after refusing to renounce their vocation.

Place de la Nation

NationPlace du TrôneBarrière du Trône
On 17 July 1794, in the closing days of the Reign of Terror led by Robespierre, sixteen Carmelite nuns of the Catholic Church were guillotined at the Barrière de Vincennes (now the Place de la Nation) in Paris.

Gertrud von Le Fort

Gertrude von Le Fort
In 1931, the German convert, Baroness Gertrud von Le Fort, published a novella which was inspired by the events of their deaths, Die Letzte am Schafott (The Last One at the Scaffold).
In 1931, Le Fort published the novella, Die Letzte am Schafott (The Last at the Scaffold), based on the 1794 execution of the Carmelite Martyrs of Compiègne.

Carmelites

CarmeliteCarmelite OrderO. Carm.
The Martyrs of Compiègne were the 16 members of the Carmel of Compiègne, France: 11 Discalced Carmelite nuns, three lay sisters, and two externs (tertiaries of the Order, who would handle the community's needs outside the monastery).

Georges Bernanos

BernanosGeorge Bernanos
Baroness von Le Fort's novella inspired a play written by the French Catholic author, Georges Bernanos.

France

FrenchFRAFrench Republic
The Martyrs of Compiègne were the 16 members of the Carmel of Compiègne, France: 11 Discalced Carmelite nuns, three lay sisters, and two externs (tertiaries of the Order, who would handle the community's needs outside the monastery).

Lay brother

lay brotherslay sisterbrothers
The Martyrs of Compiègne were the 16 members of the Carmel of Compiègne, France: 11 Discalced Carmelite nuns, three lay sisters, and two externs (tertiaries of the Order, who would handle the community's needs outside the monastery).

Third order

tertiarytertiariesThird Orders
The Martyrs of Compiègne were the 16 members of the Carmel of Compiègne, France: 11 Discalced Carmelite nuns, three lay sisters, and two externs (tertiaries of the Order, who would handle the community's needs outside the monastery).

French Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary FranceRevolutionary
During the French Revolution, they refused to obey the Civil Constitution of the Clergy of the Revolutionary government, which mandated the suppression of their monastery.

Civil Constitution of the Clergy

non-juring priestsConstitutional ChurchFrench constitution
During the French Revolution, they refused to obey the Civil Constitution of the Clergy of the Revolutionary government, which mandated the suppression of their monastery.

National Convention

ConventionFrench National ConventionFrench Convention
During the French Revolution, they refused to obey the Civil Constitution of the Clergy of the Revolutionary government, which mandated the suppression of their monastery.

Suppression of monasteries

suppressedsuppressionsuppressing
During the French Revolution, they refused to obey the Civil Constitution of the Clergy of the Revolutionary government, which mandated the suppression of their monastery.

Reign of Terror

the TerrorTerrorFrench Terror
They were guillotined on 17 July 1794, during the Reign of Terror and buried in a mass grave at Picpus Cemetery. On 17 July 1794, in the closing days of the Reign of Terror led by Robespierre, sixteen Carmelite nuns of the Catholic Church were guillotined at the Barrière de Vincennes (now the Place de la Nation) in Paris.

English people

EnglishEnglishmanEnglishmen
They were imprisoned in Compiègne along with a community of English Benedictine nuns who had been brought from Cambrai where they had established a monastery for women of their nation, since monastic life had been banned in England since the Reign of Henry VIII.

Benedictines

BenedictineO.S.B.Order of Saint Benedict
They were imprisoned in Compiègne along with a community of English Benedictine nuns who had been brought from Cambrai where they had established a monastery for women of their nation, since monastic life had been banned in England since the Reign of Henry VIII.

Dissolution of the Monasteries

dissolutiondissolvedSuppression of the Monasteries
They were imprisoned in Compiègne along with a community of English Benedictine nuns who had been brought from Cambrai where they had established a monastery for women of their nation, since monastic life had been banned in England since the Reign of Henry VIII.

Henry VIII of England

Henry VIIIKing Henry VIIIKing Henry VIII of England
They were imprisoned in Compiègne along with a community of English Benedictine nuns who had been brought from Cambrai where they had established a monastery for women of their nation, since monastic life had been banned in England since the Reign of Henry VIII.

Paris

Paris, FranceParísParisian
On 17 July 1794, in the closing days of the Reign of Terror led by Robespierre, sixteen Carmelite nuns of the Catholic Church were guillotined at the Barrière de Vincennes (now the Place de la Nation) in Paris. The Carmelite community was transported to the Conciergerie in Paris, and were brought before the Revolutionary Tribunal, condemned as a group as traitors and sentenced to death.

Treason

high treasontraitortraitors
The Carmelite community was transported to the Conciergerie in Paris, and were brought before the Revolutionary Tribunal, condemned as a group as traitors and sentenced to death.