A report on Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site

The Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site preserves the house of Mary McLeod Bethune, located in Northwest Washington, D.C., at 1318 Vermont Avenue NW.

- Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site

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National Archives for Black Women's History

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Archive located at 3300 Hubbard Rd, Landover, Maryland.

Archive located at 3300 Hubbard Rd, Landover, Maryland.

Originally housed at 1318 Vermont Avenue, Washington, D.C. in the carriage house of the former home of Mary McLeod Bethune, which is now a National Historic Site, the archive was controversially moved in 2014 by the National Park Service citing concerns over the inadequacy of the original site for preservation of its collection.

Bettye Collier-Thomas

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Scholar of African-American women's history.

Scholar of African-American women's history.

In 1982, the BMA was designated a National Historic Site and its name changed to the Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site.

Bethune photographed by Carl Van Vechten on April 6, 1949

Mary McLeod Bethune

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American educator, philanthropist, humanitarian, womanist, and civil rights activist.

American educator, philanthropist, humanitarian, womanist, and civil rights activist.

Bethune photographed by Carl Van Vechten on April 6, 1949
The cabin in Mayesville, South Carolina 
where Mary McLeod was born
Mary McLeod Bethune with girls from the Literary and Industrial Training School for Negro Girls in Daytona, c. 1905.
Marian Anderson celebrated contralto and Mary McLeod Bethune, Director of Negro Affairs in the National Youth Administration at the launching of the SS Booker T. Washington with unidentified workers who helped construct the first Liberty ship named for an African American at the California Shipbuilding Corporation's yards by Alfred T. Palmer.
Mary McLeod Bethune (left) and Eleanor Roosevelt (center), 1943
Painting of Bethune by Betsy Graves Reyneau
The Mary McLeod Bethune Council House National Historic Site in Washington, D.C.
A painting of Bethune on display at the World Methodist Museum, Lake Junaluska, North Carolina
Mary Bethune bust by Selma Burke

Honors include designation of her home in Daytona Beach as a National Historic Landmark, her house in Washington, D.C. as a National Historic Site, and the installation of a memorial sculpture of her in Lincoln Park in Washington, D.C. The 17 ft bronze statue, unveiled in 1974, “is the first monument to honor an African American and a woman in a public park in Washington, D.C." The Legislature of Florida designated her in 2018 as the subject of one of Florida's two statues in the National Statuary Hall Collection.

Logan Circle (Washington, D.C.)

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Traffic circle park, neighborhood, and historic district in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C. The primarily residential neighborhood includes two historic districts, properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and sites designated D.C. Historic Landmarks.

Traffic circle park, neighborhood, and historic district in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C. The primarily residential neighborhood includes two historic districts, properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and sites designated D.C. Historic Landmarks.

The Major General John A. Logan equestrian statue stands in the center of Logan Circle.
Row houses on the northeast corner of Logan Circle, including the former residence (corner building) of writer Ambrose Bierce
4-15 Logan Circle NW
The Central Union Mission's longtime facility in Logan Circle was sold in 2008. Redevelopment plans include new office space or luxury residential units.
John Wesley A.M.E. Zion Church, located on 14th Street NW
The Iowa, designed by Thomas Franklin Schneider in 1901, was the birthplace of anthropologist Julian Steward.
Garrison Elementary School

The former home of Mary McLeod Bethune, an African American educator, author, and civil rights leader who founded the National Council of Negro Women, is located at 1318 Vermont Avenue NW, one block south of the circle.