Mary Shelley

Richard Rothwell's portrait of Shelley was shown at the Royal Academy in 1840, accompanied by lines from Percy Shelley's poem The Revolt of Islam calling her a "child of love and light".
Page from William Godwin's journal recording "Birth of Mary, 20 minutes after 11 at night" (left column, fourth row)
The Polygon (at left) in Somers Town, London, between Camden Town and St Pancras, where Mary Godwin was born and spent her earliest years
On 26 June 1814, Mary Godwin declared her love for Percy Shelley at Mary Wollstonecraft's graveside in the churchyard of St Pancras Old Church (shown here in 1815).
Percy Bysshe Shelley was inspired by the radicalism of Godwin's Political Justice (1793). When the poet Robert Southey met Shelley, he felt as if he were seeing himself from the 1790s. (Portrait by Amelia Curran, 1819.)
Draft of Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus ("It was on a dreary night of November that I beheld my man completed ...")
William "Willmouse" Shelley, painted just before his death from malaria in 1819 (portrait by Amelia Curran, 1819)
Claire Clairmont, Mary's stepsister and mistress of Lord Byron (portrait by Amelia Curran, 1819)
Reginald Easton's miniature of Mary Shelley is allegedly drawn from her death mask (c. 1857).
In order to fulfil Mary Shelley's wishes, Percy Florence and his wife Jane had the coffins of Mary Shelley's parents exhumed and buried with her in Bournemouth.
The frontispiece to the 1831 Frankenstein by Theodor von Holst, one of the first two illustrations for the novel
Shelley frequently wrote stories to accompany prepared illustrations for gift books, such as this one, which accompanied "Transformation" in the 1830 The Keepsake.
Engraving by George Stodart after a monument of Mary and Percy Shelley by Henry Weekes (1853)

English novelist who wrote the Gothic novel Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus (1818), which is considered an early example of science fiction.

- Mary Shelley
Richard Rothwell's portrait of Shelley was shown at the Royal Academy in 1840, accompanied by lines from Percy Shelley's poem The Revolt of Islam calling her a "child of love and light".

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Mary Wollstonecraft by John Opie, c. 1797

Mary Wollstonecraft

English writer, philosopher, and advocate of women's rights.

English writer, philosopher, and advocate of women's rights.

Mary Wollstonecraft by John Opie, c. 1797
Wollstonecraft in 1790–91, by John Opie
Frontispiece to the 1791 edition of Original Stories from Real Life engraved by William Blake
10 August attack on the Tuileries Palace; French revolutionary violence spreads
Portrait of William Godwin by James Northcote, oil on canvas, 1802
Title page for Godwin's Memoirs of the Author of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1798)
Green plaque on Newington Green Primary School, near the site of a school that Wollstonecraft, her sisters (Everina and Eliza), and Fanny Blood set up; the plaque was unveiled in 2011.
Blue plaque at 45 Dolben Street, Southwark, where she lived from 1788; unveiled in 2004 by Claire Tomalin
Plaque on Oakshott Court, near the site of her final home, The Polygon, Somers Town, London
A Sculpture for Mary Wollstonecraft in Newington Green, London
First page of the first edition of Thoughts on the Education of Daughters (1787)
Title page from the first American edition of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792)
Otto Scholderer's Young Girl Reading (1883); in both Mary and The Wrongs of Woman, Wollstonecraft criticises women who imagine themselves as sentimental heroines.
The Icebergs (1861) by Frederic Edwin Church demonstrates the aesthetic of the sublime.

She died 11 days after giving birth to her second daughter, Mary Shelley, who would become an accomplished writer and the author of Frankenstein.

Volume I, first edition

Frankenstein

Volume I, first edition
Mary Shelley by Richard Rothwell (1840–41)
Draft of Frankenstein ("It was on a dreary night of November that I beheld my man completed ...")
An English editorial cartoonist conceives the Irish Fenian movement as akin to Frankenstein's creature, in the wake of the Phoenix Park murders in an 1882 issue of Punch.
Illustration by Theodor von Holst from the frontispiece of the 1831 edition
In 1910, Edison Studios released the first motion-picture adaptation of Shelley's story.
A variety of different editions

Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is an 1818 novel written by English author Mary Shelley.

Portrait of Shelley, by Alfred Clint (1829)

Percy Bysshe Shelley

One of the major English Romantic poets.

One of the major English Romantic poets.

Portrait of Shelley, by Alfred Clint (1829)
William Godwin in 1802, by James Northcote
Richard Rothwell's portrait of Mary Shelley in later life was shown at the Royal Academy in 1840, accompanied by lines from Percy Shelley's poem The Revolt of Islam calling her a "child of love and light".
Routes of the 1814 and 1816 Continental tours
Posthumous Portrait of Shelley Writing Prometheus Unbound in Italy – painting by Joseph Severn, 1845
The Funeral of Shelley by Louis Édouard Fournier (1889). Pictured in the centre are, from left, Trelawny, Hunt, and Byron. In fact, Hunt did not observe the cremation, and Byron left early. Mary Shelley, who is pictured kneeling at left, did not attend the funeral.
Shelley's gravestone in the Cimitero Acattolico in Rome; phrases from "Ariel's Song" in Shakespeare's The Tempest appear below
Keats–Shelley Memorial House, at right with a red sign by the Spanish Steps, Rome

His second wife, Mary Shelley, was the author of Frankenstein.

Clairmont in 1819, painted by Amelia Curran

Claire Clairmont

Clairmont in 1819, painted by Amelia Curran
Lord Byron
Percy Bysshe Shelley in 1819
Mary Shelley, about 1820
Clara Allegra Byron, about 1822
Edward John Trelawny
Tomb of Claire Clairmont at Cimitero della Misericordia dell'Antella, Florence, Italy

Clara Mary Jane Clairmont (27 April 1798 – 19 March 1879), or Claire Clairmont as she was commonly known, was the stepsister of the writer Mary Shelley and the mother of Lord Byron's daughter Allegra.

The apocalypse is also depicted in visual art, for example in Albert Goodwin's painting Apocalypse (1903).

Apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic fiction

Subgenre of science fiction, science fantasy, dystopia or horror in which the Earth's civilization is collapsing or has collapsed.

Subgenre of science fiction, science fantasy, dystopia or horror in which the Earth's civilization is collapsing or has collapsed.

The apocalypse is also depicted in visual art, for example in Albert Goodwin's painting Apocalypse (1903).
Joseph Pennell's 1918 prophetic Liberty bond poster calls up the pictorial image of a bombed New York City, totally engulfed in a firestorm. At the time, the armaments available to the world's various air forces were not powerful enough to produce such a result.
Imagination magazine cover, depicting an atomic explosion, dated March 1954.
An artist's 1922 depiction of a futuristic war.
A Fallout Cosplayer photographed at a Comic Con in a Fallout Themed area.

Various ancient societies, including the Babylonian and Judaic, produced apocalyptic literature and mythology which dealt with the end of the world and of human society, such as the Epic of Gilgamesh, written c. 2000–1500 BC. Recognizable modern apocalyptic novels had existed since at least the first third of the 19th century, when Mary Shelley's The Last Man (1826) was published.

John William Polidori

English writer and physician.

English writer and physician.

The Vampyre; A Tale, 1819

At the Villa Diodati, a house Byron rented by Lake Geneva in Switzerland, the pair met with Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin, her husband-to-be, Percy Bysshe Shelley, and their companion (Mary's stepsister) Claire Clairmont.

The Castle of Otranto (1764) is regarded as the first Gothic novel. The aesthetics of the book have shaped modern-day gothic books, films, art, music and the goth subculture.

Gothic fiction

Loose literary aesthetic of fear and haunting.

Loose literary aesthetic of fear and haunting.

The Castle of Otranto (1764) is regarded as the first Gothic novel. The aesthetics of the book have shaped modern-day gothic books, films, art, music and the goth subculture.
The ruins of Wolf's Crag castle in Walter Scott's The Bride of Lammermoor (1819)
Strawberry Hill, an English villa in the "Gothic Revival" style, built by Gothic writer Horace Walpole
Ann Radcliffe's The Mysteries of Udolpho (1794), a bestselling Gothic novel. Frontispiece to 4th edition shown.
Catherine Morland, the naive protagonist of Northanger Abbey (1818), Jane Austen's Gothic parody
Mary Shelley's Frankenstein; or, the Modern Prometheus (1818) has come to define Gothic fiction in the Romantic period. Frontispiece to 1831 edition shown.
Viy, lord of the underworld, from the story of the same name by Gogol
Cover of a Varney the Vampire publication, 1845
Jane Eyre's trial through the moors in Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre (1847)
Miss Havisham from Dickens’ Great Expectations
Robert Louis Stevenson's Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886) was a classic Gothic work of the 1880s, seeing many stage adaptations.
Le Horla (1887) by Guy de Maupassant
Pulp magazines such as Weird Tales reprinted and popularized Gothic horror from the previous century.

The Gothic influence continued into the early 19th century, works by the Romantic poets, and novelists such as Mary Shelley, Walter Scott and E. T. A. Hoffmann frequently drew upon gothic motifs in their works.

1837 map, showing St Pancras, Regent's Canal, Clarendon Square, Somers Town, Pentonville, Kings Cross and Euston Square

Somers Town, London

Inner-city district in North West London.

Inner-city district in North West London.

1837 map, showing St Pancras, Regent's Canal, Clarendon Square, Somers Town, Pentonville, Kings Cross and Euston Square
Clarendon Square, with The Polygon on left and St Aloysius Chapel on right (1850 engraving by Joseph Swain from an earlier sketch)

Mary Wollstonecraft, writer, philosopher and feminist, lived there with her husband William Godwin, and died there in 1797 after giving birth to the future Mary Shelley, author of Frankenstein.

Portrait by Henry William Pickersgill

William Godwin

English journalist, political philosopher and novelist.

English journalist, political philosopher and novelist.

Portrait by Henry William Pickersgill
James Northcote, William Godwin, oil on canvas, 1802, the National Portrait Gallery
Mary Wollstonecraft by John Opie (c. 1797)

Their daughter, later known as Mary Shelley, would go on to write Frankenstein and marry the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley.

"The Poet's Son", a caricature by Ape published in Vanity Fair in 1879

Percy Florence Shelley

"The Poet's Son", a caricature by Ape published in Vanity Fair in 1879

Sir Percy Florence Shelley, 3rd Baronet of Castle Goring (12 November 1819 – 5 December 1889) was the son of the English poet Percy Bysshe Shelley and his second wife, Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, novelist and author of Frankenstein.