Mathematics

mathematicalmathmathematicianMathsArithmeticmathematicmathematicallymathematiciansCountingmathematical sciences
Mathematics (from Greek μάθημα máthēma, "knowledge, study, learning") includes the study of such topics as quantity (number theory), structure (algebra), space (geometry), and change (mathematical analysis).wikipedia
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Algebra

algebraicAlgebra IAlgebra 1
Mathematics (from Greek μάθημα máthēma, "knowledge, study, learning") includes the study of such topics as quantity (number theory), structure (algebra), space (geometry), and change (mathematical analysis). Evidence for more complex mathematics does not appear until around 3000 BC, when the Babylonians and Egyptians began using arithmetic, algebra and geometry for taxation and other financial calculations, for building and construction, and for astronomy.
Algebra (from الجبر, transliterated "al-jabr", literally meaning "reunion of broken parts" ) is one of the broad parts of mathematics, together with number theory, geometry and analysis.

Geometry

geometricgeometricalgeometries
Mathematics (from Greek μάθημα máthēma, "knowledge, study, learning") includes the study of such topics as quantity (number theory), structure (algebra), space (geometry), and change (mathematical analysis). Evidence for more complex mathematics does not appear until around 3000 BC, when the Babylonians and Egyptians began using arithmetic, algebra and geometry for taxation and other financial calculations, for building and construction, and for astronomy.
Geometry (from the ; geo- "earth", -metron "measurement") is a branch of mathematics concerned with questions of shape, size, relative position of figures, and the properties of space.

Calculus

infinitesimal calculusdifferential and integral calculusclassical calculus
Mathematics (from Greek μάθημα máthēma, "knowledge, study, learning") includes the study of such topics as quantity (number theory), structure (algebra), space (geometry), and change (mathematical analysis).
Calculus, originally called infinitesimal calculus or "the calculus of infinitesimals", is the mathematical study of continuous change, in the same way that geometry is the study of shape and algebra is the study of generalizations of arithmetic operations.

Mathematical structure

structurestructuresmathematical structures
Mathematics (from Greek μάθημα máthēma, "knowledge, study, learning") includes the study of such topics as quantity (number theory), structure (algebra), space (geometry), and change (mathematical analysis).
In mathematics, a structure on a set is an additional mathematical object that, in some manner, attaches (or relates) to that set to endow it with some additional meaning or significance.

Conjecture

conjecturalconjecturesconjectured
Mathematicians seek and use patterns to formulate new conjectures; they resolve the truth or falsity of conjectures by mathematical proof.
In mathematics, a conjecture is a conclusion or a proposition which is suspected to be true due to preliminary supporting evidence, but for which no proof or disproof has yet been found.

Abstraction (mathematics)

abstractabstractionAbstraction in mathematics
Through the use of abstraction and logic, mathematics developed from counting, calculation, measurement, and the systematic study of the shapes and motions of physical objects.
Abstraction in mathematics is the process of extracting the underlying structures, patterns or properties of a mathematical concept, removing any dependence on real world objects with which it might originally have been connected, and generalizing it so that it has wider applications or matching among other abstract descriptions of equivalent phenomena.

History of mathematics

historian of mathematicsmathematicshistory
Practical mathematics has been a human activity from as far back as written records exist.
The area of study known as the history of mathematics is primarily an investigation into the origin of discoveries in mathematics and, to a lesser extent, an investigation into the mathematical methods and notation of the past.

Logic

logicianlogicallogics
Through the use of abstraction and logic, mathematics developed from counting, calculation, measurement, and the systematic study of the shapes and motions of physical objects. Rigorous arguments first appeared in Greek mathematics, most notably in Euclid's Elements.
Historically, logic has been studied in philosophy (since ancient times) and mathematics (since the mid-19th century), and recently logic has been studied in cognitive science (encompasses computer science, linguistics, philosophy and psychology).

Definition

definitionsdefineddefine
It has no generally accepted definition. Since the pioneering work of Giuseppe Peano (1858–1932), David Hilbert (1862–1943), and others on axiomatic systems in the late 19th century, it has become customary to view mathematical research as establishing truth by rigorous deduction from appropriately chosen axioms and definitions.
In mathematics, a definition is used to give a precise meaning to a new term, by describing a condition which unambiguously qualifies what a mathematical term is and is not.

Pattern

patternsgeometric patternsgeometric pattern
Mathematicians seek and use patterns to formulate new conjectures; they resolve the truth or falsity of conjectures by mathematical proof.
Conversely, abstract patterns in science, mathematics, or language may be observable only by analysis.

Greek mathematics

Greek mathematicianancient Greek mathematiciansGreek
Rigorous arguments first appeared in Greek mathematics, most notably in Euclid's Elements.
Greek mathematics refers to mathematics texts written during and ideas stemming from the Classical and Hellinistic periods, extant from the 7th century BC to the 4th century AD, around the shores of the Eastern Mediterranean.

Euclid's Elements

ElementsEuclid's ''ElementsEuclid
Rigorous arguments first appeared in Greek mathematics, most notably in Euclid's Elements.
The Elements ( Stoicheia) is a mathematical treatise consisting of 13 books attributed to the ancient Greek mathematician Euclid in Alexandria, Ptolemaic Egypt c. 300 BC.

Foundations of mathematics

foundation of mathematicsfoundationsfoundational
Since the pioneering work of Giuseppe Peano (1858–1932), David Hilbert (1862–1943), and others on axiomatic systems in the late 19th century, it has become customary to view mathematical research as establishing truth by rigorous deduction from appropriately chosen axioms and definitions.
Foundations of mathematics is the study of the philosophical and logical and/or algorithmic basis of mathematics, or, in a broader sense, the mathematical investigation of what underlies the philosophical theories concerning the nature of mathematics.

David Hilbert

HilbertHilbert, DavidD. Hilbert
Since the pioneering work of Giuseppe Peano (1858–1932), David Hilbert (1862–1943), and others on axiomatic systems in the late 19th century, it has become customary to view mathematical research as establishing truth by rigorous deduction from appropriately chosen axioms and definitions.
A famous example of his leadership in mathematics is his 1900 presentation of a collection of problems that set the course for much of the mathematical research of the 20th century.

Axiom

axiomspostulateaxiomatic
Since the pioneering work of Giuseppe Peano (1858–1932), David Hilbert (1862–1943), and others on axiomatic systems in the late 19th century, it has become customary to view mathematical research as establishing truth by rigorous deduction from appropriately chosen axioms and definitions.
As used in mathematics, the term axiom is used in two related but distinguishable senses: "logical axioms" and "non-logical axioms".

Quantity

quantitiesquantitativeamount
Mathematics (from Greek μάθημα máthēma, "knowledge, study, learning") includes the study of such topics as quantity (number theory), structure (algebra), space (geometry), and change (mathematical analysis).
Quantity is among the basic classes of things along with quality, substance, change, and relation.

Applied mathematics

applied mathematicianappliedapplications of mathematics
Applied mathematics has led to entirely new mathematical disciplines, such as statistics and game theory.
Applied mathematics is the application of mathematical methods by different fields such as science, engineering, business, computer science, and industry.

Pure mathematics

pureabstract mathematicspure mathematician
Mathematicians engage in pure mathematics (mathematics for its own sake) without having any application in mind, but practical applications for what began as pure mathematics are often discovered later.
Pure mathematics is the study of mathematical concepts independently of any application outside mathematics.

Euclid

Euclid of AlexandriaEuklidGreek Mathematician
Rigorous arguments first appeared in Greek mathematics, most notably in Euclid's Elements.
His Elements is one of the most influential works in the history of mathematics, serving as the main textbook for teaching mathematics (especially geometry) from the time of its publication until the late 19th or early 20th century.

Astronomy

astronomicalastronomerastronomers
Evidence for more complex mathematics does not appear until around 3000 BC, when the Babylonians and Egyptians began using arithmetic, algebra and geometry for taxation and other financial calculations, for building and construction, and for astronomy.
It uses mathematics, physics, and chemistry in order to explain their origin and evolution.

Pythagorean theorem

Pythagoras' theoremPythagorasPythagoras's theorem
Many early texts mention Pythagorean triples and so, by inference, the Pythagorean theorem seems to be the most ancient and widespread mathematical development after basic arithmetic and geometry.
In mathematics, the Pythagorean theorem, also known as Pythagoras' theorem, is a fundamental relation in Euclidean geometry among the three sides of a right triangle.

Arithmetic

arithmetic operationsarithmeticsarithmetic operation
Evidence for more complex mathematics does not appear until around 3000 BC, when the Babylonians and Egyptians began using arithmetic, algebra and geometry for taxation and other financial calculations, for building and construction, and for astronomy.
Arithmetic (from the Greek ἀριθμός arithmos, "number" and τική [τέχνη], tiké [téchne], "art") is a branch of mathematics that consists of the study of numbers, especially the properties of the traditional operations on them—addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.

Mesopotamia

MesopotamianMesopotamiansAncient Iraq
The most ancient mathematical texts from Mesopotamia and Egypt are from 2000–1800 BC.
It has been identified as having "inspired some of the most important developments in human history, including the invention of the wheel, the planting of the first cereal crops and the development of cursive script, mathematics, astronomy and agriculture".

Parabola

parabolicparabolic curveparabolic arc
He developed formulas for calculating the surface area and volume of solids of revolution and used the method of exhaustion to calculate the area under the arc of a parabola with the summation of an infinite series, in a manner not too dissimilar from modern calculus.
In mathematics, a parabola is a plane curve which is mirror-symmetrical and is approximately U shaped.

Solid of revolution

solids of revolutionbodies of revolutionaxis of revolution
He developed formulas for calculating the surface area and volume of solids of revolution and used the method of exhaustion to calculate the area under the arc of a parabola with the summation of an infinite series, in a manner not too dissimilar from modern calculus.
In mathematics, engineering, and manufacturing, a solid of revolution is a solid figure obtained by rotating a plane curve around some straight line (the axis of revolution) that lies on the same plane.