Matsukura Shigemasa

Matsukura
Matsukura Shigemasa was a Japanese feudal lord of the late Sengoku and early Edo periods.wikipedia
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Shimabara Rebellion

Shimabaraa rebellion blamed on the Christian influencean armed rebellion
He is most famous for being the lord whose domain was the center of the Shimabara Rebellion of 1638. The family headship was passed on to his son Matsukura Katsuie, but as Katsuie continued his father's draconian measures, the peasants and masterless samurai within the domain revolted, igniting the Shimabara Rebellion.
In the wake of the Matsukura clan's construction of a new castle at Shimabara, taxes were drastically raised, which provoked anger from local peasants and rōnin (samurai without masters).

Shimabara Domain

Lord of ShimabaraShimabaraHinoe
He held the title of Bingo no Kami and the Imperial court rank of junior 5th, lower grade (ju-go i no ge). Though he began as a retainer of Tsutsui Sadatsugu of Yamato Province, he became a lord in his own right, acquiring the 60,000 koku Shimabara Domain in Kyushu, in 1600.
In 1614, the Tokugawa Bakufu banned Christianity and replaced Arima Naozumi with Matsukura Shigemasa.

Matsukura Katsuie

The family headship was passed on to his son Matsukura Katsuie, but as Katsuie continued his father's draconian measures, the peasants and masterless samurai within the domain revolted, igniting the Shimabara Rebellion.
As the son of Matsukura Shigemasa, Katsuie was notorious for suppressing Catholics in his domain, setting high taxation and assigning intensive labour to its peasants, later causing the Shimabara Rebellion.

Shimabara Castle

castle at Shimabaracastle town
In 1618, as per the Ikkoku-ichijō (一国一城, "One Castle Per Province") order established by the Tokugawa shogunate, Shigemasa dismantled his two castles of Hara and Hinoe, and began construction on the new Shimabara Castle (also known as the Matsutake Castle).
After the start of the national isolation policy, the Tokugawa Bakufu banned Christianity from 1614 and replaced Arima Naozumi with Matsukura Shigemasa.

Sengoku period

Japan (Sengoku period)SengokuWarring States period
Matsukura Shigemasa was a Japanese feudal lord of the late Sengoku and early Edo periods.

Edo

YedoEdo cityEdo Honmachi
Matsukura Shigemasa was a Japanese feudal lord of the late Sengoku and early Edo periods.

Tsutsui Sadatsugu

Jimyōji SadatsuguSadatsugu
He held the title of Bingo no Kami and the Imperial court rank of junior 5th, lower grade (ju-go i no ge). Though he began as a retainer of Tsutsui Sadatsugu of Yamato Province, he became a lord in his own right, acquiring the 60,000 koku Shimabara Domain in Kyushu, in 1600.

Yamato Province

YamatoYamato plainYamato region
He held the title of Bingo no Kami and the Imperial court rank of junior 5th, lower grade (ju-go i no ge). Though he began as a retainer of Tsutsui Sadatsugu of Yamato Province, he became a lord in his own right, acquiring the 60,000 koku Shimabara Domain in Kyushu, in 1600. Matsukura Shigemasa was born in 1574 in Yamato Province, the son of Matsukura Ukon Shigenobu, a retainer of the Tsutsui clan.

Kyushu

KyūshūKyūshū IslandKyūshū region
He held the title of Bingo no Kami and the Imperial court rank of junior 5th, lower grade (ju-go i no ge). Though he began as a retainer of Tsutsui Sadatsugu of Yamato Province, he became a lord in his own right, acquiring the 60,000 koku Shimabara Domain in Kyushu, in 1600.

Tsutsui clan

Tsutsui
Matsukura Shigemasa was born in 1574 in Yamato Province, the son of Matsukura Ukon Shigenobu, a retainer of the Tsutsui clan. However, following the death of Tsutsui Junkei, the Tsutsui clan was moved to Iga Province, and the Matsukura remained in Yamato, coming under the supervision of the Toyotomi clan.

Tsutsui Junkei

Fujikatsu
However, following the death of Tsutsui Junkei, the Tsutsui clan was moved to Iga Province, and the Matsukura remained in Yamato, coming under the supervision of the Toyotomi clan.

Iga Province

Igaprovince of IgaIga no kuni
However, following the death of Tsutsui Junkei, the Tsutsui clan was moved to Iga Province, and the Matsukura remained in Yamato, coming under the supervision of the Toyotomi clan.

Toyotomi clan

ToyotomiHashiba clanhouse of Toyotomi
However, following the death of Tsutsui Junkei, the Tsutsui clan was moved to Iga Province, and the Matsukura remained in Yamato, coming under the supervision of the Toyotomi clan.

Battle of Sekigahara

SekigaharaSekigahara CampaignBattle at Sekigahara
In 1600 he fought in the Battle of Sekigahara, and for his merits was awarded lordship of Gojo-Futami Castle by Tokugawa Ieyasu.

Tokugawa Ieyasu

Ieyasu TokugawaIeyasuTokugawa
In 1600 he fought in the Battle of Sekigahara, and for his merits was awarded lordship of Gojo-Futami Castle by Tokugawa Ieyasu.

Siege of Osaka

Osaka CampaignOsaka Winter CampaignOsaka
For his meritorious actions in the Tokugawa army at the Domyoji front of the Osaka Summer Campaign, he was awarded an increase in stipend and was transferred in 1616 to Hinoe in Hizen Province, a 43,000 koku domain formerly belonging to Arima Harunobu.

Hizen Province

HizenHishūHizen no kuni
For his meritorious actions in the Tokugawa army at the Domyoji front of the Osaka Summer Campaign, he was awarded an increase in stipend and was transferred in 1616 to Hinoe in Hizen Province, a 43,000 koku domain formerly belonging to Arima Harunobu.

Arima Harunobu

For his meritorious actions in the Tokugawa army at the Domyoji front of the Osaka Summer Campaign, he was awarded an increase in stipend and was transferred in 1616 to Hinoe in Hizen Province, a 43,000 koku domain formerly belonging to Arima Harunobu.

Tokugawa shogunate

TokugawabakufuJapan
In 1618, as per the Ikkoku-ichijō (一国一城, "One Castle Per Province") order established by the Tokugawa shogunate, Shigemasa dismantled his two castles of Hara and Hinoe, and began construction on the new Shimabara Castle (also known as the Matsutake Castle).

Tokugawa Iemitsu

IemitsuIemitsu TokugawaIyemitsu
In 1621, persecutions of Christians began, with mutilation and branding being practices ordered by the ever-tightening restrictions of the shogun Tokugawa Iemitsu.

Luzon

Luzon Islandnorthern LuzonNorth Luzon
Subsequently, Shigemasa had hopes of further hampering the safety of Christians by attacking Luzon, in the Philippines.

Tsuyama Domain

Mori TadamasaTsuyamaLords of Tsuyama
The Matsukura family came to an end when Katsuie was beheaded by Shogunal order, and the Shogunate placed the domain under the care of Mori Nagatsugu (lord of the Tsuyama Domain of Mimasaka Province), before passing it on to the Koriki family, which was transferred in from Hamamatsu, in Tōtōmi Province.

Mimasaka Province

MimasakaMimasaka no kuniSakushū
The Matsukura family came to an end when Katsuie was beheaded by Shogunal order, and the Shogunate placed the domain under the care of Mori Nagatsugu (lord of the Tsuyama Domain of Mimasaka Province), before passing it on to the Koriki family, which was transferred in from Hamamatsu, in Tōtōmi Province.

Tōtōmi Province

TōtōmiTotomiEnshu
The Matsukura family came to an end when Katsuie was beheaded by Shogunal order, and the Shogunate placed the domain under the care of Mori Nagatsugu (lord of the Tsuyama Domain of Mimasaka Province), before passing it on to the Koriki family, which was transferred in from Hamamatsu, in Tōtōmi Province.

Amakusa 1637

The son of Matsukura Shigemasa. Daimyō of Shimabara, renowned for his cruelty.