Matthew III Csák

Matthew CsákMáté Csák IIIMatthew IIIMáté CsákMatthew '''CsákMatthias CsákMatúš Čák TrenčianskýMáté
Máté Csák or Matthew III Csák (between 1260 and 1265 – 18 March 1321; Csák (III) Máté, Matúš Čák III), also Máté Csák of Trencsén (trencséni Csák (III.) Máté, Matúš Čák III Trenčiansky), was a Hungarian oligarch who ruled de facto independently the north-western counties of Medieval Hungary (today roughly the western half of present-day Slovakia and parts of Northern Hungary).wikipedia
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Peter I Csák

Peter CsákPeter IPeter
He was a son of the Palatine Peter I Csák, a member of the Hungarian genus ("clan") Csák.
His son and heir was the oligarch Matthew III Csák, who, based on his father and uncles' acquisitions, became the de facto ruler of his domain independently of the king and usurped royal prerogatives on his territories.

Charles I of Hungary

Charles ICharles RobertCharles I Robert
He could maintain his rule over his territories even after his defeat at the Battle of Rozgony against King Charles I of Hungary.
After the death of the most powerful oligarch, Matthew Csák, in 1321, Charles became the undisputed ruler of the whole kingdom, with the exception of Croatia where local noblemen were able to preserve their autonomous status.

Stephen I Csák

Stephen IStephen Csák
At about that time, they also inherited their uncles' (Matthew II and Stephen I Csák) possessions around Nagytapolcsány (Slovak: Veľké Topoľčany, now Topoľčany), Hrussó (Slovak: Hrušovo) and Tata.
His nephew and heir was the oligarch Matthew III Csák, who, based on his uncles' acquisitions, became the de facto ruler of his domain independently of the king and usurped royal prerogatives on his territories.

Matthew II Csák

Matthew CsákMatthew IIMatthew of the Csák clan
At about that time, they also inherited their uncles' (Matthew II and Stephen I Csák) possessions around Nagytapolcsány (Slovak: Veľké Topoľčany, now Topoľčany), Hrussó (Slovak: Hrušovo) and Tata.
His nephew and heir was the oligarch Matthew III Csák, who, based on his uncles' acquisitions, became the de facto ruler of his domain independently of the king and usurped royal prerogatives on his territories.

Topoľčany

TopolcanyTapolcsányGross-Tapolcsány
At about that time, they also inherited their uncles' (Matthew II and Stephen I Csák) possessions around Nagytapolcsány (Slovak: Veľké Topoľčany, now Topoľčany), Hrussó (Slovak: Hrušovo) and Tata.
During the 12th and 13th centuries, Topoľčany was owned by the Csak family, its best-known member being Matthew III Csák.

Csák (genus)

Csákgens'' CsákCsáks
He was a son of the Palatine Peter I Csák, a member of the Hungarian genus ("clan") Csák.
The most prominent members of the family were Máté Csák III and Ugrin Csák who were powerful aristocrats of the Kingdom of Hungary from the 1290s.

Battle of Rozgony

Battle of Rozgony / Rozhanovce
He could maintain his rule over his territories even after his defeat at the Battle of Rozgony against King Charles I of Hungary.
Despite many casualties on the King's side, his decisive victory brought an end to the Aba family's rule over the eastern Kingdom of Hungary, weakened his major domestic opponent Máté Csák III, and ultimately secured power for Charles I of Hungary.

Palatine of Hungary

PalatineHungarian Palatinepalatines
He held the offices of master of the horse (főlovászmester) (1293–1296), palatine (nádor) (1296–1297, 1302–1309) and master of the treasury (tárnokmester) (1309–1311).
During the interregnum that followed Andrew III's death, many oligarchs were styled palatines, including Amadeus Aba, Matthew Csák and Stephen Ákos.

Trenčín

TrencinTrencsénLaugaricio
Around the end of 1296, Matthew acquired Trencsén (Slovak: Trenčín) and afterwards, he was named after the castle.
In 1263 Trenčín was in the possession of Jakab Cseszneky royal swordbearer, but in 1302 King Wenceslas I took it away from the Cseszneky brothers because they were supporting his rival Charles Robert, and donated it to Matthew III Csák.

Agnes of Austria (1281–1364)

Agnes of AustriaAgnesAgnes of Hungary
At the same time, the king granted Pozsony County to his queen, Agnes of Austria.
Afterwards, with his father-in-law's support, Andrew managed to defeat the revolt of Miklós Kőszegi and Máté Csák III, and occupy the castles of Kőszeg and Pozsony.

Bratislava Castle

Pozsony CastlecastlePressburg Castle
Following Peter's death, the members of the rival Kőszegi family from the Héder clan strengthened in Pozsony and Sopron Counties taking advantage of that the Csák clan has been weakened due to the death of Matthew II and Peter I. The Kőszegis defeated the local Osl clan in Sopron County and also forged ahead to Pozsony County where captured Pozsony Castle for a short time.
Shortly afterwards, 1287–1291, the Austrian duke Albert of Habsburg, supporting Nicholas, occupied the castle, but was defeated by Matthew III Csák, who was made county head of Pozsony county for this.

Bearer of the sword (Hungary)

bearer of the swordofficeroyal sword-bearer
Around 1283, Matthew and his brother, Csák, who later served as bearer of the sword (kardhordó) in 1293, inherited their father's possessions, Komárom (Slovak: Komárno) and Szenic (Slovak: Senica).

Wenceslaus II of Bohemia

Wenceslaus IIWenceslas IIKing Wenceslas II
In 1298, King Andrew III allied himself with King Wenceslaus II of Bohemia; the alliance was probably directed against Matthew whose possessions lay between the two monarchs' territories.
At that time the Kingdom of Hungary was split into several de facto principalities, and young Wenceslaus was only accepted as the King of Hungary by the rulers in Upper Hungary (Matthew III Csák), in modern day Burgenland (the Güssings [Kőszegis]) and on territory around the capital, Buda.

Holíč

HolicsHoličHolitsch
The Czech armies defeated his troops (whom he encouraged in Hungarian language) at Holics but they could not occupy the fortress.
Among the owners of the town were Matthias Csák and Stibor of Stiborice.

Andrew III of Hungary

Andrew IIIAndrew the VenetianAndrew
In 1291, Matthew took part in the campaign of King Andrew III of Hungary against Austria.
Matthew III Csák, whom Andrew had made palatine in 1296, turned against Andrew at the end of 1297.

Dominic II Rátót

Dominic RátótDominic IIDomonkos
According to a royal charter issued in September 1315, Charles I deprived three of the oligarch's servients of all their possessions and gave those to Palatine Dominic Rátót, because they absolutely supported Matthew Csák's all efforts and did not ask for the king's grace.
In this capacity, he had various conflicts with the most powerful oligarch Matthew Csák.

Wenceslaus III of Bohemia

Wenceslaus IIIWenceslausWenceslaus of Bohemia
Following the death of King Andrew III, he became the Neapolitan prince's follower, but shortly afterwards, he joined the party that offered the crown to Wenceslaus, the son of King Wenceslaus II of Bohemia.
Matthew Csák received Nyitra and Trencsén Counties, along with the royal castles and the estates attached to them, in February 1302.

John III, Bishop of Nyitra

John of NyitraJohnIII. János
As a consequence, Bishop John excommunicated him and his followers again.
During his reign, which roughly coincided with the era of feudal anarchy, the diocese of Nyitra was constantly harassed and plundered by the troops of the powerful and greedy oligarch Matthew Csák.

Thomas Szécsényi

ThomasThomas I Szécsényi
During this time Thomas Szécsényi received Hollókő from Charles, who confiscated the land from the Kacsics clan, the disloyal relatives of Thomas.
The son of Farkas from the gens Kacsics, he joined King Charles I against the powerful Matthew III Csák in 1301; therefore, his relatives who followed Csák occupied his inherited possessions in Nógrád County.

Nicholas I Kőszegi

Nicholas KőszegiNicholas INicholas
In the next year, when Nicholas I Kőszegi rebelled against King Andrew III and occupied Pozsony (German: Pressburg, Slovak: Prešporok, today Bratislava) and Detrekő (Slovak Plavecké Podhradie), Matthew managed to reoccupy the castles on behalf of the king.
Subsequently, the royal army recaptured Pressburg and Detrekő with the leadership of Matthew Csák and subdued the rebellion by July.

Ispán

vice-ispánvice-''ispánfőispán
King Andrew appointed him to master of the horse and he also became the ispán (comes) of Pozsony County (1293–1297).
For instance, Matthew Csák ruled over 14 counties in the wider region of the river Váh (Vág, now Slovakia), Ladislaus Kán administered Transylvania, and members of the Kőszegi family ruled in Transdanubia.

Gentile Portino da Montefiore

Gentile Partino
The legate, Cardinal Gentile Portino da Montefiore managed to persuade Matthew to accept King Charles' rule at their meeting in the Pauline Monastery of Kékes (10 November 1308).
Gentile managed to persuade the most powerful oligarch Matthew Csák to accept King Charles' rule at their meeting in the Pauline Monastery of Kékes on 10 November 1308.

Otto III, Duke of Bavaria

Otto of BavariaOttoOtto III
The internal struggles, however, did not end, because on 6 December 1305 a new claimant, Otto III, Duke of Bavaria was crowned King of Hungary.
On 10 October 1307, the magnates presented at the assembly in Rákos proclaimed Charles king, but the most powerful aristocrats (Matthew III Csák, Amadé Aba and Ladislaus Kán) ignored him as well.

Felician Záh

One of these sanctioned nobles was Felician Záh, who later unsuccessfully attempted to assassinate the entire royal family in 1330.
Among them was Matthew Csák, who dominated the northwestern parts of Hungary.

Ivan Kőszegi

IvanIvan '''KőszegiIván Kőszegi
On 10 October 1307, an assembly confirmed King Charles' rule, but Matthew Csák and some other oligarchs (Ladislaus Kán, Ivan and Henry II Kőszegi) absented themselves from the assembly.
While Nicholas fought against the future oligarch, but still a courtly knight, Matthew III Csák in Pozsony County, Ivan was active in Vas and Zala counties.