Maues

Maues/MogaMoga
Maues (Greek: Μαύης; epigraphically ΜΑΥΟΥ Mauou) was the first Indo-Scythian king, ruling from 98/85 to 60/57 BCE.wikipedia
60 Related Articles

Indo-Scythians

Indo-ScythianIndo-Scythian KingdomScythian
Maues (Greek: Μαύης; epigraphically ΜΑΥΟΥ Mauou) was the first Indo-Scythian king, ruling from 98/85 to 60/57 BCE. The Sakas from Sakastan defeated and killed the Parthian king Phraates II in 126 B.C. Indo-Scythians established themselves in the Indus around 88 B.C., during the end of Mithridates II of Parthias reign.
The first Saka king in South Asia was Maues/Moga (1st century BC) who established Saka power in Gandhara, and Indus Valley.

Saka

SakasShakasSacae
The Sakas or Scythians, were nomadic Eastern Iranian people.
The most famous Indo-Scythian king was Maues.

Taxila copper plate

Moga inscriptionCopper plateTaxila
He is first mentioned in the Moga inscription:
It bears an imprecise date: the 5th day of the Macedonian month of Panemos, in the year 78 of king Moga.

Taxila

Takshashilaancient TaxilaTakshasila
This included seizing Taxila in Punjab, and Gandharas capital city Pushkalavati from the Indo-Greek Kingdoms.
The last Greek king of Taxila was overthrown by the Indo-Scythian chief Maues around 90 BCE.

Gandhara

GandhāraGandharanGandahara
This included seizing Taxila in Punjab, and Gandharas capital city Pushkalavati from the Indo-Greek Kingdoms.
The most famous king of the Sakas, Maues, established himself in Gandhara.

Indo-Greek Kingdom

Indo-GreekIndo-GreeksIndo-Greek Kingdoms
This included seizing Taxila in Punjab, and Gandharas capital city Pushkalavati from the Indo-Greek Kingdoms. He invaded India and established Saka hegemony by conquering Indo-Greek territories.
It is now known that 50 years later, the Indo-Scythian Maues was in alliance with the Indo-Greek kings in Taxila, and one of those kings, Artemidoros seems to claim on his coins that he is the son of Maues, although this is now disputed.

Apollodotus II

Apollodotus II SoterApollodotus II the Great
Maues has overstruck coins belonging to Archebius as well as Apollodotus II in Taxila.
Apollodotus' reign possibly began in the Punjab, when the Scythian king Maues ruled in Gandhara and its capital Taxila.

Archebius

Archebios
Maues has overstruck coins belonging to Archebius as well as Apollodotus II in Taxila.
He was probably one of the last Indo-Greek kings before the Saka king Maues conquered Taxila, and a contemporary of Hermaeus in the west.

Artemidoros Aniketos

ArtemidorosArtemidorus
An Indo-Greek king, Artemidoros, also issued coins where he describes himself as "Son of Maues".
His remaining coins generally feature portraits of Artemidoros and Hellenistic deities and are typical of Indo-Greek rulers, but on a coin described by numismatician R. C. Senior, Artemidoros seems to claim to be the son of the Indo-Scythian king Maues.

Menander II

The symbolism of the lion had also been adopted by the Buddhist Indo-Greek king Menander II.
In that case, Menander II ruled remaining Indo-Greek territories in Gandhara after the invasion of Maues.

Greek language

GreekAncient GreekModern Greek
Maues (Greek: Μαύης; epigraphically ΜΑΥΟΥ Mauou) was the first Indo-Scythian king, ruling from 98/85 to 60/57 BCE.

Scythians

ScythianScythoScyth
The Sakas or Scythians, were nomadic Eastern Iranian people.

Iranian peoples

IranianIraniansIranian people
The Sakas or Scythians, were nomadic Eastern Iranian people.

Manusmriti

Manu SmritiManusmṛtiLaws of Manu
Sanskrit texts including the Manusmriti (X,44), Ramayana and Mahabharata mention the Sakas.

Ramayana

RamayanValmiki RamayanaRāmāyaṇa
Sanskrit texts including the Manusmriti (X,44), Ramayana and Mahabharata mention the Sakas.

Mahabharata

MahābhārataMahabharatMahabharatha
Sanskrit texts including the Manusmriti (X,44), Ramayana and Mahabharata mention the Sakas. The Mahabharata (II.32.17) situated the Sakas along with the Pahlavas (Parthians) and Yona (Ionians) in the north-west.

Pahlavas

PahlavaThe PahlavasParasika
The Mahabharata (II.32.17) situated the Sakas along with the Pahlavas (Parthians) and Yona (Ionians) in the north-west.

Parthia

Parthian EmpireParthian PersiaParthians
The Mahabharata (II.32.17) situated the Sakas along with the Pahlavas (Parthians) and Yona (Ionians) in the north-west.

Yona

YavanaYavanasGreeks
The Mahabharata (II.32.17) situated the Sakas along with the Pahlavas (Parthians) and Yona (Ionians) in the north-west.

Ionians

IonianIonicIonian Greeks
The Mahabharata (II.32.17) situated the Sakas along with the Pahlavas (Parthians) and Yona (Ionians) in the north-west.

Sistan

SakastanSijistanSeistan
The Sakas from Sakastan defeated and killed the Parthian king Phraates II in 126 B.C. Indo-Scythians established themselves in the Indus around 88 B.C., during the end of Mithridates II of Parthias reign.

Phraates II

Phraates II of ParthiaFarhad II
The Sakas from Sakastan defeated and killed the Parthian king Phraates II in 126 B.C. Indo-Scythians established themselves in the Indus around 88 B.C., during the end of Mithridates II of Parthias reign.

Mithridates II of Parthia

Mithridates IIMithridatesMithradates II of Parthia
The Sakas from Sakastan defeated and killed the Parthian king Phraates II in 126 B.C. Indo-Scythians established themselves in the Indus around 88 B.C., during the end of Mithridates II of Parthias reign.

Persian Empire

PersianPersiaPersians
Maues took the title of "Great King of Kings", an exceeded version of a traditional Persian royal title.

Salt Range

salt cliffs Salt Range mountainsKohistan-e-Namak
Mauses is possibly mentioned the Maira inscription in the Salt Range in Pakistan as 'Moasa'.