Maurice Merleau-Ponty

Merleau-PontyMerleau PontyMaurice Merlau-PontyMerleau-Ponty, MauriceMerleau-PonyMerleau‐PontyThe Visible and the Invisible
Maurice Jean Jacques Merleau-Ponty (14 March 1908 – 3 May 1961) was a French phenomenological philosopher, strongly influenced by Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger.wikipedia
339 Related Articles

École normale supérieure (Paris)

École Normale SupérieureÉcole NormaleEcole Normale Superieure
After secondary schooling at the lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris, Merleau-Ponty became a student at the École Normale Supérieure, where he studied alongside Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Simone Weil, and Jean Hyppolite.
The school has achieved particular recognition in the fields of mathematics and physics as one of France's foremost scientific training grounds, along with notability in the human sciences as the spiritual birthplace of authors such as Julien Gracq, Jean Giraudoux, Assia Djebar, and Charles Péguy, philosophers such as Henri Bergson, Jean-Paul Sartre, Louis Althusser, Simone Weil, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Alain Badiou, social scientists such as Émile Durkheim, Raymond Aron, and Pierre Bourdieu, and "French theorists" such as Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida.

Phenomenology of Perception

Phénoménologie de la Perception
He then in 1935 became a tutor at the École Normale Supérieure, where he was awarded his doctorate on the basis of two important books: La structure du comportement (1942) and Phénoménologie de la Perception (1945).
Phenomenology of Perception (Phénoménologie de la perception) is a 1945 book by the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty, in which the author expounds his thesis of "the primacy of perception".

Jean-Paul Sartre

SartreJean Paul SartreJean-Paul Satre
After secondary schooling at the lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris, Merleau-Ponty became a student at the École Normale Supérieure, where he studied alongside Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Simone Weil, and Jean Hyppolite. He was on the editorial board of Les Temps modernes, the leftist magazine established by Jean-Paul Sartre in 1945.
After coming back to Paris in May 1941, he participated in the founding of the underground group Socialisme et Liberté ("Socialism and Liberty") with other writers Simone de Beauvoir, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jean-Toussaint Desanti, Dominique Desanti, Jean Kanapa, and École Normale students.

Western Marxism

Western MarxistWestern Marxist philosophyWestern Marxists
In his earlier work, Merleau-Ponty supported Soviet communism while remaining critical of Soviet policies and Marxism in general, adopting a skeptical stance which he termed Western Marxism.
The phrase "Western Marxism" was coined in 1953 by Maurice Merleau-Ponty.

Collège de France

College de FranceCollège RoyalCollege of France
He was awarded the Chair of Philosophy at the Collège de France from 1952 until his death in 1961, making him the youngest person to have been elected to a Chair.
The motto of the Collège is Docet Omnia, Latin for "It teaches everything"; its goal is to "teach science in the making" and can be best summed up by Maurice Merleau-Ponty's phrase: "Not acquired truths, but the idea of freely-executed research" which is inscribed in golden letters above the main hall.

Simone de Beauvoir

de BeauvoirBeauvoirSimone-de-Beauvoir
After secondary schooling at the lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris, Merleau-Ponty became a student at the École Normale Supérieure, where he studied alongside Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Simone Weil, and Jean Hyppolite.
De Beauvoir first worked with Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Claude Lévi-Strauss, when all three completed their practice teaching requirements at the same secondary school.

Claude Lefort

Lefort
Merleau-Ponty died suddenly of a stroke in 1961 at age 53, apparently while preparing for a class on René Descartes, leaving an unfinished manuscript which was posthumously published in 1964, along with a selection of Merleau-Ponty's working notes, by Claude Lefort as The Visible and the Invisible.
He was politically active by 1942 under the influence of his tutor, the phenomenologist Maurice Merleau-Ponty (whose posthumous publications Lefort later edited).

Les Temps modernes

Temps Modernes
He was on the editorial board of Les Temps modernes, the leftist magazine established by Jean-Paul Sartre in 1945.
The first editorial board consisted of Sartre (director), Raymond Aron, Simone de Beauvoir, Michel Leiris, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Albert Ollivier, and Jean Paulhan.

Marxism

MarxistMarxistsMarxist ideology
In his earlier work, Merleau-Ponty supported Soviet communism while remaining critical of Soviet policies and Marxism in general, adopting a skeptical stance which he termed Western Marxism.
Some notable Marxist aestheticians include Anatoly Lunacharsky, Mikhail Lifshitz, William Morris, Theodor W. Adorno, Bertolt Brecht, Herbert Marcuse, Walter Benjamin, Antonio Gramsci, Georg Lukács, Ernst Fischer, Louis Althusser, Jacques Rancière, Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Raymond Williams.

Edmund Husserl

HusserlHusserlianEdmund Huesserl
Maurice Jean Jacques Merleau-Ponty (14 March 1908 – 3 May 1961) was a French phenomenological philosopher, strongly influenced by Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger.
Maurice Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Perception is influenced by Edmund Husserl's work on perception, intersubjectivity, intentionality, space, and temporality, including Husserl's theory of retention and protention.

Lycée Louis-le-Grand

Collège de ClermontCollège Louis-le-GrandLouis-le-Grand
After secondary schooling at the lycée Louis-le-Grand in Paris, Merleau-Ponty became a student at the École Normale Supérieure, where he studied alongside Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Simone Weil, and Jean Hyppolite.

Moscow Trials

Moscow Show TrialsMoscow Trialshow trials
His endorsement of the Soviet show trials and prison camps was published as Humanism and Terror in 1947, though he would later denounce Soviet terror as being counter to the purportedly humanist aims of the revolution.
Bukharin's confession in particular became the subject of much debate among Western observers, inspiring Koestler's novel Darkness at Noon and a philosophical essay by Maurice Merleau-Ponty in Humanism and Terror among others.

Lifeworld

Lebensweltlife-world
According to Merleau-Ponty, perception has an active dimension, in that it is a primordial openness to the lifeworld (the "Lebenswelt").
The concept was further developed by students of Husserl such as Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Jan Patočka, and Alfred Schütz.

Rochefort, Charente-Maritime

RochefortRochefort-sur-MerRochfort
Maurice Merleau-Ponty was born in 1908 in Rochefort-sur-Mer, Charente-Maritime, France.

Embodied cognition

embodimentembodiedembodied philosophy
With the publication in 1991 of The Embodied Mind by Francisco Varela, Evan Thompson, and Eleanor Rosch, this association was extended, if only partially, to another strand of "anti-cognitivist" or post-representationalist cognitive science: embodied or enactive cognitive science, and later in the decade, to neurophenomenology.
José Ortega y Gasset, George Santayana, Miguel de Unamuno, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Martin Heidegger and others in the broadly existential tradition have proposed philosophies of mind influencing the development of the modern 'embodiment' thesis.

Postcognitivism

post-cognitivistpost-cognitivismpostcognitivist
Despite, or perhaps because of, this view, his work influenced and anticipated the strands of modern psychology known as post-cognitivism.
Their work carries forward some of the work of Martin Heidegger, Jean Piaget, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Lev Vygotsky and others.

Phenomenology (philosophy)

phenomenologyphenomenologicalphenomenologist
Maurice Jean Jacques Merleau-Ponty (14 March 1908 – 3 May 1961) was a French phenomenological philosopher, strongly influenced by Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger.
Husserl's conception of phenomenology has been criticized and developed not only by himself but also by students such as Edith Stein and Roman Ingarden, by hermeneutic philosophers such as Martin Heidegger, by existentialists such as Nicolai Hartmann, Gabriel Marcel, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and Jean-Paul Sartre, by other philosophers such as Max Scheler, Paul Ricoeur, Jean-Luc Marion, Michel Henry, Emmanuel Levinas, Jacques Derrida, and by sociologists such as Alfred Schütz and Eric Voegelin.

Hubert Dreyfus

Dreyfus, HubertHubert L. DreyfusHubert Lederer Dreyfus
Hubert Dreyfus has been instrumental in emphasising the relevance of Merleau-Ponty's work to current post-cognitive research, and its criticism of the traditional view of cognitive science.
(Due to his knowledge of Husserl, Dagfinn Føllesdal sat on the thesis committee but he has asserted that Dreyfus "was not really my student.") That same year, his co-translation (with his first wife) of Sense and Non-Sense by Merleau-Ponty was published.

Throwing Like a Girl

Throwing Like a Girl: A Phenomenology of Feminine Body Comportment Motility and Spatiality
Merleau-Ponty's phenomenology of the body has also been taken up by Iris Young in her essay "[[Throwing Like a Girl: A Phenomenology of Feminine Body Comportment Motility and Spatiality|Throwing Like a Girl]]," and its follow-up, "'Throwing Like a Girl': Twenty Years Later."
Young's essay uses ideas from philosophers Simone de Beauvoir and Maurice Merleau-Ponty to examine how perceptions of the female body relate to task performance and confidence.

Martin Heidegger

HeideggerHeideggerianHeidegger, Martin
Maurice Jean Jacques Merleau-Ponty (14 March 1908 – 3 May 1961) was a French phenomenological philosopher, strongly influenced by Edmund Husserl and Martin Heidegger.
Some questions raised about Heidegger's philosophy include the priority of ontology, the status of animals, the nature of the religious, Heidegger's supposed neglect of ethics (Levinas), the body (Maurice Merleau-Ponty), sexual difference (Luce Irigaray), or space (Peter Sloterdijk).

Alphonso Lingis

His doctoral dissertation, written under Alphonse de Waelhens, was a discussion of the French phenomenologists Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Jean-Paul Sartre.

Paul Cézanne

CézanneCezannePaul Cezanne
In his essay "Cézanne's Doubt", in which he identifies Paul Cézanne's impressionistic theory of painting as analogous to his own concept of radical reflection, the attempt to return to, and reflect on, prereflective consciousness, Merleau-Ponty identifies science as the opposite of art.
Cézanne's stylistic approaches and beliefs regarding how to paint were analyzed and written about by the French philosopher Maurice Merleau-Ponty who is primarily known for his association with phenomenology and existentialism.

Renaud Barbaras

Barbaras
A phenomenologist, his works have primarily focused on the philosophies of Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty.

Invagination (philosophy)

Invagination
It was first used by Maurice Merleau-Ponty (invagination) to describe the dynamic self-differentiation of the 'flesh'.

Xavier Tilliette

Tilliette, X.Tilliette, Xavier
He was also a specialist of Claudel, of phenomenology (Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty), and of German idealism.