Max Fleischer

MaxMax Fleischer (animator)FleischerFleischer brothersM. Fleisch.Max Fleischer Cartoons
Max Fleischer (born Majer Fleischer ; July 19, 1883 – September 25, 1972) was an American animator, inventor, film director and producer and studio founder and owner.wikipedia
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Fleischer Studios

Fleischer BrothersFleischerInkwell Studios
Born in Kraków, Fleischer emigrated to the US where he became a pioneer in the development of the animated cartoon and served as the head of Fleischer Studios, which he co-founded with his younger brother Dave.
It was founded in 1921 as Out of the Inkwell, inc. by brothers Max Fleischer and Dave Fleischer who ran the pioneering company from its inception until Paramount Pictures, the studio's parent company and the distributor of its films, acquired ownership.

Dave Fleischer

Dave
Born in Kraków, Fleischer emigrated to the US where he became a pioneer in the development of the animated cartoon and served as the head of Fleischer Studios, which he co-founded with his younger brother Dave.
David Fleischer (July 14, 1894 – June 25, 1979) was an American film director and producer, best known as a co-owner of Fleischer Studios with his older brother Max Fleischer.

Betty Boop

Pudgy the PuppyBaby (Betty) Boopeponymous character
He brought such animated characters as Koko the Clown, Betty Boop, Popeye, and Superman to the movie screen and was responsible for a number of technological innovations including the Rotoscope, the "Bouncing Ball" song films, and the "Stereoptical Process". Max Fleischer's most famous character, Betty Boop, was born out of a cameo caricature in the early Talkartoon, Dizzy Dishes (1930).
Betty Boop is an animated cartoon character created by Max Fleischer, with help from animators including Grim Natwick.

Koko the Clown

Inkwell ImpsKo-Ko the ClownKoko
He brought such animated characters as Koko the Clown, Betty Boop, Popeye, and Superman to the movie screen and was responsible for a number of technological innovations including the Rotoscope, the "Bouncing Ball" song films, and the "Stereoptical Process".
Koko the Clown is an animated character created by animation pioneer Max Fleischer.

Richard Fleischer

FleischerRichard FleisherRichard O. Fleischer
Film director Richard Fleischer was his son.
Richard Fleischer was born to a Jewish family in Brooklyn, the son of Essie (née Goldstein) and animator/producer Max Fleischer, a native of Kraków, Poland.

History of animation

animated cartoonanimatedcartoons
Born in Kraków, Fleischer emigrated to the US where he became a pioneer in the development of the animated cartoon and served as the head of Fleischer Studios, which he co-founded with his younger brother Dave.
Many aspiring cartoonists started their careers at Bray, including Paul Terry (later of Heckle and Jeckle fame), Max Fleischer (later of Betty Boop and Popeye fame), and Walter Lantz (later of Woody Woodpecker fame).

Rotoscoping

rotoscoperotoscopedrotoscoped animation
He brought such animated characters as Koko the Clown, Betty Boop, Popeye, and Superman to the movie screen and was responsible for a number of technological innovations including the Rotoscope, the "Bouncing Ball" song films, and the "Stereoptical Process". This device, known as the rotoscope, enabled Fleischer to produce the first realistic animation since the initial works of Winsor McCay.
This projection equipment is referred to as a rotoscope, developed by Polish-American animator Max Fleischer.

Song Car-Tunes

Ko-Ko Song Car-TunesSong Car-TuneSong Cartunes
During this period, Fleischer invented the "Follow the Bouncing Ball" technique in his Ko-Ko Song Car-Tunes series of animated sing-along shorts.
Ko-Ko Song Car-Tunes, Song Car-Tunes, or (some sources erroneously say) Sound Car-Tunes, is a series of short three-minute animation films produced by Max Fleischer and Dave Fleischer between May 1924 and September 1927, pioneering the use of the "Follow the Bouncing Ball" device used to lead audiences in theater sing-alongs.

My Old Kentucky Home (1926 film)

My Old Kentucky HomeMy Old Kentucky Home'' (1926 film)Song Car-Tune "My Old Kentucky Home
Of the 36 Song Car-Tunes 12 used the deForest Phonofilm sound-on-film process, the first of which was My Old Kentucky Home in 1926.
My Old Kentucky Home is a short animation film originally released in June 1926, by Max and Dave Fleischer of Fleischer Studios as one of the Song Car-Tunes series.

Hugo Riesenfeld

Red Seal Pictures
In 1924, Fleischer partnered with Edwin Miles Fadiman, Hugo Riesenfeld and Lee DeForest to form Red Seal Pictures Corporation, which owned 36 theaters on the East Coast, extending as far west as Cleveland, Ohio.
In May 1926, Max Fleischerbegan producing a series of sound versions of their popular "Bouncing Ball" Song Car-Tunes, using the Lee de Forest Phonofilm sound-on-film process.

Bouncing ball (music)

bouncing ballFollow the Bouncing Ballbouncing-ball
During this period, Fleischer invented the "Follow the Bouncing Ball" technique in his Ko-Ko Song Car-Tunes series of animated sing-along shorts.
The bouncing ball technique was invented by Max Fleischer originally for the "Ko-Ko" Song Car-Tunes (1924–1927) and revised in 1929 as Screen Songs (1929–1938) for Paramount.

Talkartoons

TalkartoonAdmission Free
Max Fleischer's most famous character, Betty Boop, was born out of a cameo caricature in the early Talkartoon, Dizzy Dishes (1930).
With the new contract with Paramount Pictures, and without the burden of Red Seal Pictures and Alfred Weiss, Max Fleischer was free to experiment with new, bold ideas.

Phonofilm

DeForest PhonofilmDe Forest Phonofilms
Of the 36 Song Car-Tunes 12 used the deForest Phonofilm sound-on-film process, the first of which was My Old Kentucky Home in 1926.
Max Fleischer and Dave Fleischer used the Phonofilm process for their Song Car-Tunes series of cartoons—all featuring the "Follow the Bouncing Ball" gimmick—starting in May 1924.

Popeye

Popeye the SailorThimble TheatrePopeye the Sailor Man
He brought such animated characters as Koko the Clown, Betty Boop, Popeye, and Superman to the movie screen and was responsible for a number of technological innovations including the Rotoscope, the "Bouncing Ball" song films, and the "Stereoptical Process".
In 1933, Max Fleischer adapted the Thimble Theatre characters into a series of Popeye the Sailor theatrical cartoon shorts for Paramount Pictures.

Winsor McCay

Winsor McKayThe CentaursWindsor McCay
This device, known as the rotoscope, enabled Fleischer to produce the first realistic animation since the initial works of Winsor McCay.
After a considerable amount of drinking, McCay was introduced by animator Max Fleischer.

Brownsville, Brooklyn

BrownsvilleBrownsville, New YorkBrownsville, Brooklyn, New York
His teens were spent in Brownsville, a poor Jewish neighborhood in Brooklyn.

Grim Natwick

Myron "Grim" NatwickGrim" NatwickMyron Natwick
While she originated under veteran animator Myron "Grim" Natwick, she was transformed into a human female under Seymour Kneitel and Berny Wolf and became Fleischer's biggest character.
Natwick is best known for drawing the Fleischer Studio's most popular character, Betty Boop, under the direction of Max Fleischer.

Steamboat Willie

Timeless River
This preceded Walt Disney's Steamboat Willie (1928), which has been erroneously cited for decades as the first cartoon to synchronize sound with animation.
Starting in May 1924 and continuing through September 1926, Dave and Max Fleischer's Inkwell Studios produced 19 sound cartoons, part of the Song Car-Tunes series, using the Phonofilm sound-on-film process.

Poor Cinderella

The first entry, Poor Cinderella (1934) was made in the two-emulsion/two color Cinecolor Process and starred Betty Boop in her only color appearance.
Final animated short presented by Max Fleischer and at Fleischer Studios.

Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor

This technique was used to the greatest degree in the two-reel Popeye Features Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor (1936) and Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba's Forty Thieves (1937).
It was produced by Max Fleischer for Fleischer Studios, Inc. and directed by Dave Fleischer, with the title song by Sammy Timberg.

Lee de Forest

Lee DeForestDeForestDe Forest
In 1924, Fleischer partnered with Edwin Miles Fadiman, Hugo Riesenfeld and Lee DeForest to form Red Seal Pictures Corporation, which owned 36 theaters on the East Coast, extending as far west as Cleveland, Ohio.
Starting in May 1924, Max and Dave Fleischer used the Phonofilm process for their Song Car-Tune series of cartoons—featuring the "Follow the Bouncing Ball" gimmick.

Gulliver's Travels (1939 film)

Gulliver's Travels1939Gulliver's Travels'' (1939 film)
Jonathan Swift's classic, Gulliver's Travels, was a favorite of Max's and pressed into production.
Gulliver's Travels is a 1939 American cel-animated Technicolor feature film produced by Max Fleischer and directed by Dave Fleischer for Fleischer Studios.

Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba's Forty Thieves

This technique was used to the greatest degree in the two-reel Popeye Features Popeye the Sailor Meets Sindbad the Sailor (1936) and Popeye the Sailor Meets Ali Baba's Forty Thieves (1937).
It was produced by Max Fleischer for Fleischer Studios, Inc. and directed by Dave Fleischer.

The Sidewalks of New York

Sidewalks of New YorkOn the Sidewalks of New YorkSidewalks of New York Mambo
In spite of the conflicts with Weiss, Fleischer managed to negotiate a new contract with Paramount to produce a revised version of the "Song Car-tunes", renamed Screen Songs, produced with sound beginning with The Sidewalks of New York.
Max Fleischer and his brother Dave Fleischer made a cartoon The Sidewalks of New York with the song in 1925, using the DeForest Phonofilm sound-on-film process.

Mr. Bug Goes to Town

Mister Bug Goes to TownHoppity Goes to Town
This second feature, Mr. Bug Goes to Town, was unique, having a contemporary setting and was technically superior to Gulliver's Travels.
The film was produced by Max Fleischer and directed by Dave Fleischer and Shamus Culhane, with animation sequences directed by Willard Bowsky, Culhane, H.C. Ellison, Thomas Johnson, Graham Place, Stan Quackenbush, David Tendlar, and Myron Waldman.