Society's logo
Max Planck, after whom the society is named.
King George II, founder and president of the university
Entrance of the administrative headquarters of the Max Planck Society in Munich
King George II in the Pauliner Church in 1748
Alte Aula (Great Hall), also Karzer, at Wilhelmsplatz (built in 1835–1837)
The interior of the university Aula
Sign at Göttingen train station displaying the motto Stadt, die Wissen schafft ("City that creates knowledge", playing also with the German word "Wissenschaft", English "science").
Central Library and "Raumskulptur" sculpture
The old Auditorium Maximum (built in 1826–1865)
Traditional Observatory of the university
The Pauliner Church, once the seat of the University Library in which Heinrich Heine, the Brothers Grimm, and Goethe worked
The Alte Mensa
Carl Friedrich Gauss
Bernhard Riemann
David Hilbert
Felix Klein
Constantin Carathéodory
Peter Gustav Lejeune Dirichlet
J. Robert Oppenheimer
Friedrich Wöhler
Heinrich Heine
Brothers Grimm
Arthur Schopenhauer
Rudolf von Jhering
Otto von Bismarck
Richard von Weizsäcker
Gerhard Schröder
Max Weber
Jürgen Habermas
John von Neumann
Gottlieb Burckhardt
Rudolph Sohm
William Graham Sumner
Emmy Noether
Edward Teller
August Weismann
Emil Wiechert
Arnold Sommerfeld
Ludwig Prandtl
Theodore von Kármán
J.P. Morgan
Maria Goeppert-Mayer physicist
Hsu Tzong-Li Chief Justice & President of Judicial Yuan Taiwan
R. G. Bhandarkar Orientalist
Karl Heinrich Ulrichs pioneer of the gay rights movement

Furthermore, the university maintains strong connections with major research institutes based in Göttingen, such as those of the Max Planck Society and the Leibniz Association.

- University of Göttingen

International Max Planck Research School for Solar System Science at the University of Göttingen hosted by MPI for Solar System Research

- Max Planck Society

5 related topics

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Planck in 1933

Max Planck

German theoretical physicist whose discovery of energy quanta won him the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918.

German theoretical physicist whose discovery of energy quanta won him the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918.

Planck in 1933
Max Planck's signature at ten years of age
A side portrait of Planck as a young adult, c. 1878
Plaque at the Humboldt University of Berlin: "Max Planck, discoverer of the elementary quantum of action h, taught in this building from 1889 to 1928."
Planck in 1918, the year he received the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on quantum theory
From left to right: W. Nernst, A. Einstein, Planck, R.A. Millikan and von Laue at a dinner given by von Laue in Berlin on 11 November 1931
Planck's grave in Göttingen
Vorlesungen über die Theorie der Wärmestrahlung, 1906

In 1948, the German scientific institution Kaiser Wilhelm Society (of which Planck was twice president) was renamed Max Planck Society (MPG).

His paternal great-grandfather and grandfather were both theology professors in Göttingen; his father was a law professor at the University of Kiel and Munich.

Former Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut for Chemistry in Berlin, the place at which nuclear fission was first detected

Kaiser Wilhelm Society

German scientific institution established in the German Empire in 1911.

German scientific institution established in the German Empire in 1911.

Former Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut for Chemistry in Berlin, the place at which nuclear fission was first detected
Former Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut for Biology, Berlin
Opening of the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Institut in Berlin-Dahlem, 1913. From right: Adolf von Harnack, Friedrich von Ilberg, Kaiser Wilhelm II, Carl Neuberg, August von Trott zu Solz

Its functions were taken over by the Max Planck Society.

The physicist Howard Percy Robertson was director of the department for science in the British Zone; he had a National Research Council Fellowship in the 1920s to study at the Georg August University of Göttingen and the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich.

Habermas in 2014

Jürgen Habermas

German philosopher and sociologist in the tradition of critical theory and pragmatism.

German philosopher and sociologist in the tradition of critical theory and pragmatism.

Habermas in 2014

He studied at the universities of Göttingen (1949/50), Zurich (1950/51), and Bonn (1951–54) and earned a doctorate in philosophy from Bonn in 1954 with a dissertation written on the conflict between the absolute and history in Schelling's thought, entitled, ''Das Absolute und die Geschichte.

He accepted the position of Director of the Max Planck Institute for the Study of the Scientific-Technical World in Starnberg (near Munich) in 1971, and worked there until 1983, two years after the publication of his magnum opus, The Theory of Communicative Action.

Heisenberg in 1933

Werner Heisenberg

German theoretical physicist and one of the key pioneers of quantum mechanics.

German theoretical physicist and one of the key pioneers of quantum mechanics.

Heisenberg in 1933
Heisenberg in 1924
A visual representation of an induced nuclear fission event where a slow-moving neutron is absorbed by the nucleus of a uranium-235 atom, which fissions into two fast-moving lighter elements (fission products) and additional neutrons. Most of the energy released is in the form of the kinetic velocities of the fission products and the neutrons.
Replica of the German experimental nuclear reactor captured and dismantled at Haigerloch
Bust of Heisenberg in his old age, on display at the Max Planck Society campus in Garching bei München

From 1920 to 1923, he studied physics and mathematics at the Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich under Arnold Sommerfeld and Wilhelm Wien and at the Georg-August University of Göttingen with Max Born and James Franck and mathematics with David Hilbert.

Following the Kaiser Wilhelm Society's obliteration by the Allied Control Council and the establishment of the Max Planck Society in the British zone, Heisenberg became the director of the Max Planck Institute for Physics.

Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research

Research institute in astronomy and astrophysics located in Göttingen, Germany, where it relocated in February 2014 from the nearby village of Lindau.

Research institute in astronomy and astrophysics located in Göttingen, Germany, where it relocated in February 2014 from the nearby village of Lindau.

New Institute building in Göttingen, built in 2013 and occupied in 2014.
Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research – April 2006
Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Lindau, about a year before relocating – March 2013.
Prof. Ulrich Christensen (left), Prof. Dr. Laurent Gizon (centre) and Prof. Dr. Sami K. Solanki (right)

MPS is a part of the Max Planck Society, which operates 80 research facilities in Germany.

The MPI for Solar System Research offers the PhD programme "International Max Planck Research School (IMPRS) for Solar System Science" together with the University of Göttingen.