Max Weber

WeberWeberianWeber, Max[Max] WeberEconomicsKarl Emil Maximilian WeberMaxMax Weber’ssociologistthe Weberian model of bureaucracy
Maximilian Karl Emil Weber (21 April 1864 – 14 June 1920) was a German sociologist, philosopher, jurist, and political economist.wikipedia
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Émile Durkheim

DurkheimEmile DurkheimDurkheimian
Weber is often cited, with Émile Durkheim and Karl Marx, as among the three founders of sociology.
He formally established the academic discipline of sociology and—with W. E. B. Du Bois, Karl Marx and Max Weber—is commonly cited as the principal architect of modern social science.

The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism

famous claimProtestant EthicsThe Protestant Ethic
Weber is best known for his thesis combining economic sociology and the sociology of religion, elaborated in his book The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, in which he proposed that ascetic Protestantism was one of the major "elective affinities" associated with the rise in the Western world of market-driven capitalism and the rational-legal nation-state.
The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (Die protestantische Ethik und der Geist des Kapitalismus) is a book written by Max Weber, a German sociologist, economist, and politician.

Verstehen

interpretative sociologyinterpretivetruth above positivism
Weber was a key proponent of methodological anti-positivism, arguing for the study of social action through interpretive (rather than purely empiricist) means, based on understanding the purpose and meaning that individuals attach to their own actions.
The term is closely associated with the work of the German sociologist, Max Weber, whose antipositivism established an alternative to prior sociological positivism and economic determinism, rooted in the analysis of social action.

The Religion of China

The Religion of China: Confucianism and TaoismChinesehis 1920 treatment of the religion in China
The Protestant Ethic formed the earliest part in Weber's broader investigations into world religion; he went on to examine the religions of China, the religions of India and ancient Judaism, with particular regard to their differing economic consequences and conditions of social stratification.
The Religion of China: Confucianism and Taoism is a book written by Max Weber, a German economist and sociologist.

State (polity)

statestatesthe state
In another major work, "Politics as a Vocation", Weber defined the state as an entity that successfully claims a "monopoly of the legitimate use of physical force within a given territory".
Max Weber's definition of a state as a polity that maintains a monopoly on the use of violence is widely used, as are many others.

Sociology of religion

sociologist of religionsociologists of religionreligion
Weber is best known for his thesis combining economic sociology and the sociology of religion, elaborated in his book The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, in which he proposed that ascetic Protestantism was one of the major "elective affinities" associated with the rise in the Western world of market-driven capitalism and the rational-legal nation-state.
The works of Karl Marx and Max Weber emphasized the relationship between religion and the economic or social structure of society.

Social actions

social actionpolitical actionaction
Weber was a key proponent of methodological anti-positivism, arguing for the study of social action through interpretive (rather than purely empiricist) means, based on understanding the purpose and meaning that individuals attach to their own actions.
According to Max Weber, "an Action is 'social' if the acting individual takes account of the behavior of others and is thereby oriented in its course".

The Religion of India

The Religion of India: The Sociology of Hinduism and BuddhismIndiareligions of India
The Protestant Ethic formed the earliest part in Weber's broader investigations into world religion; he went on to examine the religions of China, the religions of India and ancient Judaism, with particular regard to their differing economic consequences and conditions of social stratification.
The Religion of India: The Sociology of Hinduism and Buddhism is a book on the sociology of religion written by Max Weber, a German economist and sociologist of the early twentieth century.

Politics as a Vocation

ethic of ultimate ends' and an 'ethic of responsibility
In another major work, "Politics as a Vocation", Weber defined the state as an entity that successfully claims a "monopoly of the legitimate use of physical force within a given territory".
"Politics as a Vocation" (Politik als Beruf) is an essay by German economist and sociologist Max Weber (1864–1920).

Secularization

secularisationsecularizedsecularised
Weber's main intellectual concern was understanding the processes of rationalisation, secularisation, and "disenchantment", which he associated with the rise of capitalism and modernity.
Social theorists such as Karl Marx (1818-1883), Sigmund Freud (1856-1939), Max Weber (1864-1920), and Émile Durkheim (1858-1917) postulated that the modernization of society would include a decline in levels of religiosity.

Charismatic authority

charismatic leadercharismatic leadershipcharismatic
He was also the first to categorise social authority into distinct forms, which he labelled as charismatic, traditional, and rational-legal.
Charismatic authority is a concept of leadership developed by the German sociologist Max Weber.

Economic sociology

economic sociologistSociety for the Advancement of Socio-Economicsstudy of markets
Weber is best known for his thesis combining economic sociology and the sociology of religion, elaborated in his book The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism, in which he proposed that ascetic Protestantism was one of the major "elective affinities" associated with the rise in the Western world of market-driven capitalism and the rational-legal nation-state.
The specific term "economic sociology" was first coined by William Stanley Jevons in 1879, later to be used in the works of Émile Durkheim, Max Weber and Georg Simmel between 1890 and 1920.

Disenchantment

enchanteddisenchanteddisenchanted world
Weber's main intellectual concern was understanding the processes of rationalisation, secularisation, and "disenchantment", which he associated with the rise of capitalism and modernity.
The term was borrowed from Friedrich Schiller by Max Weber to describe the character of modernized, bureaucratic, secularized Western society, where scientific understanding is more highly valued than belief, and where processes are oriented toward rational goals, as opposed to traditional society, where for Weber, "the world remains a great enchanted garden".

Ancient Judaism (book)

Ancient Judaism
The Protestant Ethic formed the earliest part in Weber's broader investigations into world religion; he went on to examine the religions of China, the religions of India and ancient Judaism, with particular regard to their differing economic consequences and conditions of social stratification.
Ancient Judaism (Das antike Judentum), is an essay written by the German economist and sociologist Max Weber in the early 20th century.

Sociology

sociologistsociologicalsociologists
Maximilian Karl Emil Weber (21 April 1864 – 14 June 1920) was a German sociologist, philosopher, jurist, and political economist.
Durkheim, Marx, and the German theorist Max Weber (1864–1920) are typically cited as the three principal architects of sociology.

Frankfurt School

cultural Marxismcritical theoryThe Frankfurt School
Weber's analysis of modernity and rationalisation significantly influenced the critical theory associated with the Frankfurt School.
The School’s sociologic works derived from syntheses of the thematically pertinent works of Immanuel Kant, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel, and Karl Marx, of Sigmund Freud and Max Weber, and of Georg Simmel and Georg Lukács.

Bureaucracy

bureaucraticbureaucraciesbureaucrat
His analysis of bureaucracy emphasised that modern state institutions are increasingly based on rational-legal authority.
The German sociologist Max Weber argued that bureaucracy constitutes the most efficient and rational way in which human activity can be organized and that systematic processes and organized hierarchies are necessary to maintain order, maximize efficiency, and eliminate favoritism.

Traditional authority

traditional dominationtraditionalTraditional Leadership
He was also the first to categorise social authority into distinct forms, which he labelled as charismatic, traditional, and rational-legal.
In sociology, the concept of traditional authority (domination) comes from Max Weber's tripartite classification of authority, the other two forms being charismatic authority and rational-legal authority.

Erfurt

Erfurt, GermanyKühnhausenBindersleben
Weber was born in 1864, in Erfurt, Province of Saxony, Prussia.
1260–1328), the Baroque composer Johann Pachelbel (1653–1706) and the sociologist Max Weber (1864–1920).

Max Weber Sr.

He was the oldest of the seven children of Max Weber Sr., a wealthy and prominent civil servant and member of the National Liberal Party, and his wife Helene (Fallenstein), who partly descended from French Huguenot immigrants and held strong moral absolutist ideas.
He was the father of the social scientists, Max and Alfred Weber.

Alfred Weber

AlfredWeber
The young Weber and his brother Alfred, who also became a sociologist and economist, thrived in this intellectual atmosphere.
Alfred Weber, younger brother of the well-known sociologist Max Weber, was born in Erfurt and raised in Charlottenburg.

Historical school of economics

Historical SchoolGerman Historical Schoolhistorical school of economic history
In 1888 he joined the Verein für Socialpolitik, a new professional association of German economists affiliated with the historical school, who saw the role of economics primarily as finding solutions to the social problems of the age and who pioneered large scale statistical studies of economic issues.
Prominent leaders included Gustav von Schmoller (1838–1917), and Max Weber (1864–1920) in Germany, and Joseph Schumpeter (1883–1950) in Austria and the United States.

German Democratic Party

DDPDeutsche Demokratische ParteiGerman Democratic Party (DDP)
After the First World War, he was among the founders of the liberal German Democratic Party.
Other well-known politicians of the DDP were Hugo Preuß, the main author of the Weimar Constitution; the eminent sociologist Max Weber and his brother Alfred.

University of Freiburg

FreiburgFreiburg UniversityAlbert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg
The couple moved to Freiburg in 1894, where Weber was appointed professor of economics at the university, before accepting the same position at the University of Heidelberg in 1896.
The University of Freiburg has been associated with figures such as Martin Heidegger, Hannah Arendt, Rudolf Carnap, David Daube, Johann Eck, Hans-Georg Gadamer, Friedrich Hayek, Edmund Husserl, Friedrich Meinecke, Max Weber, Paul Uhlenhuth and Ernst Zermelo.

Marianne Weber

MarianneMarianne Schnitger
Also in 1893 he married his distant cousin Marianne Schnitger, later a feminist activist and author in her own right, who was instrumental in collecting and publishing Weber's journal articles as books after his death, while her biography of him is an important source for understanding Weber's life.
Marianne Weber (born Marianne Schnitger, 2 August 1870 – 12 March 1954) was a German sociologist, women's rights activist and the wife of Max Weber.