Maxentius

Imp. Caesar M. Aurelius Valerius Maxentius AugustusMarcus Aurelius Valerius ''Maxentius'' AugustusMarcus Aurelius Valerius MaxentiusRoman Emperor Maxentius
Maxentius (Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius Augustus; c. 278 – 28 October 312) was Roman Emperor from 306 to 312.wikipedia
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Civil wars of the Tetrarchy

battlescivil warsmoved against Licinius once more
The latter part of his reign was preoccupied with civil war, allying with Maximinus II against Licinius and Constantine.
The Civil wars of the Tetrarchy were a series of conflicts between the co-emperors of the Roman Empire, starting in 306 AD with the usurpation of Maxentius and the defeat of Severus, and ending with the defeat of Licinius at the hands of Constantine I in 324 AD.

Maximian

Maximianus HerculiusEmperor MaximianMaximian Herculeus
He was the son of former Emperor Maximian and the son-in-law of Emperor Galerius. He was the son of the Emperor Maximian and his wife Eutropia.
In late 306, Maximian took the title of Augustus again and aided his son Maxentius' rebellion in Italy.

Licinius

Publius Flavius Galerius Valerius Licinianus LiciniusValerius Licinius320
The latter part of his reign was preoccupied with civil war, allying with Maximinus II against Licinius and Constantine.
He was trusted enough by Galerius that in 307 he was sent as an envoy to Maxentius in Italy to attempt to reach some agreement about the latter's illegitimate political position.

Valeria Maximilla

The exact date of his marriage to Valeria Maximilla, daughter of Galerius, is unknown.
293–312) was the Empress of the Romans and wife of Emperor Maxentius.

Constantine the Great

ConstantineConstantine IEmperor Constantine
The latter part of his reign was preoccupied with civil war, allying with Maximinus II against Licinius and Constantine. Although two sons of emperors were available, Constantine and Maxentius, they were passed over for the new tetrarchy, and Severus and Maximinus Daia were appointed Caesars.
He emerged victorious in a series of civil wars against Emperors Maxentius and Licinius to become sole ruler of both west and east by 324 AD.

Diocletian

Emperor DiocletianDiocletian Reformsreforms
He seems not to have served, however, in any important military or administrative position during the reign of Diocletian and his father.
Although effective while he ruled, Diocletian's tetrarchic system collapsed after his abdication under the competing dynastic claims of Maxentius and Constantine, sons of Maximian and Constantius respectively.

Eutropia

He was the son of the Emperor Maximian and his wife Eutropia.
By Maximian, she had two children, a boy, Maxentius (c. 276-312), who was Western Roman Emperor from 306–312 and a girl, Fausta (c. 290), who was wife of Constantine the Great, and mother of six children by him, including the Augusti Constantine II, Constantius II and Constans.

Valerius Romulus

Marcus Aurelius Valerius Romulus
He had two sons, Valerius Romulus (ca.
Valerius Romulus, also Marcus Aurelius Romulus (c. 295 – 309) was the son of the Caesar and later usurper Maxentius and of Valeria Maximilla, daughter of Emperor Galerius.

Galerius

Emperor GaleriusGaius Galerius Valerius MaximianusGalerius Maximianus
He was the son of former Emperor Maximian and the son-in-law of Emperor Galerius. The exact date of his marriage to Valeria Maximilla, daughter of Galerius, is unknown.
The ambitious spirit of Galerius was only just over this disappointment when he beheld the unexpected loss of Italy to Maxentius, who was married to his daughter Valeria Maximilla.

Maximinus II

MaximinusMaximinus DaiaDaia’s death
The latter part of his reign was preoccupied with civil war, allying with Maximinus II against Licinius and Constantine. Although two sons of emperors were available, Constantine and Maxentius, they were passed over for the new tetrarchy, and Severus and Maximinus Daia were appointed Caesars.
When Licinius and Constantine began to make common cause, Maximinus entered into a secret alliance with the usurper Caesar Maxentius, who controlled Italy.

Circus of Maxentius

Circuschariot racing circusfourth circus
Nearby, Maxentius also constructed the Circus of Maxentius.
The Circus of Maxentius (known until the 19th century as the Circus of Caracalla) is an ancient structure in Rome, Italy; it is part of a complex of buildings erected by emperor Maxentius on the Via Appia between AD 306 and 312.

Domitius Alexander

Lucius Domitius Alexander
Late in 308, Domitius Alexander was acclaimed emperor in Carthage, and the African provinces seceded from Maxentian rule.
Lucius Domitius Alexander (died c. 311), probably born in Phrygia, was vicarius of Africa when Emperor Maxentius ordered him to send his son as hostage to Rome.

Valerius Severus

SeverusSeverus IIFlavius Severus
Although two sons of emperors were available, Constantine and Maxentius, they were passed over for the new tetrarchy, and Severus and Maximinus Daia were appointed Caesars.
When Maxentius, the son of the retired emperor Maximian, revolted at Rome, Galerius sent Severus to suppress the rebellion.

Tetrarchy

tetrarchtetrarchicTetrarchs
Although two sons of emperors were available, Constantine and Maxentius, they were passed over for the new tetrarchy, and Severus and Maximinus Daia were appointed Caesars.
At the same time, Maxentius, the son of Maximian, who also resented being left out of the new arrangements, defeated Severus before forcing him to abdicate and then arranging his murder in 307.

Diocletianic Persecution

persecution of DiocletianGreat Persecutionpersecution
The election of a bishop did not aid much, either, as Diocletian's persecution had split the Italian church into competing factions over the issue of apostasy (see Donatism).
In Italy in 306, the usurper Maxentius ousted Maximian's successor Severus, promising full religious toleration.

Pope Eusebius

Eusebius
He also strengthened his support among the Christians of Italy by allowing them to elect a new Bishop of Rome, Eusebius.
His pontificate lasted four months, after which, in consequence of disturbances within the Church which led to acts of violence, he was banished by the emperor Maxentius, who had been the ruler of Rome since 306, and had at first shown himself friendly to the Christians.

Praetorian Guard

praetorianPraetoriansPraetorian cohorts
When rumours reached the capital that the emperors tried to subject the Roman population to the capitation tax, like every other city of the empire, and wanted to dissolve the remains of the Praetorian Guard which were still stationed at Rome, riots broke out.
In response, the Praetorians turned to Maxentius, the son of the retired emperor Maximian, and proclaimed him their emperor on 28 October 306.

Battle of the Milvian Bridge

Milvian Bridgebattle of Milvian BridgeBattle of Ponte Milvio
The latter defeated him at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge in 312, where Maxentius, with his army in flight, purportedly perished by drowning in the Tiber river.
The Battle of the Milvian Bridge took place between the Roman Emperors Constantine I and Maxentius on 28 October 312.

Battle of Turin (312)

Battle of TurinTurinbattle
In the ensuing battle Constantine spread his forces into a line, allowing Maxentius' cavalry to ride into the middle of his forces.
The Battle of Turin was fought in 312 between Roman emperor Constantine and the troops of his rival augustus, Maxentius.

Gaius Caeionius Rufius Volusianus

Rufius VolusianusC. Caeionius Rufius VolusianusVolusianus
In the meantime, Maxentius fortified northern Italy against potential invasions and sent a small army to Africa under the command of his praetorian prefect Rufius Volusianus which defeated and executed the usurper Domitius Alexander in 310 or 311.
When the Roman usurper Maxentius was recognized as emperor in Africa, Volusianus attached himself to his court.

Basilica of Maxentius

Basilica of ConstantineBasilica of Maxentius and ConstantineBasilica
Many buildings in Rome that are commonly associated with Constantine, such as the great basilica in the forum Romanum, were in fact built by Maxentius.
Construction began on the northern side of the forum under the emperor Maxentius in 308 AD, and was completed in 312 by Constantine I after his defeat of Maxentius at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge.

Mont Cenis

Massif du Mont-Ceniscol du Mont-CenisMoncenisio
Having crossed the Cottian Alps at the Mont Cenis pass, he first came to Segusium (Susa, Italy), a heavily fortified town containing a military garrison, which shut its gates to him.
One example is the descent of Constantine I to Italy, to fight against Maxentius.

Constantine and the Cross

Maxentius is the main antagonist of the 1961 film Constantine and the Cross.
Massimo Serato as Maxentius

Praetorian prefect

prefectpraefectus praetoriopraefecti praetorio
In the meantime, Maxentius fortified northern Italy against potential invasions and sent a small army to Africa under the command of his praetorian prefect Rufius Volusianus which defeated and executed the usurper Domitius Alexander in 310 or 311.