McClure's

McClure's MagazineMcClure’s MagazineMcClure, Philips and CompanyMcClureMcClure Syndicate
McClure's or McClure's Magazine (1893–1929) was an American illustrated monthly periodical popular at the turn of the 20th century.wikipedia
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Muckraker

muckrakingmuckrakersmuck-raking
The magazine is credited with having started the tradition of muckraking journalism (investigative, watchdog, or reform journalism), and helped direct the moral compass of the day.
Muckraking magazines—notably McClure's of the publisher S. S. McClure—took on corporate monopolies and political machines, while trying to raise public awareness and anger at urban poverty, unsafe working conditions, prostitution, and child labor.

Investigative journalism

investigative journalistexposéinvestigative reporter
The magazine is credited with having started the tradition of muckraking journalism (investigative, watchdog, or reform journalism), and helped direct the moral compass of the day.
American journalism textbooks point out that muckraking standards promoted by McClure's Magazine around 1902, "Have become integral to the character of modern investigative journalism."

S. S. McClure

S.S. McClureSamuel S. McClureMcClure, Phillips and Company
Founded by S. S. McClure (1857–1949) and John Sanborn Phillips (1861–1949), who had been classmates at Knox College, in June 1893.
He co-founded and ran McClure's Magazine from 1893 to 1911.

John Sanborn Phillips

Founded by S. S. McClure (1857–1949) and John Sanborn Phillips (1861–1949), who had been classmates at Knox College, in June 1893.
The two went on to found the famous McClure's Magazine, first published in June 1893, where Phillips was co-editor.

Willa Cather

Willa Sibert CatherCatherWilla Siebert Cather
In this way, McClure's published such writers as Willa Cather, Arthur Conan Doyle, Herminie T. Kavanagh, Rudyard Kipling, Jack London, Lincoln Steffens, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Mark Twain.
In 1906 Cather moved to New York City after being offered a position on the editorial staff of McClure's Magazine, a periodical connected with the publisher of The Troll Garden the year before.

Lincoln Steffens

Lincoln SteffansSteffens, Lincoln
In this way, McClure's published such writers as Willa Cather, Arthur Conan Doyle, Herminie T. Kavanagh, Rudyard Kipling, Jack London, Lincoln Steffens, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Mark Twain.
He launched a series of articles in McClure's, called Tweed Days in St. Louis, that would later be published together in a book titled The Shame of the Cities.

Ida Tarbell

Ida M. TarbellIda Minerva Tarbell
Examples of its work include Ida Tarbell's series in 1902 exposing the monopoly abuses of John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil Company, and Ray Stannard Baker's earlier look at the United States Steel Corporation, which focused the public eye on the conduct of corporations.
Born in Pennsylvania at the onset of the oil boom, Tarbell is best known for her 1904 book, The History of the Standard Oil Company. The book was published as a series of articles in McClure's Magazine from 1902 to 1904.

Herminie Templeton Kavanagh

H. T. KavanaghHerminie T. KavanaghHerminie Templeton
In this way, McClure's published such writers as Willa Cather, Arthur Conan Doyle, Herminie T. Kavanagh, Rudyard Kipling, Jack London, Lincoln Steffens, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Mark Twain.
Her best known work, Darby O'Gill and the Good People (ISBN: 0-9666701-0-8), was first published as a series of stories under the name Herminie Templeton in McClure's magazine in 1901–1902, before being published as a book in the United States in 1903.

Mary Baker Eddy

Mary Baker Eddy Historic HouseMary Baker Eddy Historic HomeMary Baker Eddy House
From January 1907 to June 1908, McClure's published the first detailed history of Christian Science and the story of its founder, Mary Baker Eddy (1821–1910) in 14 installments.
McClure's magazine published a series of articles in 1907 that were highly critical of Eddy, stating that Baker's home library had consisted of the Bible.

The Life of Mary Baker G. Eddy and the History of Christian Science

The articles were later published in book form as The Life of Mary Baker G. Eddy and the History of Christian Science (1909).
The first major examination of Eddy's life and work, the material initially appeared in McClure's magazine in 14 installments between January 1907 and June 1908, when Eddy was 85 years old, preceded in December 1906 by a six-page editorial announcing the series as "probably as near absolute accuracy as history ever gets".

The American Magazine

American MagazineThe AmericanAmerican
In 1906 three staffers left to form The American Magazine.
In June 1906, muckraking journalists Ray Stannard Baker, Lincoln Steffens and Ida M. Tarbell left McClure's to help create The American Magazine.

Knox College (Illinois)

Knox CollegeKnox (IL)Knox
Founded by S. S. McClure (1857–1949) and John Sanborn Phillips (1861–1949), who had been classmates at Knox College, in June 1893.

Ray Stannard Baker

David GraysonRay Stannard BarkerRaymond Stannard Baker
Examples of its work include Ida Tarbell's series in 1902 exposing the monopoly abuses of John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil Company, and Ray Stannard Baker's earlier look at the United States Steel Corporation, which focused the public eye on the conduct of corporations.
In 1898 Baker joined the staff of McClure's, a pioneer muckraking magazine, and quickly rose to prominence along with Lincoln Steffens and Ida Tarbell.

Standard Oil

Standard Oil CompanyStandard Oil TrustStandard Oil Co.
Examples of its work include Ida Tarbell's series in 1902 exposing the monopoly abuses of John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil Company, and Ray Stannard Baker's earlier look at the United States Steel Corporation, which focused the public eye on the conduct of corporations.
Her work was published in 19 parts in McClure's magazine from November 1902 to October 1904, then in 1904 as the book The History of the Standard Oil Co.

Witter Bynner

Emanuel MorganHarold Witter BynnerWitter Byner
After a trip to Europe, he took a position at McClure's Magazine and worked there for four years.

Burton J. Hendrick

In 1905, after writing for The New York Evening Post and The New York Sun, Hendrick left newspapers and became a "muckraker" writing for McClure's Magazine.

Christian Science

Christian ScientistChristian ScientistsChristian Science Church
From January 1907 to June 1908, McClure's published the first detailed history of Christian Science and the story of its founder, Mary Baker Eddy (1821–1910) in 14 installments.
The first history of Christian Science appeared in McClure's magazine in 14 installments from January 1907 to June 1908, preceded by an editorial in December 1906.

Georgine Milmine

Milmine, Georgine
Along with Willa Cather and others, Milmine worked as a researcher on 14 investigative articles about Eddy that were published by McClure's in 1907–1908.

Mark Sullivan (journalist)

Mark Sullivan
After writing for the Ladies Home Journal about misleading advertising for patent medicines, he was hired in 1905 by McClure's as a staff writer.

Will Irwin

William Henry IrwinIrwin, Will
Irwin was hired by S.S. McClure in 1906 as managing editor of McClure's.

Frank Norris

He worked for McClure's Magazine as a war correspondent in Cuba during the Spanish–American War in 1898.

The Smart Set

Smart Seta dull magazineThe ''Smart Set
The last issue was in March 1929, after which the magazine was taken over by The Smart Set.
In 1929 the magazine merged with Hearst’s newly acquired McClure's to form The New Smart Set, under the editorship of Margaret Sangster.

Stephen Crane

Crane, Stephen
In the spring of 1894, Crane offered the finished manuscript of The Red Badge of Courage to McClure's Magazine, which had become the foremost magazine for Civil War literature.

Marjorie Pickthall

PickthallMarjorie L. C. Pickthall
In 1905 Pickthall hired a New York agent, and soon began appearing in American magazines like the Atlantic Monthly, The Century Magazine, Harper's, McClure's, and Scribner's.