McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II non-U.S. operators

List of F-4 Phantom II operatorsPhantom FGR2F-4 2020 TerminatorF-4 Phantom II non-U.S. operatorsF-4E 2020 TerminatorF-4K PhantomHawker-Siddeley/McDonnell-Douglas F-4 Phantom II FGR.2McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom IIMcDonnell Douglas F-4M (FGR.2) PhantomMcDonnell Douglas RF-4E
F-4 Phantom II non-U.S.wikipedia
306 Related Articles

Hawker Hunter

HunterHuntersHawker Hunters
With the cancellation of home-grown programmes and the need to replace the Hawker Hunter and English Electric Canberra in the ground-attack and tactical reconnaissance roles, the RAF ordered 118 aircraft in 1965.
In British service, the Hunter was replaced in its principal roles by the Lightning, the Hawker Siddeley Harrier and the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II.

Popeye (missile)

PopeyeAGM-142 Have NapPopeye Turbo
The main updates involved the APG-76 radar, Elbit ACE-3 mission computer, HOTAS, the addition of winglets for increased agility, ASX-1 TISEO and the ability to deploy Popeye missiles.
Currently, the Turkish Air Force's F-4 2020 Terminator aircraft (which were extensively upgraded by IAI) and the TuAF F-16 CCIP are armed with a Turkish License production version of the Popeye.

McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II

F-4 Phantom IIF-4 PhantomF-4
In March 1963, McDonnell Douglas offered to provide the RAAF with a modified version of the F-4C, the model 98DX, fitted with SNECMA Atar 9 engines.
The Phantom has served with the air forces of many countries, including Australia, Egypt, Germany, United Kingdom, Greece, Iran, Israel, Japan, Spain, South Korea and Turkey.

Rolls-Royce Spey

SpeyRolls Royce Spey SM1CRolls Royce Spey
The main modification was the replacement of the General Electric J79 by the British-made Rolls-Royce Spey powerplant.

Air force

airAir Forcesairforce
F-4 Phantom II non-U.S. operators are the non-U.S. nations with air forces that operate or used to operate the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom II.

United States Armed Forces

United States militaryU.S. militaryUS military
The Phantom II entered service with the U.S. military in 1960 and served until 1996.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
During this time it was the primary interceptor, air superiority fighter and fighter bomber with the U.S. Navy, Marines and Air Force.

United States Navy

U.S. NavyUS NavyNavy
During this time it was the primary interceptor, air superiority fighter and fighter bomber with the U.S. Navy, Marines and Air Force.

United States Marine Corps

U.S. Marine CorpsMarinesMarine Corps
During this time it was the primary interceptor, air superiority fighter and fighter bomber with the U.S. Navy, Marines and Air Force.

United States Air Force

U.S. Air ForceAir ForceUSAF
During this time it was the primary interceptor, air superiority fighter and fighter bomber with the U.S. Navy, Marines and Air Force.

McDonnell Douglas

McDonnell-DouglasMcDonnell Douglas CorporationMcDonnell-Douglas Corporation
In March 1963, McDonnell Douglas offered to provide the RAAF with a modified version of the F-4C, the model 98DX, fitted with SNECMA Atar 9 engines.

Royal Australian Air Force

RAAFAir ForceAustralian Air Force
In March 1963, McDonnell Douglas offered to provide the RAAF with a modified version of the F-4C, the model 98DX, fitted with SNECMA Atar 9 engines.

Snecma Atar

AtarATAR 101ATAR 9
In March 1963, McDonnell Douglas offered to provide the RAAF with a modified version of the F-4C, the model 98DX, fitted with SNECMA Atar 9 engines.

Dassault Mirage III

Mirage IIIMirageMirages
This engine was already used in the RAAF's Mirage IIIOs, but the French turbojet was inferior to the General Electric J79, and the RAAF chose instead to order the F-111C Aardvark which had a greater range.

General Electric J79

J79GE J79J-79
The main modification was the replacement of the General Electric J79 by the British-made Rolls-Royce Spey powerplant. This engine was already used in the RAAF's Mirage IIIOs, but the French turbojet was inferior to the General Electric J79, and the RAAF chose instead to order the F-111C Aardvark which had a greater range.

English Electric Canberra

CanberraCanberrasCanberra bomber
With the cancellation of home-grown programmes and the need to replace the Hawker Hunter and English Electric Canberra in the ground-attack and tactical reconnaissance roles, the RAF ordered 118 aircraft in 1965. The need to replace their Canberra B.20s was frustrated by the delay in the development of the F-111.

RAAF Base Amberley

AmberleyRAAF Station AmberleyRAAF Amberley
1 and 6 Squadrons, both based at RAAF Base Amberley.

Boeing KC-135 Stratotanker

KC-135 StratotankerKC-135KC-135R Stratotanker
On balance, the F-4 would need to be supported by eight Boeing KC-135 Stratotankers to achieve the endurance required in Australian service with in-flight refueling, making the whole package uneconomical compared to the F-111C with its greater range.

No. 82 Wing RAAF

No. 82 WingNo. 82 (Bomber) WingNo. 82 (Heavy Bomber) Wing
Also, acquisition of the Phantom would have required disbanding at least one Mirage squadron in order to provide the necessary aircrew (No. 82 Wing's aircrew were to be converted to the F-111).

Evans Head, New South Wales

Evans Head
One Phantom (69-7203) was lost in an accident during Australian service, off Evans Head, New South Wales during night bombing practice on 16 June 1971, while the others went on to follow a long career with the United States Air Force, with 21 examples later modified to F-4G Wild Weasel specifications and used by the 35th and 52nd TFWs.

Egyptian Air Force

Royal Egyptian Air ForceAir ForceEgyptian Army Air Force
The Al Quwwat al Jawwiya il Misriya (Egyptian Air Force or EAF) encountered Israeli F-4s during fighting between the two states, especially during the later stages of the War of Attrition and the 1973 Yom Kippur War.

Israel

State of IsraelIsraeliISR
The Al Quwwat al Jawwiya il Misriya (Egyptian Air Force or EAF) encountered Israeli F-4s during fighting between the two states, especially during the later stages of the War of Attrition and the 1973 Yom Kippur War.