Medal for Merit

Presidential Medal for MeritMedal of Merit
The Medal for Merit was, during the period it was awarded, the highest civilian decoration of the United States.wikipedia
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Edgar Sengier

The first person to receive this medal who was not an American citizen was Edgar Sengier, the director of the Belgian Union Minière du Haut Katanga during World War II.
For his actions, he became the first non-American civilian to be awarded the Medal for Merit by the United States government.

Robert Watson-Watt

Robert Watson WattRobert WattRobert Alexander Watson-Watt
Another recipient was Sir Robert Watson-Watt, a British pioneer of radar, who created a chain of radar stations around the UK which enabled advance information to be available to the Royal Air Force of incoming German aircraft and was instrumental in the winning of the 1940 Battle of Britain.
He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1941, was given a knighthood in 1942 and was awarded the US Medal for Merit in 1946.

John Garand

John C. GarandJohn Cantius GarandGarand
The first medals were awarded to John C. Garand and Albert Hoyt Taylor on March 28, 1944.
For his work with the Springfield Armory, Garand was awarded the Meritorious Civilian Service Award in 1941, the Alexander L. Holley Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the first Medal for Merit (together with Albert Hoyt Taylor) on March 28, 1944.

Albert H. Taylor

A. Hoyt TaylorAlbert Hoyt TaylorA. H. Taylor
The first medals were awarded to John C. Garand and Albert Hoyt Taylor on March 28, 1944.

President's Certificate of Merit

Presidential Certificate of MeritPresident's Certificate of Merit for Civilians in World War IIPresident's Merit Award
*President's Certificate of Merit
The award was for an act or service that was of high degree, but not sufficiently extraordinary or meritorious enough to warrant the Medal for Merit.

William Stephenson

Sir William StephensonWilliam Samuel StephensonSir William Samuel Stephenson
The second foreign civilian to receive the medal was the Canadian spymaster William Stephenson in November 1946.
In November 1946 Stephenson received the Medal for Merit from President Harry S. Truman, at that time the highest U.S. civilian award.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The Medal for Merit was, during the period it was awarded, the highest civilian decoration of the United States.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
It was awarded by the President of the United States to civilians who "distinguished themselves by exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services" in the war effort "since the proclamation of an emergency by the President on September 8, 1939".

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
Created during World War II, and awarded to "civilians of the nations prosecuting the war under the joint declaration of the United Nations and of other friendly foreign nations", the medal has not been awarded since 1952.

Lifesaving Medal

Gold Lifesaving MedalSilver Lifesaving MedalCongressional Life Saving Medal
The Medal for Merit is currently listed as seventh in order of precedence of U.S. civilian decorations, below the Silver Lifesaving Medal and above the National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal.

National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal

Distinguished Intelligence MedalDistinguished Public Service Medal
The Medal for Merit is currently listed as seventh in order of precedence of U.S. civilian decorations, below the Silver Lifesaving Medal and above the National Intelligence Distinguished Service Medal.

Allies of World War II

AlliedAlliesAllied forces
Civilians of foreign nations could receive the award for the performance of an exceptionally meritorious or courageous act or acts in furtherance of the war efforts of the Allies against the Axis Powers.

Axis powers

AxisAxis forcesAxis power
Civilians of foreign nations could receive the award for the performance of an exceptionally meritorious or courageous act or acts in furtherance of the war efforts of the Allies against the Axis Powers.

Union Minière du Haut Katanga

Union MinièreUnion Minière du Haut-KatangaCumerio
The first person to receive this medal who was not an American citizen was Edgar Sengier, the director of the Belgian Union Minière du Haut Katanga during World War II.

James Bond

Bond007James Bond 007
Some writers consider Stephenson to be one of the real life inspirations for the fictitious character "James Bond".

Royal Air Force

RAFairmanR.A.F.
Another recipient was Sir Robert Watson-Watt, a British pioneer of radar, who created a chain of radar stations around the UK which enabled advance information to be available to the Royal Air Force of incoming German aircraft and was instrumental in the winning of the 1940 Battle of Britain.

Battle of Britain

Britainair battle with GermanyBattle of Britain Day
Another recipient was Sir Robert Watson-Watt, a British pioneer of radar, who created a chain of radar stations around the UK which enabled advance information to be available to the Royal Air Force of incoming German aircraft and was instrumental in the winning of the 1940 Battle of Britain.

Al Jolson

JolsonA. JolsonAsa Yoelson / Al Jolson, as a boy
Defense Secretary George Marshall posthumously awarded him the Medal for Merit.

Samuel King Allison

Samuel K. AllisonSamuel AllisonAllison, Samuel K.
Samuel King Allison (November 13, 1900 – September 15, 1965) was an American physicist, most notable for his role in the Manhattan Project, for which he was awarded the Medal for Merit.

Benjamin Franklin Fairless

Benjamin F. FairlessBenjamin Fairless
He received the Medal for Merit in 1946 for helping to break steel production bottlenecks in the United States during World War II.

Raymond D. Mindlin

MindlinRaymond Mindlin
Raymond David Mindlin (New York City, 17 September 1906 – 22 November 1987) was an American mechanical engineer, Professor of Applied Science at Columbia University, and recipient of the 1946 Presidential Medal for Merit and many other awards and honours.