Median arcuate ligament syndrome

Coeliac artery compression syndrome
In medicine, the median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS, also known as celiac artery compression syndrome, celiac axis syndrome, celiac trunk compression syndrome or Dunbar syndrome) is a condition characterized by abdominal pain attributed to compression of the celiac artery and the celiac ganglia by the median arcuate ligament.wikipedia
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Bruit

bruitsarterial bruitsCardiac bruit
The abdominal pain may be related to meals, may be accompanied by weight loss, and may be associated with an abdominal bruit heard by a clinician. Occasionally, physical examination reveals an abdominal bruit in the mid-epigastrium.

Median arcuate ligament

In medicine, the median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS, also known as celiac artery compression syndrome, celiac axis syndrome, celiac trunk compression syndrome or Dunbar syndrome) is a condition characterized by abdominal pain attributed to compression of the celiac artery and the celiac ganglia by the median arcuate ligament. The median arcuate ligament is a ligament formed at the base of the diaphragm where the left and right diaphragmatic crura join near the 12th thoracic vertebra.
Compression of celiac artery and celiac ganglia by the median arcuate ligament can lead to the median arcuate ligament syndrome, which is characterized by abdominal pain, weight loss, and an epigastric bruit.

Celiac artery

celiac trunkceliacceliac axis
In medicine, the median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS, also known as celiac artery compression syndrome, celiac axis syndrome, celiac trunk compression syndrome or Dunbar syndrome) is a condition characterized by abdominal pain attributed to compression of the celiac artery and the celiac ganglia by the median arcuate ligament. Side views (sagittal plane) of the descending aorta and two of its branches, the celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery, demonstrate normal and MALS anatomy.
* Coeliac artery compression syndrome

Medicine

medicalmedical scienceclinical medicine
In medicine, the median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS, also known as celiac artery compression syndrome, celiac axis syndrome, celiac trunk compression syndrome or Dunbar syndrome) is a condition characterized by abdominal pain attributed to compression of the celiac artery and the celiac ganglia by the median arcuate ligament.

Abdominal pain

stomach acheupset stomachabdominal discomfort
In medicine, the median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS, also known as celiac artery compression syndrome, celiac axis syndrome, celiac trunk compression syndrome or Dunbar syndrome) is a condition characterized by abdominal pain attributed to compression of the celiac artery and the celiac ganglia by the median arcuate ligament. Patients with MALS reportedly experience abdominal pain, particularly in the epigastrium, which may be associated with eating and which may result in anorexia and weight loss.

Celiac ganglia

celiac ganglionceliacGanglion coeliacum
In medicine, the median arcuate ligament syndrome (MALS, also known as celiac artery compression syndrome, celiac axis syndrome, celiac trunk compression syndrome or Dunbar syndrome) is a condition characterized by abdominal pain attributed to compression of the celiac artery and the celiac ganglia by the median arcuate ligament. Treatment is generally surgical, the mainstay being open or laparascopic division, or separation, of the median arcuate ligament combined with removal of the celiac ganglia.

Medical ultrasound

ultrasoundultrasonographymedical ultrasonography
Once suspected, screening for MALS can be done with ultrasonography and confirmed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography.

Minimally invasive procedure

minimally invasiveminimally invasive surgerynon-invasive
Treatment is generally surgical, the mainstay being open or laparascopic division, or separation, of the median arcuate ligament combined with removal of the celiac ganglia.

Laparoscopy

laparoscopiclaparoscopic surgerylaparoscopically
Treatment is generally surgical, the mainstay being open or laparascopic division, or separation, of the median arcuate ligament combined with removal of the celiac ganglia.

Mental disorder

mental illnessnervous breakdownmentally ill
Poorer responses to treatment tend to occur in patients of older age, those with a psychiatric condition or who use alcohol, have abdominal pain unrelated to meals, or who have not experienced weight loss.

Epigastrium

epigastricepigastric regionupper abdomen
Patients with MALS reportedly experience abdominal pain, particularly in the epigastrium, which may be associated with eating and which may result in anorexia and weight loss. Occasionally, physical examination reveals an abdominal bruit in the mid-epigastrium.

Anorexia (symptom)

anorexialoss of appetitedecreased appetite
Patients with MALS reportedly experience abdominal pain, particularly in the epigastrium, which may be associated with eating and which may result in anorexia and weight loss.

Weight loss

weight-losslose weightlosing weight
Patients with MALS reportedly experience abdominal pain, particularly in the epigastrium, which may be associated with eating and which may result in anorexia and weight loss.

Physical examination

physical exammedical examinationexamination
Occasionally, physical examination reveals an abdominal bruit in the mid-epigastrium.

Gastroparesis

delayed gastric emptyingdelayed stomach emptyingDiabetic gastroparesis
They include gastroparesis and aneurysm of the superior and inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries.

Aneurysm

aneurysmsaneurismruptured aneurysm
They include gastroparesis and aneurysm of the superior and inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries.

Superior pancreaticoduodenal artery

Anterior superior pancreaticoduodenal arterysuperiorPosterior superior pancreaticoduodenal artery
They include gastroparesis and aneurysm of the superior and inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries.

Inferior pancreaticoduodenal artery

inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteriesAnterior inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteryinferior
They include gastroparesis and aneurysm of the superior and inferior pancreaticoduodenal arteries.

Superior mesenteric artery

superiorSuperior mesentericcranial mesenteric artery
Side views (sagittal plane) of the descending aorta and two of its branches, the celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery, demonstrate normal and MALS anatomy.

Ligament

ligamentsknee ligamentcapsular ligaments
The median arcuate ligament is a ligament formed at the base of the diaphragm where the left and right diaphragmatic crura join near the 12th thoracic vertebra.

Thoracic diaphragm

diaphragmdiaphragmatichemidiaphragm
The median arcuate ligament is a ligament formed at the base of the diaphragm where the left and right diaphragmatic crura join near the 12th thoracic vertebra.

Crus of diaphragm

cruracrura of the diaphragmcrus of the diaphragm
The median arcuate ligament is a ligament formed at the base of the diaphragm where the left and right diaphragmatic crura join near the 12th thoracic vertebra.

Thoracic vertebrae

dorsal vertebraethoracic vertebrathoracic
The median arcuate ligament is a ligament formed at the base of the diaphragm where the left and right diaphragmatic crura join near the 12th thoracic vertebra.

Aortic hiatus

aortic aperturehiatus aorticus
This fibrous arch forms the anterior aspect of the aortic hiatus, through which the aorta, thoracic duct, and azygos vein pass.