Medical cannabis

medical marijuanamedicinalmedicalmedicinal marijuanamedicinal cannabismedical purposesmedical usemedical use of marijuanamedicinal purposesCannabis
Medical cannabis, or medical marijuana, is cannabis and cannabinoids that are recommended by doctors for their patients.wikipedia
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Cannabis (drug)

marijuanacannabispot
Medical cannabis, or medical marijuana, is cannabis and cannabinoids that are recommended by doctors for their patients.
Cannabis, also known as marijuana among other names, is a psychoactive drug from the Cannabis plant used for medical or recreational purposes.

1996 California Proposition 215

Proposition 215California Proposition 215California law (HSC §11362.5)
In the United States, 33 states and the District of Columbia have legalized cannabis for medical purposes, beginning with the passage of California's Proposition 215 in 1996.
Proposition 215, or the Compassionate Use Act of 1996, is a California law allowing the use of medical cannabis despite marijuana's lack of the normal Food and Drug Administration testing for safety and efficacy.

Cannabis edible

cannabis foodshash browniespot brownies
Medical cannabis can be administered through a variety of methods, including capsules, lozenges, tinctures, dermal patches, oral or dermal sprays, cannabis edibles, and vaporizing or smoking dried buds.
THC-dominant edibles are consumed for recreational and medical purposes.

Cannabis

marijuanahemppot
The genus Cannabis contains two species which produce useful amounts of psychoactive cannabinoids: Cannabis indica and Cannabis sativa, which are listed as Schedule I medicinal plants in the US; a third species, Cannabis ruderalis, has few psychogenic properties.
Cannabis has long been used for hemp fibre, hemp seeds and their oils, hemp leaves for use as vegetables and as juice, medicinal purposes, and as a recreational drug.

Cannabis sativa

sativacannabisdagga
The genus Cannabis contains two species which produce useful amounts of psychoactive cannabinoids: Cannabis indica and Cannabis sativa, which are listed as Schedule I medicinal plants in the US; a third species, Cannabis ruderalis, has few psychogenic properties.
It has been cultivated throughout recorded history, used as a source of industrial fiber, seed oil, food, recreation, religious and spiritual moods and medicine.

HIV/AIDS

AIDSHIVacquired immune deficiency syndrome
Limited evidence suggests that cannabis can reduce nausea and vomiting during chemotherapy, improve appetite in people with HIV/AIDS, and reduce chronic pain and muscle spasms. Low quality evidence suggests its use for reducing nausea during chemotherapy, improving appetite in HIV/AIDS, improving sleep, and improving tics in Tourette syndrome.
There is insufficient evidence to recommend or support the use of medical cannabis to try to increase appetite or weight gain.

Antiemetic

antiemeticsanti-emeticanti-emetics
Low quality evidence suggests its use for reducing nausea during chemotherapy, improving appetite in HIV/AIDS, improving sleep, and improving tics in Tourette syndrome.
Cannabis, also known as medical marijuana in the United States, is a Schedule I drug.

Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

chemotherapy induced nausea and vomitingchemotherapychemotherapy induced nausea
Medical cannabis is somewhat effective in chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) and may be a reasonable option in those who do not improve following preferential treatment.
Natural medical cannabis is also used and recommended by some oncologists, though its use is regulated and it is not legal in all jurisdictions.

Posttraumatic stress disorder

post-traumatic stress disorderpost traumatic stress disorderPTSD
There is tentative evidence that medical cannabis is effective at reducing posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, but, there is insufficient evidence to confirm its effectiveness for this condition.
Evidence as of 2017 is insufficient to determine if medical cannabis is useful for PTSD.

Chronic pain

chronicpainchronic, often intermittent pain
Evidence is moderate that it helps in chronic pain and muscle spasms.
Preliminary studies have found medical marijuana to be beneficial in treating neuropathic pain, but not other kinds of long term pain.

William Brooke O'Shaughnessy

William O'ShaughnessyO’ShaughnessyW. B. O'Shaughnessy
An Irish physician, William Brooke O'Shaughnessy, is credited with introducing cannabis to Western medicine.
His medical research led to the development of intravenous therapy and introduced the therapeutic use of Cannabis sativa to Western medicine.

Multiple sclerosis

MSdisseminated sclerosisMultiple sclerosis (MS)
Cannabis' efficacy is not clear in treating neurological problems, including multiple sclerosis (MS), epilepsy, and movement problems.
Treatments of unproven benefit used by people with MS include dietary supplementation and regimens, vitamin D, relaxation techniques such as yoga, herbal medicine (including medical cannabis), hyperbaric oxygen therapy, self-infection with hookworms, reflexology, acupuncture, and mindfulness.

Cannabis indica

indicaIndian hempC. indica
The genus Cannabis contains two species which produce useful amounts of psychoactive cannabinoids: Cannabis indica and Cannabis sativa, which are listed as Schedule I medicinal plants in the US; a third species, Cannabis ruderalis, has few psychogenic properties.
Common indica strains for recreational or medicinal use include Kush and Northern Lights.

National Institute on Drug Abuse

NIDANational Institute of Drug AbuseDrug Abuse
The rate goes up to one in six among those who begin use as adolescents, and one-quarter to one-half of those who use it daily according to a NIDA review.
Medical marijuana researchers typically prefer to use high-potency marijuana, but NIDA's National Advisory Council on Drug Abuse has been reluctant to provide cannabis with high THC levels, citing safety concerns:

Long-term effects of cannabis

effects of smoking cannabisassociated with comorbid mental health problemsCannabis can be a contributory factor in schizophrenia
There has been a limited amount of studies that have looked at the effects of smoking cannabis on the respiratory system.
Medical cannabis

Cannabis dispensaries in the United States

cannabis dispensariescannabis dispensarydispensaries
In the US, most consumers grow their own or buy it from cannabis dispensaries in states where it is legal.
In a traditional Medical cannabis dispensary store a patient receives cannabis medication as allowed per the patient's doctor's recommendation.

Cannabis use disorder

cannabis dependencemarijuana abusemarijuana addiction
Effects of chronic use may include bronchitis, a cannabis dependence syndrome, and subtle impairments of attention and memory.
Medical cannabis

Cannabicyclol

Other cannabinoids include delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), cannabicyclol (CBL), cannabichromene (CBC) and cannabigerol (CBG); they have less psychotropic effects than THC, but may play a role in the overall effect of cannabis.
Medical cannabis

Marihuana Tax Act of 1937

Marihuana Tax Act1937 Marihuana Tax Act1937 Marijuana Tax Act
In the United States, the medical use of cannabis further declined with the passage of the Marihuana Tax Act of 1937, which imposed new regulations and fees on physicians prescribing cannabis.
The American Medical Association (AMA) opposed the act because the tax was imposed on physicians prescribing cannabis, retail pharmacists selling cannabis, and medical cannabis cultivation/manufacturing.

Nabilone

Cesamet
Synthetic cannabinoids are available for prescription use in some countries, such as dronabinol and nabilone.
Nabilone, sold under the brand name Cesamet among others, is a synthetic cannabinoid with therapeutic use as an antiemetic and as an adjunct analgesic for neuropathic pain.

Legality of cannabis

legalization of marijuanamarijuana legalizationlegalization of cannabis
For reasons including increased popular support of cannabis use, a trend of cannabis legalization, and the perception of medical usefulness, more scientists are doing medical cannabis research.
The legality of cannabis for medical and recreational use varies by country, in terms of its possession, distribution, and cultivation, and (in regards to medical) how it can be consumed and what medical conditions it can be used for.

Tilden's Extract

Tilden’s extract
Tilden's Extract
Tilden's Extract was a 19th-century medicinal cannabis extract, first formulated by James Edward Smith of Edinburgh.

Cannabigerol

CBG
Other cannabinoids include delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), cannabicyclol (CBL), cannabichromene (CBC) and cannabigerol (CBG); they have less psychotropic effects than THC, but may play a role in the overall effect of cannabis.
Medical cannabis

Cachexia

wasting syndromecachecticcancer cachexia
Cannabis began to attract renewed interest as medicine in the 1970s and 1980s, in particular due to its use by cancer and AIDS patients who reported relief from the effects of chemotherapy and wasting syndrome.
Medical marijuana has been allowed for the treatment of cachexia in some US states, such as Illinois, Maryland, Delaware, Nevada, Michigan, Washington, Oregon, California, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Vermont, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Maine, and New York Hawaii and Connecticut.

Charlotte's web (cannabis)

Charlotte's WebCharlotte's Web cannabisCharlotte's Web cannabis strain
Charlotte's Web cannabis strain
Colorado law permits the use of medical cannabis for eight conditions: cancer, glaucoma, HIV/AIDS, muscle spasms, seizures, severe pain, severe nausea and dramatic weight loss, and muscle atrophy.